Let Them Eat Trump Steaks

Paul Krugman is an economist who has taught Economics at MIT, Yale, and the London School of Economics.  In 2008, he won a Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. This man obviously knows of what he speaks. He is also a columnist for the New York Times.  His column today, titled Let Them Eat Trump Steaks, is about the current administration’s efforts to rob low income people of any and all benefits. His words grabbed me and I felt it was something worth sharing. cognitive dissonance

In general, Donald Trump is notoriously uninterested in policy details. It has long been obvious, for example, that he never bothered to find out what his one major legislative victory, the 2017 tax cut, actually did. Similarly, it’s pretty clear that he had no idea what was actually in the Iran agreement he just repudiated.

In each case, it was about ego rather than substance: scoring a “win,” undoing his predecessor’s achievement.

But there are some policy issues he really does care about. By all accounts, he really hates the idea of people receiving “welfare,” by which he means any government program that helps people with low income, and he wants to eliminate such programs wherever possible.

Most recently, he has reportedly threatened to veto the upcoming farm bill unless it imposes stringent new work requirements on recipients of SNAP — the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, still commonly referred to as food stamps.

Let me be upfront here: There’s something fundamentally obscene about this spectacle. Here we have a man who inherited great wealth, then built a business career largely around duping the gullible — whether they were naïve investors in his business ventures left holding the bag when those ventures went bankrupt, or students who wasted time and money on worthless degrees from Trump University. Yet he’s determined to snatch food from the mouths of the truly desperate, because he’s sure that somehow or other they’re getting away with something, having it too easy.

But however petty Trump’s motives, this is a big deal from the other side. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that new work requirements plus other restrictions proposed by House Republicans would end up denying or reducing nutritional aid to around two million people, mostly in families with children.

Why would anyone want to do that? The thing is, it’s not just Trump: Conservative hatred for food stamps is pervasive. What’s behind it?

The more respectable, supposedly intellectual side of conservative opinion portrays food stamps as reducing incentives by making life too pleasant for the poor. As Paul Ryan put it, SNAP and other programs create a “hammock” that “lulls able-bodied people to lives of dependency and complacency.”

But this is a problem that exists only in the right’s imagination. Able-bodied SNAP recipients who should be working but aren’t are very hard to find: A vast majority of the program’s beneficiaries either are working — but at unstable jobs that pay low wages — or are children, elderly, disabled or essential family caregivers.

Oh, and there’s strong evidence that children in low-income families that receive food stamps become more productive and healthier adults, which means that the program is actually good for long-run economic growth.

Is it about the money? The enactment of the budget-busting 2017 tax cut proved once and for all, for anyone who had doubts, that Republicans don’t actually care about deficits.

But even if they did care about deficits, the C.B.O. estimates that the proposed cuts to food stamps would save less than one percent, that’s right, one percent, of the revenue lost due to that tax cut. In fact, over the next decade the entire SNAP program, which helps 40 million Americans, will cost only about a third as much as the tax cut. No, it’s not about the money.

What about racism? Historically, attacks on food stamps have often involved a barely disguised racial element — for example, when Ronald Reagan imagined a “strapping young buck” using food stamps to buy T-bone steaks. And I suspect that Trump himself still thinks of food stamps as a program for urban black people.

But while many urban blacks do get food stamps, so do many rural whites. Nationally, significantly more whites than blacks receive food stamps, and participation in SNAP is higher in rural than in urban counties. Food stamps are especially important in depressed regions like Appalachia that have lost jobs in coal and other traditional sectors.

And yes, this means that some of the biggest victims of Trump’s obsession with cutting “welfare” will be the very people who put him in office.

Consider Owsley County, Ky., at the epicenter of Appalachia’s regional crisis. More than half the county’s population receives food stamps; 84 percent of its voters supported Trump in 2016. Did they know what they were voting for?

In the end, I don’t believe there’s any policy justification for the attack on food stamps: It’s not about the incentives, and it’s not about the money. And even the racial animus that traditionally underlies attacks on U.S. social programs has receded partially into the background.

No, this is about petty cruelty turned into a principle of government. It’s about privileged people who look at the less fortunate and don’t think, “There but for the grace of God go I”; they just see a bunch of losers. They don’t want to help the less fortunate; in fact, they get angry at the very idea of public aid that makes those losers a bit less miserable.

And these are the people now running America.

These, folks, are the facts.  Just one more reason we need to ensure some changes happen on 06 November.

77 thoughts on “Let Them Eat Trump Steaks

  1. Dear Jill,

    The president is just one angry, spiteful, jealous, cruel, selfish, inconsiderate, vindictive cheapskate. His lack of caring for the little guy will eventually hit home to even many of his supporters, but we can’t afford to wait for them to figure out that they are being screwed, bigly.

    If the president continues down the path of imposing tariffs, the economy will suffer.

    It used to be that you could stop any politician from ever considering tariffs by just uttering the words Hawley–Smoot, which represented a law by 2 congress representatives to impose tariffs in 1930. It was signed by President Hoover. At the time, 1000 economists wrote a letter to the US congress begging them not to take this action. They warned about how these tariffs could damage the US economy. No one listened. They economy was already reeling from the 1929 recession. These tariffs caused the economy into a further decline by 26%. It took years to recover from this nearly fatal error.

    But we have a president who has never opened a history book and who thinks he knows more than all the experts who actually do read, study etc. And so we are doomed with this administration until and unless, the GOP are kicked out of the US Congress and the White House.

    Hugs, Gronda

    Liked by 1 person

    • I learned something new, for I was not aware of Hawley-Smoot. Therein lies the danger of a man at the helm who not only has no knowledge of the lessons of history, but also refuses to learn from those who are smarter and better-educated than he. That makes him very dangerous, especially in light of the fact that in his mind, he is convinced that he is smarter than all the rest. Frankly, I think he is all the adjectives you used, and stupid as well. We absolutely have to make changes in November. Failure is not an option!

      Hugs!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s things like this that make me wonder what our nation will look like by the end of Trump’s presidency (when he will have pushed through term limits on politicians — all except the president who will be able to stay president as long as he wants — sort of like Putin…)

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    • Well, let us hope he doesn’t last even one full term, let alone two. I’m sure he would love to do what Xi, Putin, and Erdogan have done and extend his term, but fortunately, it’s much easier said that done, and very unlikely to happen. It would require a constitutional amendment, which requires a 2/3 majority in BOTH chambers of Congress. Not likely. But in just 15 months he has destroyed much, and I shudder to think what damage he could do by 2020. That’s why the mid-terms are so important … we need to get the boot-lickers out of Congress.

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  3. ‘ Lulls able- bodied people into lives of dependency ‘ what absolute rubbish. Don’t the shareholders depend upon the workers ? Don’t the bankers depend upon handling money at a profit, which used to be called usury? Don’t the government depend upon the tax payers for their salaries? Show me one single person who does not depend upon others. The problem lies in inequality , more money needs to flow down to the needy but there are serious blockages at the upper levels due to human greed . Along with greed is the unpleasant characteristic of envy many humans cannot bear to to think others are getting something for nothing and they pat themselves on the back because they deserve everything that comes their way.

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    • You summed it up neatly. I asked not long ago, if they kill off all the lower-income people by taking away their health care, their food stamps, etc., then who will grow their food, build their mansions, work the assembly lines in their auto factories? We all rely on others, and when I was in management, I always preached that the employees were the greatest asset any company has. You may have paid $200 million for that fancy printing press, but with nobody to operate it, it is worthless. Take care of people, and they will take care of you. Sadly, the concept is falling by the wayside.

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    • Many thanks for the re-blog! I have some serious concerns about the November mid-terms, but we simply MUST put some new blood into Congress and sooner than later, for every day, Trump is destroying more, and the current congress is unwilling or unable to stop him. Thanks again!

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  4. Jill, well said. There is a lot to comment on. While Trump captured the hearts of a large swath of disenfranchised people, he has been equally good at masking who he is really helping and overlooking the fact he was handed the keys to a pretty good economy.

    The tax law was heavily weighted for the wealthy. Repealing and not repairing the ACA would be very detrimental to people in and just above poverty level. You mention the work requirement, but Trump cherry picks data from state pilots and do not share the entire story.

    Within two hours of taking the oath of office he rescinded a mortgage insurance premium reduction that would have helped 1 million families who could not put enough down. He also put Mick Mulvaney in charge of a hugely successful Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and they are now talking about making pay day lending legal in states that banned it. This is predatory lending that preys on poor people and military people.

    If people understood they were being screwed, they would revolt against this man. Yet, they have no clue. The economy did not just get switched on when he became President. I saw one guy in Indiana credit Trump for dropping his city’s unemployment rate from 20% to 2%. Yet, it was reduced to 3% when Obama left office. Keith

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    • Last I read, our economy has been improving for something like 102 months. That’s well before Trump even ran for President. His lies, deceit and grotesque behavior are deeply disturbing to witness and live with. This man can not be out of office soon enough.

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    • Yes, I am constantly puzzled and frustrated by the number of people who are buying into the snake oil this man peddles. Surely they cannot be so blind? And yet, they are. The payday lending? I have a friend who got so deeply in debt from the payday lenders … each pay, he couldn’t quite pay it all back, so the interest kept building and building. Long story short, he eventually realized his predicament and tried to take his own life. Mulvaney is an a## just like Pruitt, Zinke, DeVos and all the rest. I just hope the people wake up before it is too late, for I fear there will come a point of no return if we don’t make some changes in November.

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  5. I liked this article. I recently received a copy of an article by a group named yes@needtoimpeach.com. I know nothing about this group or another they refer to, Stand Up America. But the first group is reportedly holding town meetings across the US. Do you know anything about them? I just read about the deportation of 300,000 persons who were already accepted. I do not understand how he gets away with these actions, which seem to be against civil rights, and the Constitution.

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    • Need to Impeach is a very good, and legit group started and run by billionaire Tom Steyer. They have an online petition with over 5 million signatures on it calling for Trump’s impeachment. The group never asks for money or donations, and the meetings they hold throughout the country are supposed to be quite helpful. I’m on their email list and they don’t spam your inbox with all sorts of crud. It’s nice to see a billionaire use his money to fight against Trump rather than for him.

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    • I have heard of the group, but I’m glad that Jeff had the answer to your question, for other than recognizing the name, I know nothing about them. But now you’ve piqued my curiosity, and tomorrow I shall have to look into it.

      As for the deportees … I am also incensed, but … he can do this because their immigration status has always been ‘temporary’. They were accepted as refugees when storms devastated their own countries: Haiti, El Salvador, Nepal, Honduras. The thing is, though, that many of them have been here long enough that they have good jobs, own homes, and their entire life is here. So, even though their immigration was never intended to become permanent, it is cruel and inhumane to deport them. But is it legal? Yes.

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  6. I’m going political here because I’m a mood….
    Nothing surprises me here. With one of their own fabricated and stuffed into a position he does not deserve and is not worthy of the name of the holder of the office.
    So it’s stamp down the poor time, and ‘let’s grab as much as we can, and screw any of our kind who stumbles because we won’t be there to pick him up, we’ll be running to save our own asses’…..
    Typical of the Excesses of Capitalism, like any system with the right level of legislation and responsibility it rots.
    And when Trump and co are rotting in their graves they will be vilified and decried for just what they are. So what do they think about that now, because that time will be coming will be when they will not be able to do a damn thing about it and that will be their heritage…..Egotists’ nightmares.

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    • Now, my dear Roger … just why are you in a mood? Have you been fighting on Facebook again? Take a deep breath, Roger … better yet, step outside in the garden and take a deep breath of fresh air, look at the newly-greened trees … oh look! There’s a gorgeous hummingbird! Oooohhh … and smell those wildflowers … see the bees? Isn’t spring wonderful? 🌼🌻 🌺 🌹 🌷

      To your point, though, yes … someday they will be dead and gone (tomorrow would be good) and I can only imagine how history will treat Trump & his minions. But unfortunately, that is of little consolation to the mother in Los Angeles whose child is sick and the doctor won’t see him for they have no insurance and no money. Or the family who has to decide whether to pay the rent, buy food, or pay the electricity bill. And yet, he has risen in the polls once again. Sigh.

      I think I hear Karlyn calling for you … 📲 🏃

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      • It’s Arketre who influences me at times; we’ve cooked up some really tough stuff later on. She may look sweet and wholesome, she may have a caring side to those who deserve her affection, but she can ‘bring the hurt’ times ten!
        Yeh I do need to follow Karlyn up a tree.
        But we don’t get hummingbirds in the UK!
        But I digress, sometimes the anger at hypocrisy, inequality and brazen insensitivity just bubbles over….🐺
        Then I go and do stuff 💫

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        • NO Hummingbirds in the UK??? That’s terrible! So sad … they are such fun to watch.

          Yes, my friend … I understand all too well how that goes. Just take care of Roger, okay? As you always tell me that “the world needs Jill”, I will say the same to you … the world needs Roger. And most especially, Sheila needs Roger. And so do I!

          Hugs!!! 💐

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          • Too cold for the little guys, not the right plants. We have cheeky robins, tuneful blackbirds, cocky magpies that strut around and gangs of crowds that congregate near innocent cats and you can almost hear:
            ‘Hey pussy-cat! What’s up. Not sayin’ nuthin’ Cat got your tongue? Haha’
            And thank you Jill for the kind comments.🌺 🌸 🌼 🌻

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            • Hah! Sounds like quite a little community there! When we have sunflowers growing tall in the front “yard” (if a 2′ x 6′ area can be sad to constitute a yard), we get both hummingbirds and some sort of very small yellow birds. The moggies sit in the window for hours, chattering and hissing at them. This is why I have to wash my living room windows every week, for they claw and paw at the glass trying to get at those little birdies. You’d think that eventually they would figure out that they cant get through the glass, but so far they are still clueless. 😹

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                • I have a good one for you. A few weeks ago, we were leaving for our usual Saturday outing — lunch and errands — and as I backed the car out, 3 of the 7 were in the window watching us leave, which is typical. We got to the corner and Chris remembered she had forgotten to unplug her curling iron, so I turned around, came back home … nary a kittie in the windows. Chris came in to unplug her curling iron and came back out laughing. “What’s funny?” “The kitties … they were literally DANCING in the middle of the floor when I went in!!!” They lead secret lives, I tell ya! They party when we are gone!!! 😸😸😸😸😸😸😸

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  7. Great, and sad post. Trump and the Repukes are truly a despicable, moral-less group of human beings. That those who will be hurt the most by Trump’s “food stamp” edict is very telling of our country. “And yes, this means that some of the biggest victims of Trump’s obsession with cutting “welfare” will be the very people who put him in office.” This quote from above says it all. I shake with rage over this man and what his minions in the GOP are doing to our country. How can it be fixed when those hurt most continue to vote for people like Trump? It is baffling and frightening.

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    • It is indeed baffling and frightening. I have pondered at great length ever since the election how people could have been so blind. But worse yet, after everything he has done, how can he still have supporters? I have had people tell me he is giving them hope again, and I just shake my head and walk away. Are they truly so stupid? Some people believe that change … any change … will make everything better. But the thing is, things aren’t so bad here to begin with. And they could be much better if we taxed the ‘haves’ and made them pay their fair share so that we could provide such ‘luxuries’ as health care, food, shelter to the lower income families. Sigh. I think I am beginning to lean more and more toward socialism, as I see this plutocracy becoming more and more corrupt.

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      • Me too. As a middle-aged, Midwestern, white male with a heavy Chicago accent and a look about me that shouts, “TRUMP VOTER,” I get a lot of similar type people who truly are Trump voters sharing their views with me. I silently sit and listen to them because it is very informative. Now, granted, though I do not know EVERY Trump voter from EVERY part of the country, I do feel I’ve got a pretty good understanding of the thought processes involved in the ones I do know, and it ain’t purrty. There’s a sense of entitlement in them that makes them feel rage that America is becoming more diverse and accepting of said diversity. There’s a need, a rage-filled need, to win and destroy all those they see as different than them with any means necessary. As long as THEY come out ahead, in their minds at least, whatever Trump does to assure victory is fine. There is a deep, deep underlining racism and sense of “whites being repressed” in them–far more than polls and the media say. Few people will say blatantly racist things to TV reporters or in poll questions, but, while having a few beers with a perceived fellow Trump supporter, the “n” word and other such words are bantered about freely. Believe me, they are. The rage and sense of white entitlement in these folks is difficult to describe without seeming like I’m exaggerating. I’m not. Since 2015, I’ve spoken, or been spoken to, by dozens upon dozens of Trump supporting white, Midwestern men, and the song is always the same. “It’s THOSE PEOPLE’S fault the country is awful”. (Even though it really isn’t). “It’s Trump and Trump alone who can save us from this crap! He tells it like it is. I LOVE the guy. Who cares what he does privately. He’s there representing US.” No. No, he’s not. He’s using the hate and anger inside these people to justify his efforts to make himself absolute dictator of America and the GOP is helping him. Hitler did this. Mussolini did this. Tyrants behave this way.
        I see the Trump supporter as a lost cause, an obstacle we need to unfortunately overcome to keep what happened in pre-WW2 Europe from happening here. We can only do that by voting and convincing others, who feel uncomfortable about what is happening, to vote too. We must educate those who are open to learning and make every effort we can to free ourselves from the tyranny Trump and the GOP represent. I will not live in a theocracy of any kind, Muslim OR Christian. I will not quietly sit by while the rich suck the life from our nation by refusing to pay taxes and creating a welfare system for themselves that makes Uncle Sam look like their own personal Santa. This is a war, a psychological one only at this time, but one that will only get uglier and more violent the longer we sit by and watch a party of tyrants with their orange leader take over our land, a land that was made for you AND me and not for just Trump and his cronies. $Amen$

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        • Like you, I have attempted conversations with a number of Trump supporters and finally gave up, for they do not listen, they refuse to consider anything we say, and present no logical answers to serious questions. I finally figured out that I was wasting time, breath and emotion on a lost cause. And, like you, I fear facing the same situation that Germany did in the 1930s. There are many differences between our situation today and Germany’s then, but still, there are some similarities. I don’t worry much about a theocracy, for first of all, Trump himself is not religious — it is all for show and to appease his base. Second, data shows that more and more young people, millennials, are eschewing religion … perhaps they see the enormous hypocrisy that almost all religion has built into it today? But I am very much convinced that we are already well on our way to a plutocracy, and I see only disaster if we don’t make some changes very soon. I have hopes for November, but, as I’ve mentioned before, also grave concerns. I suspect that this administration and Congress are holding back on some of what they would like to do, pending the mid-terms, and if the GOP retains control of both House and Senate after November, we will see even more aggressive cuts to social welfare programs and other things, such as environmental.

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          • “Second, data shows that more and more young people, millennials, are eschewing religion..” Very true, but it’s the evangelicals who are now having Trump put federal judges in everywhere who support their idiotic ideas. Roe v Wade will be challenged in the Supreme Court within the next ten years. It Trump puts even one more right-wing nutter on it, it will be overturned–a HUGE step toward a Christian theocracy. Trump isn’t religious, but, like you said, his minions are so he gives them what they want to keep ’em happy. Young people are very progressive and against most of this crap, but most do not vote. Therein lies the rub. If they do not vote now, in 20 or so years, when it’s the Mike Pences and the Jerry Farewell types running all branches of our government, they’ll wish they had. People simply must take the threat Trump poses seriously and VOTE the GOP out! i really hope that happens.

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            • You are right about the court … my fingers are tightly crossed that Justices Kennedy and Ginsburg are able to hold on for … well, another 3 years. Or at least until the Senate is not under GOP control. Even today, if Roe v Wade came to the Court, I would fear its demise. As to the young people voting … or not … I agree that historically they haven’t, but after Parkland and their justified outrage, I think we may well see a much greater number of young people at the polls. And I’d bet even money they won’t be voting for republicans! I think the group I’m most concerned about getting motivated to vote are minorities. First, they have that “what’s the point” view, understandably, and second, some states are scrambling to limit minorities access to polling places, enact stricter voting I.D. laws, etc. But yes, I do see your point about how easily we could end up with a theocracy, and it’s frightening.

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  8. Hey, Jill, please check out the post by dinobeano dated April 4th: Paul Kkrugman: What’s the Matter with Trumpland. I think you might find it worth reblogging.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Damning post, Jill, but how many in Appalachia are actually going to be exposed to it, and what it says. That is what the Repubes are counting on. You need people going down there and explaining it go them face-to-face. But don’t send people in suits or dresses, no one will trust them. Send those who left the area because they realize what is going on. Send coal miners and farmers and such, people who have felt the pinch and realize it can be stopped. Send people that the Repubes call “White Trash.” They are the ones who can turn this debacle around.

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    • You make excellent points. Methinks you should come here and offer your advisory services to the Democratic National Committee, for they sure won’t think of these things on their own.

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      • Being Canadian, I doubt they would listen to me. But what I say is just common sense. You might impress somone by standing there in a $10,000 suit, but that won’t make anyone listen to you. You are not common folk, Nor will they listen if you disguise yourself as someone you are not. Then you are untrustworthy.
        You must be down-to-earth to talk to people of the earth, and have them listen.
        But if the DNC wants to listen, I’m more than willing to give them suggestions…

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          • If you did, I would be proud of you, and you could blog about it daily.
            But!
            Don’t forget about Freedom Summer, 1964, and what happened to James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michel Sweeney. Dastardly Threatman would not be above having the past repeated.

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            • True. But y’know … I am old and in poor health anyway, so in truth, if I thought that in so doing I could make a difference, I just might be willing to take the risk. But I somehow doubt that people are in the mood to listen to anybody these days and while I write fairly well, when it comes to actually talking to people face-to-face, I am less effective … in fact, if talking to a crowd or to people I don’t know, I stutter worse than Mel Tillis!

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              • Hey, Jill,
                You have to do what is best for you. But if our little conversation inspires someone else to do something I would love to hear that someone is going. The Deadly Terrorizer needs to be fought on all fronts, and the south is just one of them. As a prelude to writing my last comment on this page I read the whole story about the deaths of Chaney, Goodman and Schwermer, and I could not believe how many people were involved in the conspiracy to murder them. Nor could I believe the brutality inflicted upon Chaney BEFORE they finally shot him. I can only hope their descendants don’t hate the amount their predecessors did, but I would not count on it. I know we started out talking about Appalachia, where something like 80% of people voted for DT if my memory serves me correctly. But my target area has since grown, and I would love to see people down there covering the south-eastern states.
                My health is not good either, and I am still waiting for surgery, but there is need of counter-Trumpists in those areas..

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                • I well remember the incident of Chaney, Goodman and Schwermer, and have watched the movie based on the incident, Mississippi Burning, a few times. It breaks my heart every time. Here’s how I view it, my friend. There are battles to be fought on many fronts right now. Each of us has something to offer, some skill or strong suit, while we may lack others. For me, traveling would be very difficult, and public speaking is definitely NOT my strong suit. But I write fairly well. So, I leave the physical aspect to those younger and more able, and i try to stimulate thought among the masses with my writing. Now, if the time ever comes that I can see benefit to me traveling to Tennessee or Michigan to meet with a group where I might make a real difference, then i would be gone in a heartbeat. But for now, I think my contribution is the writing I do, both on this blog and in the two online publications that publish my work. These days I spend 12-14 hours at it … and that’s 7 days a week. I swear I didn’t work this hard as a Comptroller!!! I would literally give my life if doing so would stop Trump, but as I have only one life to give, I must choose my battles wisely.

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                  • I understand completely. I too wish I could do a lot more, but as you say, age and health get in the way, not to mention lack of money for getting around. My income is just over $1000 cdn per month, and that is barely livable. And my blog is aimed at spiritual topics, and I don’t have room for politics, so mostly I have my comments do my talking for me. It isn’t much, I know, but at least I hope it is something…

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                    • Damn, rawgod! Your income is just over half what mine is … I don’t know how you are even managing. Since my daughter, granddaughter and I share a residence, we pool our money, so I’m in better shape than if I had to live alone, but with the cost of my monthly insulin, there is no way I could pay rent and buy food if I had to live on my own. I don’t know how you do it, my friend.

                      Your comments are most always thoughtful and thought-provoking … you’ve led me down a path in my posts a few times. I think you and I both are doing the best we can, and that’s all we can do. Any word yet on the surgery?

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                    • Still no word, unfortunately. Waiting is a price we pay for free medical coverage. But our insulin is covered for us, and all the paraphernalia that goes with it. As are most of the other meds I am on, and some are very costly.
                      My spouse is still on medical pension till she turns 65, and that is how we survive. We don’t want for food or shelter, so we are okay for now. In this political climate, though, if we lived in the States, I don’t think we would…

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                    • Well, I hope they don’t wait too long! Yes, my friends in the UK all tell me that everything is covered for them, too.

                      You’re right — I think the cost of living is probably higher here than in Canada, especially in and around cities. Our monthly rent, for example, is $1,060, and our electric bill is $260 per month.

                      You should write a bestseller and then you’d be set for life! 😉

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                    • I’ve already written it, but no publisher will ever see it, lol. Early in life I wanted to be a writer, but I got caught in the agent/publisher game,, and I ended up in the slush pile so often I gave up.
                      Probably I’m just not a good enough writer, though I think I am. I just refuse to play the publishing game. I wrote stories that had good endings, or one that had tragedy but we’re not shoot’em-up bang bangs, and I was told nobody what’s to read those kind of stories. I refused to change them just to please some violence-junkie asswipe. And I stopped sending my fiction out. I wrote it for myself. Until finally I needed a catharsis after writing a real sad tale, and wrote a horror-story novella just to recharge my batteries, and never sent it out to anyone. That one could probably have used an editor’s help, but I just hid it online and left it there. I’ve never even tried to rework it, it sits there “raw” as the day I wrote it and I have no intention of ever going back to it. It scared me what could come out of my pacifistic mind.

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                    • Have you considered self-publishing? Amazon offers some great tools … and you may also want to check out Smashwords.com. It does require some self-promotion, but there are lots of online resources that can help you with that. At least you’ll have the satisfaction of seeing your hard work “in print.” 🙂

                      Just a thought …

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • I thought about it, but then I would have to reach into the past. I haven’t had the writing bug lately, but we will see in the future. I go through phases, and sometimes I have to write, then it just disappears. My present project is a spiritual autobiography, but it is in limbo. When next the bug bites, maybe I can finish it…
                      Thank you for t.he ideas.

                      Liked by 2 people

                    • If you do ever decide to self-publish, I can direct you to a few of my readers who do a lot toward helping new authors self-publish. Not pushing you at all … just let me know if I can ever help.

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                    • Thanks, Jill. There was a time, but my ego doesn’t need boosting anymore. However, if I ever get off my butt and finish my spiritual biography that I will want to publish, as long as I can hive it away for free. True spirituality should never be connected to money, as it is freely available in every mind, as long as you are willing to search for it.

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                    • Yes, what comes out of my mind sometimes frightens me and I think, “now where did THAT come from”. If you ever feel like sharing any of your stories, I would love to read one. No pressure … just saying …

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                    • Hi Jill, and whoever might be reading this,
                      If you are interested in reading my works, goto:
                      rawgod.tripod.com/id23.htm
                      The first page is usually a teaser, but can be avoided by hitting a title at either the start or the end of the page. There is also an index on the right side of the page, should you want to see anything else. I would suggest bookmarking the above page because it will take you almost everywhere you might want to go. This website, which I no longer have access to change, was my first ever try at building my own website, and at times I tried to play tricks on the expected visitors, and that might be one reason it was never successful. But the real reason, I guess, was that I didn’t make it interesting enough.
                      Should you want to make any comments of any kind, don’t bother using any of the email links attached to the website. They are all dead now. I can best be reached at: gewcolo@gmail.com but don’t expect a reply right away, I only check my email about once a week. It is no longer a priority in my life…

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Just one little note, Jill. I was a somewhat different person when I wrote the two prose pieces. They are both triple XXX rated. If I were to rewrite them today I would probably change that. Please forgive me.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Ahhhh … thanks for the forewarning! I haven’t had a chance to look at it yet, for today has been a nightmare, but I will this weekend. And I will be prepared for the XXX-rating. 😉

                      Like

  10. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    Can’t say it any better … I do hope that they “wake up”!
    It’s not only Drumpf … it’s all the other complicit, greedy, unprincipled ‘people in Congress!!
    ‘This means that some of the biggest victims of Drumpf’s obsession with cutting “welfare” will be the very people who put him in office. Did they know what they were voting for?
    No, this is about petty cruelty turned into a principle of government. It’s about privileged people who look at the less fortunate and don’t think, “There but for the grace of God go I”; they just see a bunch of losers. They don’t want to help the less fortunate; in fact, they get angry at the very idea of public aid that makes those losers a bit less miserable.’

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Quote: “/this is about petty cruelty turned into a principle of government. ” /Indeed, right on the “money” this one. Sociopaths piloting a military empire run amuck. Will November 6 see a difference made? I think not. Trump and his gang of gangsters is an American addiction. Prediction: Give it a decade, a hundred years, it doesn’t matter, things can only get worse for America.  It’s an American problem just as the Nazis were a German problem. The few who would fix it, or who challenge it will soon be silenced.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Um … a bit of a hopeless, drastic outlook, eh? I have concerns about the November mid-terms, but I have not given up all hope. I cannot afford to give in to despair and assume that everything from here is downhill, else I would not be able to even get out of bed in the mornings. And the Nazis didn’t last forever in Germany, nor will the Trumpians last forever in the U.S. In fact, I would really like to see it begin to turn around in this lifetime, for in my next life I am planning to be a wolf, and won’t care about politics at all. 🐺

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