Saturday Surprise — In Pictures

One of the suggestions for the new Saturday Surprise feature came from Eschudel of Zombie Flamingos who suggested a ‘Snapshot Saturday’ with unusual or interesting pictures from the week.  Sounded like a good idea, so I went in search of and found a hodge-podge of unusual, touching pictures, but as I was loading them onto this post, I concluded that there needed to be a theme.  So, I sat down and ate dinner, responded to comments from the day, chatted a bit with the family, and then when I came back to work, a theme hit me!  (No, it didn’t hurt … at least not much.)  What about unusual animals?  So, I once again went in search of … and I found some really, really strange creatures (no, I wasn’t in a bar!!!).  So … sit back and take a look at some of these guys!

The Panda Ant

Panda-ant

The Mutillidae are a family of more than 3,000 species of wasps (despite the names) whose wingless females resemble large, hairy ants. Found in Chile, they are known for their extremely painful stings, hence the common name cow killer or cow ant. Black and white specimens are sometimes known as panda ants due to their hair coloration resembling that of the Chinese giant panda. (Image credits: Chris Lukhaup)

Hummingbird Hawk-Moth

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As this hawk-moth feeds on flowers and makes a similar humming sound, it looks a lot like a hummingbird. What’s interesting is that it is surprisingly good at learning colors. (Image credits: Jerzy Strzelecki | unknown)

Glaucus Atlanticus (aka Blue Dragon)

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Also known as the blue dragon, this creature is a is a species of blue sea slug. You could find it in warm waters of the oceans, as it floats on the surface because of a gas-filled sac in its stomach. (Image credits: unknown | unknown | paulhypnos)

Venezuelan Poodle Moth

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Discovered in Venezuela in 2009, this new species of alien-looking moth is still poorly explored. Waiting for more info about them! (Image credits: Arthur Anker | imgur)

The Blue Parrotfish

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This bright blue fish can be found in the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, and spends 80% of its time searching for food. (Image credits: imgur | depalmadise)

Okapi

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This mammal is native to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Central Africa. Despite the zebra-like stripes, it is actually more closely related to giraffes. (Image credits: marylandzoo.org | baynews9.com)

Sea Pig

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Scotoplanes live on deep ocean bottoms, specifically on the abyssal plain in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean, typically at depths of over 1000 meters. They are deposit feeders, and obtain food by extracting organic particles from deep-sea mud. (Image credits: imgur | thedailygreen.com | realcoldfish)

Aye-aye

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Due to its bizarre appearance and unusual feeding habits, the aye-aye is considered by many to be the strangest primate in the world. It is the world’s largest nocturnal primate. Unusual physical characteristics include incisors that are continually growing (unique among primates), extremely large ears, and a middle finger which is skeletal in appearance, and is used by the animal as a primary sensory organ.

Aren’t they all just adorable?  Which was your favourite?  I am torn between the Okapi and the Aye-aye.  I had fun finding these guys … there are many, many more, so we shall do this again sometime soon.

Stay tuned for next week’s Saturday Surprise!

49 thoughts on “Saturday Surprise — In Pictures

        • I talk to the bumble bees, and sometimes one of the yellow birds will join in, every morning when I am out watering my flowers, but that is really the only time I see them ‘up close and personal’. On occasion we get a few ants in he house, but I wouldn’t mind seeing one of those panda ants up close! Amazing how many things there are in nature of which we are completely unaware!

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          • you are a kindred soul for sure… I always say thank you when I see an animal…deer, raccoon, opossum…etc. up close. They say they only let us see them when they want to. Not counting cats…I always talk to cats. I read something about animals being affected by the eclipse…including dogs, but it said “who would know if cats were acting strange or not?” haha

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            • I do too!!! Early this summer, there was a family of ducks nesting in the cattails by the park where I walk. Not many people even knew they were there, but I would see them sometimes, stop and speak very softly to them … they never flew off unless somebody else came along. And on the path I take to go home, there is a rabbit that will sometimes come onto the path and look at me as if daring me to play! These are the simple moments that bring the biggest smiles to my face! And yes, I talk to my cats and I’m pretty sure they talk back. At least … I always know what they are thinking! 😉

              I did find an article when I was researching animals for this post that said several species reacted to the eclipse. Giraffes, apparently, were frightened and opossums came out. I wasn’t home that day, but my granddaughter said she didn’t notice any difference in the way the kitties were acting. But, as you said, who could tell? 🙂

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              • well as you know, my old Mrs. Tinky is on her last days, but she insists on doing her death-defying leaps from the table to the counter as she always has. She has in her head now that it is nice when I hold her, I think she’s cold. She is so thin that her claws are almost exposed all the time, so she’s always stuck on my clothes. Last night she fell off the counter with a clunk, scratching wildly, and when I picked her up she bit me a good one in my right hand.

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                • Awww …. poor Mrs. Tinky. Our Orange is also on his last legs and is much the same, except for jumping. He is arthritic and gave up jumping long ago. But he does feel a need to be held, and not just on our laps, but like an infant, on our shoulders. And the claws … I do not have a single pair of sweats that don’t have holes, not to mention what my legs and shoulders look like. But we don’t complain, for he will not likely be with us much longer. In fact, I am surprised he still is, for to watch him walk is misery. But his appetite for yogurt hasn’t diminished! 😉 I am surprised Mrs. Tinky didn’t suffer broken bones when she fell off the counter!

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                    • Oh MY!!! That is terrible, but yet good that you still have her! We went through something similar several years ago when our Spooky (now deceased) had a stroke. I know you must be relieved, and yet since it is inevitable, it’s almost as if you will have gone through losing her twice. I send you hugs, for I almost cried myself when I read this! And gentle hugs for Mrs. Tinky.

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                    • Mrs. Tinky is not for this world. We keep putting her in a box we fixed for her, but she gets out and lays on the stone tile floor. She just walked out to the kitchen to get a drink of water, but she was too weak to get back. My other cats are all hanging out and looking sad. .. or not…who knows?

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