Who Values Diversity?

I found these survey results, reported in an article by Brookings Institute, to be interesting … and depressing.  Not necessarily surprising, for they support what I have believed to be the case for some time now.  Take a look for yourself …

According to a Gallup survey released on July 18, the American people now regard immigration as the single most important problem facing the country, and the share of the population expressing this view stands at the highest level ever recorded. This surge of concern crosses partisan lines: the share of Republicans and Independents who name immigration as the top issue has more than tripled during the past year, and it has more than doubled among Democrats.

Although immigration is an issue trifecta, raising economic, security, and cultural concerns, recent surveys have underscored the centrality of culture, in the United States and throughout the West. Since the 1965 enactment of the momentous Hart-Cellar immigration reform bill, the share of first-generation immigrants in the U.S. population has tripled from less than five percent to about 14 percent. By 2050 at the latest, non-Hispanic whites will be a minority.

Unlike most demographic projections, this one has received wide publicity and has evoked diverse reactions. A Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) survey released earlier this week found that while 64 percent of Americans regard increasing demographic diversity as mostly positive, there are deep partisan divisions: Democrats believe that it’s mostly positive by an overwhelming margin of 85 to 13 percent, as do Independents by 59 to 34 percent, but 50 percent of Republicans regard it as mostly negative, compared to only 43 percent who favor it.

A closer look at the data reveals the sources of this cleavage. There are no gender differences, and age differences are much smaller than expected, with 57 percent of Americans 65 and older taking a positive view of rising diversity. Racial and ethnic differences are significant but not dispositive: 78 percent of both African-Americans as Hispanics see diversity as a plus, but so do 56 percent of white Americans. Much the same holds for regional differences: although 72 percent of respondents from the West and Northeast approve of increasing diversity, so do 60 percent of Midwesterners and 57 percent of Southerners.

The key drivers of partisan division are educational and religious differences among white Americans. Sixty-nine percent of whites with a BA or more have a mostly positive view of demographic diversity, compared to just 50 percent of whites without college degrees. As for religion, 52 percent of white Catholics and 56 percent of white mainline Protestants think rising diversity is mostly positive. By contrast, just 42 percent of white evangelical Protestants favor these changes, while 52 percent think they’re mostly negative. Two-thirds of whites without college degrees supported Republicans in the 2016 elections, as did eight in 10 white evangelicals.

The bottom line: the core of the Republican base is deeply uncomfortable with the central demographic trend of our time, which public policy is powerless to resist. Even if the U.S. slammed shut the doors of immigration, differences in birth rates between native-born citizens and newer arrivals would ensure the steady erosion of the population’s white majority, albeit at a slower pace.

Across the Atlantic, the rising tide of immigration has triggered similar fears, expressed in the language of national identity. A Pew Research Center analysis released on July 19 under the heading “It’s not just the economy” shows that supporters of the populist surge throughout Europe are far more likely than others to believe that only those who are born in their respective European countries and have family ties in these countries are truly “one of us.” In Italy, Germany, and France, about three-quarters of the League, the AfD, and the National Front party members espouse these views, as do 55 percent of Dutch populists and 40 percent of Swedish populists. Similarly large shares of European populists believe that their culture is superior to others and that Islam is incompatible with their values.

In both the United States and Europe, these changes feed a shared sense of national decline. In every European country Pew surveyed, supporters of populist parties are far more likely to say that life in their country is worse than it was 50 years ago for people like them. Donald Trump’s “Make America Great Again” brilliantly targeted these feeling of decline among Americans who feel displaced in the land of their birth. Suitably adjusted, this slogan would be equally effective in Europe—even in Germany, where many populists believe that their country has apologized more than enough for its past misdeeds.

I do not understand why it matters what colour skin a person has.  I don’t at all understand why it matters what group is a ‘minority’ or a ‘majority’.  And I damn sure don’t understand why anybody thinks a person with pale skin has more value than one with darker skin.  Why does there have to be “us” and “them”? The people in this nation have more important concerns, more important things to waste their time worrying about.  The environment, health care, poverty, global trade, our damaged foreign relations.  But apparently there are some groups that believe they are better than the rest of us, always have been and always will be, and that, folks, does not bode well for the future of the one race we all belong to — the human race.

85 thoughts on “Who Values Diversity?

  1. I often wonder if whites think if they become the minority they will be treated like they treated the blacks and the Native Americans. If that’s so, then no one can convince me these people don’t KNOW they’re complicit in the whole us and them thing…

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    • You know what, my friend? I’ve never thought about it like that before, but I think you might just have a really good point there! Rather like the prison guard who abuses the prisoner, and then one day the tables are turned. Hmmmm … you’ve given me something to ponder on. 🤔

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        • Seriously??? I will never forget a year or so ago when one of my (former) republican friends said that if I would try thinking instead of pondering, perhaps I would be smarter!!! 😀 😀 😀 I need a pondering place. But wait … every place for me is a pondering place!

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          • Brings up an interesting question… Is there a difference between thinking and pondering? I tend to feel that people who “think” do so inside a box and can easily turn into sheeple, led here and there when they’re told what to believe. Now ponderers, on the other hand, think outside the box and can see lots of different possibilities and solutions. But that’s just me…

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            • I never thought about that one before, but now that you mention it …

              Perhaps ‘thinking’ is what enables us to survive … to make intelligent decisions, such as what career to pursue, what to fix for supper, whether to stop at a red light, etc. But pondering is the thing that enables people to come up with new ideas, to put a man on the moon, to find a cure for Ebola, etc. Good point you make! I shall ponder it further!

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  2. My comment above about separate countries was partly in jest because keeping it one is a form of diversity too. But it would be nice to live in a country free of bigotry and racism and the religious right fanaticism. That diversity I could do without.

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    • Oh I know your comment was tongue-in-cheek, and frankly I periodically say the same thing out of frustration. It would be nice to live without bigotry in any form, to live accepting people just as they are. But … I suspect that will never quite happen, though I do think we can do a heck of a lot better than we’re doing now!

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  3. Diversity never means to me a glorification of separate cultures. Common unity demands we live together in peace no matter what label everyone has. In the Republican case , by rejecting diversity, they foment racism on a widespread scale.

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    • Quite true. And immigrants should not be forced to give up their own culture in order to be accepted. There is so much we can all learn from each other … what a waste to try to make everybody be just the same!

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      • I’ve completely lost track of the question that was addressed to me, and I can’t seem to find it here, in the list of comments… and I don’t know what I wrote either, unless it’s the swimming pool analogy. OK, so as a sentient, self-aware and intelligent race, we need to wake up, wise up and live up to our innate mental abilities. What does it mean? Recognition that our “civilization” has run aground and it’s too massive to ever be floated again. She won’t sail no more, cap’n, and since you were piloting it, we fire you (leaders) and we the people will now decide how we will fare in this new situation. So we declare, to ourselves, to each other, that we will no longer have gods, rulers or leaders: we don’t need them since obviously they express worse values than the ones we would prefer to live by. We declare that we are a people, not “races” or “nations” but a people on one world and we simply accept each other as we are and learn to make that work. No more crap. Anyone who tries to establish ‘order’ is tune out, shut down, ignored. This is the really big step for Earthians: to learn to interact with each other and with all life in a compassionate way, rejecting any other way that intervenes with our goal. Rejecting one-upmanship, acquisitiveness, competition.
        Can that be done? Yes, through great self-discipline, but since nothing else involving force has ever worked, wouldn’t it be wise to try it? Mary, Jill, that’s my answer and I’ll die knowing it is the right one. The beauty of this is, it is entirely doable, by anyone, for it is expressed in will and deeds, not in words or movements. That it won’t happen, except in too rare examples often posted on this blog, does not equate to it being wrong.

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  4. The Empire is imploding, a perhaps long term, most likely short term, inevitability. Sociopaths and fools usually join hands to rule the end of most empires unless that end comes about from external attacks or invasions. America is ruled by sociopaths and fools therefore…? The nation as a result is plunging into what I’d call dissociative disorder. The statistical responses you offer to the perceived problem of “immigration” proves this: they actually mean nothing but that no one knows anything solid. Yes, we want diversity, but we’re afraid of immigrants is like saying, yes, I want to go for a swim but I don’t want to get wet. The solution: well, why don’t we drain the pool, then we can go in it without getting wet. That such a “solution” totally misses the point of the exercise seems lost upon the would-be swimmers.

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    • As recently as a month ago, I might have argued your point, but after these last 2-3 weeks, I have come to wonder if there is any sane ending to this saga. You’re analogy about the swimming pool is apt … rather the same as that age-old expression about having one’s cake and eating it too. Sigh.

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  5. If we deport all republicans and tRump supporters, we’d have a much better country. #deportrepublicans2russia MAFA Make America Free Again. Deport republicans today; let all others in after vetting them calmly, legally, and with compassion. $Amen$

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      • Ahhh, but think of all the fun we would miss out on! Just joking, but seriously, that is what many of the evangelicals would like to do … make this a white, Christian nation and get rid of all others. We gain and learn from those from different cultures, and I wouldn’t trade the diversity for anything. But, that said, we simply must find a way to live together, to respect and embrace those differences rather than to denigrate them. Sigh. Wouldn’t you think that as long as the human race has been around, we would have figured these things out by now?

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  6. Excellent post. Secular education is the key, but I don’t see that happening any time soon. I can only hope religious fanaticism doesn’t spread overseas because that seems to be the second thing driving all this in a negative way.

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    • You are quite right that secular education is key. The evangelicals have Trump in their pocket, and it is their goal to take this nation from a secular and diverse one to a white, Christian nation. Not a place I would want to live, nor would I be welcomed into their fold.

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  7. There is discontent amongst the masses and that always brings a tendency to blame outsiders who have come to share the resources available. Crime, low wages, poor health and poor living standards will always bring on this kind of thinking. It is far easier to blame others for all that is wrong.

    Just the other day, I was out walking when a large black man said hello to me. I smiled and said ‘Good Morning.’ He stopped and pointed behind him at a lady sitting on the back of a boat. He had stopped to admire the craft when she shouted ‘What are you staying at ‘N……..’ She had used the word that most black people find demeaning and racially denigrating. The man said that he had tried to explain himself, but she threatened to call the police. He was obviously shaken. He needed some reassurance from a bystander that he wasn’t in the wrong, especially if the police suddenly descended on him. I felt bad for him. He didn’t look threatening, nor were his words any different to those I would use. I gave him my best commiserations. There but for the grace of my colour go I! It just isn’t right.

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    • “Crime, low wages, poor health and poor living standards will always bring on this kind of thinking.” Which is very true, but the thing is that here in the U.S., none of those are prevalent. AND … to the extent they do exist, it isn’t because of immigrants or African-Americans or even robots taking jobs … it is because the wealthy 1% hoard every dime they can get their hands on and have no conscience regarding the income inequality we see constantly getting wider.

      I am moved near to tears by your story of the black man. No, it certainly isn’t right! It is shallow, racist and ignorant. I really thought the U.S. was the only place that sort of thing happened … I thought the Brits were better than that. Sigh.

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      • Unfortunately, racism is alive and active in Britain.

        Yes, we do have a lot of crime and it does seem to be committed by people of colour… Asian ethnicity in particular seems to be involved in terrorism and sexual crimes, as are the increasing number of acid attacks…just lately a three year old boy was attacked with acid by grown men in the middle of a popular discount store. The blatent crimes perpetrated here in the UK have made people very nervous.

        The black man I spoke to was a very tall, muscled man. He was angry and upset when we spoke, with him asking me “is your blood not the same as mine?” I understood his frustration at being singled out as having some kind of ulterior motive, but with so much violence in Britain, I also understood the wariness of the woman. What is not acceptable is the words she used. There is absolutely no reason to be rude, not in any situation. All she had to do was say hello and engage with him. I do that with all kinds of teenagers who are nearly always trouble when they congregate in gangs alongside locks on the canal. Politeness and respect diffuses an awful lot of aggression and everyone, regardless of colour, age, beliefs and status should be treated with the same human decency. Fear whipped up by the political condition and media who need the story, serves only to separate and divide us. I believe it in large part to be the reason people do not reach their full potential.
        We really do need the breakdown of this particular civilization and for a new, healthier one to take it’s place, because we are losing the battle against corrupt powers that want to keep us ignorant and subservient. Racism is only the tip of a very large iceberg of fear, revenge, and hatreds that lurk beneath the still waters. I wish it weren’t so.

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  8. It was in the early 2000’s that I first heard and jotted down the term “Eracism”…the removal from existence of the belief that one race is superior to another. A notion that has never been embraced, as proven by this survey on immigration. A part of the white population appears to fear that they will become watered down into extinction. Diversity becomes a dirty word to those that fear its touching and affecting their lives. I am reminded of Audre Lorde’s words : “It is not our differences that divide us. It is our INABILITY to recognize, accept and celebrate those differences.” Thank-you!

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    • Until reading your comment, I had never heard the term ‘eracism’, so of course I Googled it, and found out that there is actually a group founded in New Orleans by this name. Their motto is: We seek ways, through person-to-person communication, to show that we are committed to treating fellow human beings of all colors with love and respect. I was encouraged. I wonder why there aren’t branches of this group in every city across the U.S.?

      Y’know … that portion of the white population that is so bloomin’ concerned about being ‘watered down’, or becoming a minority … perhaps it would be best if they did follow the course of the dinosaurs, for they withhold progress and add little of value to society. Have they all forgotten that their own ancestors were immigrants? Have they forgotten the words on the base of the Statue of Liberty? Have they forgotten how to care about others? Great quote, by the way!

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      • While we of the West tend to focus on white supremacism and racism, let’s not forget that the very same problems exist everywhere: no one is exempt from the effects of racism, religious bigotry and misogyny, these being the three major “sins” of mankind. So we need to recognize that these “sins” are in fact addictions, sicknesses and we all have them except that for some of us, our moral “immune system” can hold them in check. For others, it doesn’t work. Through a “school of hard knocks” I found a cure for my addiction. I call it compassion. I still think it can work for anyone who honestly engages it. It is a solution and I don’t know of any better one.

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      • I remember growing up in the 50s and 60s when prejudice against minorities was expressed openly and was socially acceptable. As a kid, I was ignorant of history and content that these attitudes made me part of s superior group. Education + interacting with minorities changed my thinking. I remember as a youth I was a male chauvinist pig – today I’m a feminist. I guess I grew up. Some people don’t, and some have to put others down in order to feel good about themselves. Nations that limit immigration and or keep their minorities disadvantaged are robbing themselves of precious natural resources. I understand it and it scares me.

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  9. I think FEAR is at the heart of the matter. If you don’t know any immigrants, it’s easier to stay ignorant and fearful. I live in a diverse area. I have friends who were refugees from Iraq: Assyrians. The horror stories they have shared make me wonder why ANYONE would NOT wish to help them???

    There’s a genocide happening based on the fact that they are ASSYRIAN. There are people who are trying to wipe the entire Assyrian race off the planet. One of my friends explained that it’s not like he can “convert,” to change his religion from Christianity to something else to try to escape the purge of his race, because he looks Assyrian: pale-skinned, blue-eyed, auburn hair. This is NOT what Americans think of when they think of a Middle-Eastern person, however, HUMANS come in 1000’s of different skin tones.

    And just because Assyrians don’t fit American’s preconceived, Hollywood notions, doesn’t mean there’s any preferential treatment from Americans. He’s now an American citizen, with a job, car, and house. And he’s still treated TERRIBLY, like a potential terrorist. Umm…no. He’s a refugee. He escaped with his mother and family with only the things they could carry. And then…they split up his family, because that’s what happens to refugees. You go what country will take you. He has family in Canada, Sweden, Australia, and in the United States (Michigan) because they split up refugee families with adult children. For “security” reasons.

    You rarely hear about these stories in the news, but this is the reality that’s happening in this world.

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    • You are so right that fear is the heart of the matter, and Trump & Co have created that fear by referring to Mexicans as criminals and Muslims as terrorists, not to mention telling his followers that the immigrants are taking jobs. All falsehoods, but there are those who are easily swayed. I, too, have dear friends living next door who are Syrian refugees and they are the most kind, generous and loving people I have ever known! I actually live in a neighborhood where about 35% or the population are Middle-Eastern refugees, and I get along great with them all. Sadly, there is a lady across the street who takes perverse pleasure in taunting them, especially the women for wearing their hijabs. Americans are, I believe, the most arrogant people on the globe.

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  10. The educational divide tells the story. When we become enlightened through higher learning, we can rise above our primitive tribal nature. In this complex global society of ours, it is imperative to educate the populace. Unfortunately, powerful political interests are opposed to quality secular education for the masses. If we can’t overcome that obstacle, then the situation will only get worse.

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    • I fully concur that education is the bulk of the answer. The other part, though, is that religion is an ever-increasingly loud voice that promotes bigotry in all its forms. Trump gives the religious right a platform and they have made good use of it, convincing their masses that this should be a white, Christian nation. I propose we make it mandatory to spend an equal amount of time in college as is spent in church. Maybe it would open some minds?

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      • The religious right is trying to change our education system by doing away with public schools and making private Christian oriented ones for those with money. Colleges will be infiltrate well. We are headed towards a Christian Sharia nation. The Supreme Court and other judges trump has selected tells the whole story. It’s ultimately a power grab for the white and wealthy.

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        • You hit the nail on the head. Interesting, isn’t it, that we hear people who claim that Sharia Law is the root of all evil, and yet they are trying to implement the same system here, just with a different set of tenets. DeVos’ experiment with charter schools in Michigan was a total failure, so now she’s going to try it out on the entire nation! Brilliant! What could possibly go wrong, eh? 🙄

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      • In addition to enlightening people to be less tribal, education also has another effect. From: http://www.pewforum.org/2017/04/26/in-america-does-more-education-equal-less-religion/

        Among all U.S. adults, college graduates are considerably less likely than those who have less education to say religion is “very important” in their lives: Fewer than half of college graduates (46%) say this, compared with nearly six-in-ten of those with no more than a high school education (58%).

        Highly educated Americans also are less inclined than others to say they believe in God with absolute certainty and to pray on a daily basis. And, when asked about their religious identity, college graduates are more likely than others to describe themselves as atheists or agnostics (11% of college grads vs. 4% of U.S. adults with a high school education or less).

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        • That is very interesting, and my first thought was, “I wonder why?” But then I pondered it for a bit, and I suspect that with more education, especially a liberal arts education, people learn to question things, to look for reason, for logic, which makes the blind faith required for religion a bit difficult. I have long agreed with Marx’ calling religion the “opiate of the masses”, and I think that what we are seeing today confirms that. Thanks for sharing this … it gave me some food for thought.

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        • Very interesting article. I wonder now with education becoming less available and affordable to the middle and lower classes and with religion trying to force their way and beliefs into education, will these statistics change?

          Seems religion is pretty entrenched for some time yet and a thought struck me to ask you.

          In the Mideast are there colleges and how much religion is part of the education there?

          Do they even teach physics, cosmology, biology, geology, etc.

          Does the Muslim world also believe that the earth is 6000 yrs old? Or flat?
          And I would imagine the war torn areas have little to no education.

          I ask because I worry that the Mideast mirrors what we might become.

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          • Good questions. There is a relevant difference between secular education and religious education. That doesn’t necessarily mean that religious schools are generally inferior, but it does mean that certain subjects (e.g. evolution) are either not taught or are taught with some bias. Furthermore, secular schools teach the history of religion while religious schools teach the precepts of religion.

            For example, the grammar and math I learned in Catholic school was just as good as I learned in public school; but, it wasn’t until later when I only attended public schools that the breadth of my education and social awareness increased rather dramatically.

            Theocracy in America? You betcha. That’s what fundamentalist Christian dominionism is all about. First, they gain political power; and, second, they dismantle secular public education through privatization schemes (e.g. charter schools) and other means.

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          • In truth, Mary, I do not know the answers to all of your questions, but they are good questions and I am curious. So, I have made not to return to this comment in a day or two when I have done a bit of research. I do know that there are colleges and universities in the Middle East and yes, they do teach the sciences, technology and social sciences. How much religion plays a role these days, I’m not certain. I do know that not all that long ago, women were not welcomed into the universities, but that may well have changed. I’ll get back to you in a few days!

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  11. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    KUDOS ….. that is it: THE HUMAN RACE!!
    ‘But apparently there are some groups that believe they are better than the rest of us, always have been and always will be, and that, folks, does not bode well for the future of the one race we all belong to – the human race.’

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  12. As an immigrant, I get that people in whatever country feel “threatened” by immigrants. One thing for sure none of them will be taking over the lodge, anytime soon.

    Economic immigration is not the same as immigration due to war pressures. Which is where the two groups diverge. At the same time they are being used to jump the lines and bureaucracy of economic immigration. Immigrants bring work ethic, etc. For they are desperate to catch up. The wars waged by USA since 1940’s are behind much of it. The US’s support for certain right wind dictatorships adds to it. Take Mexico for example. 90% of the land is owned by 5% of landed gentry. The USA has supported and aided this disparate statistic and this is repeated around our globe. The Oligarchs retain their power … Cheers Jamie

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    • For once, I agree with all you say! 😉 If the U.S. succeeds in banning and deporting immigrants, they will find themselves in a predicament of their own making, for how many of those lily-white bigots would be willing to work at picking fruit for 12 hours a day in the hot sun for a mere pittance? Or waiting tables, putting up with disgruntled customers, arrogant bosses, pinches & gropes, and all for less than minimum wage? Americans are the epitome of arrogance and I wash my hands of those who have the mistaken notion that they are superior to anybody.

      Cheers!

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  13. The “core” (Conservatives) of the Republican base is against change or anything that contradicts or opposes their close minded ideology… only two things matter to them most, their image and their wealth… 🙂

    “It is change, continuing change, inevitable change, that is the dominant factor in society today. No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.” Isaac Asimov

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    • To a large extent you are quite right, which makes me wonder how we ever came as far as we did! Most progress has been an uphill battle, but with time, we made progress. Today, though, I wonder if we will ever progress, for we seem to be moving backward.

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  14. Jill, there is a cool show on PBS called “No passport required.” The chef host travels the country to take in and celebrate the diverse foods. As a metaphor for the country, the host notes that if we did not have the diverse influence of foods, America would have a pretty boring palate. Even more directly, if we kicked illegal immigrants and DACA people out of the country, the US restaurant industry would be in a heap of hurt. To me that speaks volumes. Meyer

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    • I’ll have to check out that show! And I agree 100%, for some of my favourite foods are Mexican and Italian! And not only the restaurant industry, but agriculture as well. I wonder if those who want to kick out all the immigrants are willing to wait tables, on their feet all day long, putting up with grumpy customers, for less than minimum wage? Or spend 12 hours in the hot sun picking fruit for a pittance?

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      • Jill, I think you will like it. In our favorite Japanese steakhouse, most of the chefs are Mexican-American. But, it goes deeper than this. Numerous industries will suffer if illegal immigrants are kicked out – construction, landscaping, roofing, harvesting, restaurant, etc. My thesis is simple. For those business managers who say deport them, why did you hire them? Something to do with profit margin, maybe?

        I need to write another post about John McCain’s book, as he reminds me that there have been three very serious bipartisan Senate bills passed since 2005 fixing immigration that did not get an audience in the House. He said the Freedom Caucus and folks like the talk show hosts waylaid consideration. What ticked me off even more is Senator Marco Rubio, a member of the bipartisan gang of eight, had to run away from his biggest legislative success when he ran for President.

        Keith

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  15. Your final remark bears thought: “But apparently there are some groups that believe they are better than the rest of us, always have been and always will be, and that, folks, does not bode well for the future of the one race we all belong to — the human race.” The mistake here is that this is not a matter of belief but of conviction borne of fear. It has been with us for some time now both in this country and abroad. Much of this is the result of growing human populations but it is also a result, I think, of the lack of belief at all — belief in something that can give folks hope.

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    • Hmmm … I should know better than to wade in and disagree with a professor of philosophy … but I am a stubborn wench 🙂 I agree with you that part of it is the overpopulating of the planet, but on the part about beliefs, I might have to disagree. It seems to me that those who profess to have the strongest belief system, ie, religion, are the ones who are doing most of the hating and are the biggest bigots. They may have their beliefs to keep them warm at night, but it seems to lead them to believe that it is their appointed mission to make everyone else fit into their small little jar of norms, else get rid of those who don’t/can’t. Now mind you, I am not putting down anybody solely for their beliefs, for that is something we each have a right to. But people don’t seem content to be allowed to have their beliefs without being able to try to force them on others, hence we have racial disparity, violence, murders, wars, etc.

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    • Two sets of belief and the first are people who believe there is a better way to live for all of us and this includes and welcomes diversity and the benefits it will bring in the long run. This is not a religious belief, but a humanist belief.
      The second belief is the scourge of racism and this belief is huge and ingrained. This often is tied to fear and irrational thinking and much, but not all, is backed and propagated by religion and judging others and other lifestyles.

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  16. It’s a sad state of affairs! Our country has gone into reverse!!!! I thought we were evolving into a diverse and accepting nation! Now…we have open white supremicist running for public office! Just look at who they elected as president! It’s so, so SAD!!!!! And…..with impeachment proceedings against Rosenstein…. u can bet what’s coming next! 😢

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    • It is sad and very disappointing, but in my opinion, racism will always be there, sometimes simmering below the surface, other times on public display. Sigh. I suspect they will never manage to remove Rosenstein from office, and for the moment it is put off, but it is infuriating that they ever try!

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  17. A self- explanatory article which emphasizes human nature and how it reacts to circumstances. The fact that we are all one race is agreed by the vast majority but that does not cancel out the survival instinct. I don’t mind my neighbour getting rich as long as it’s not at my expense.
    The advance of technology has made the standard of living in the world’s richest countries beyond the wildest imagination of those who lived a mere hundred years ago. A relatively rich middle class is springing up even in poor nations like India and China which now has three hundred million new middle class citizens.
    The new middle class want specialist medicine like heart transplants and stem cell treatment is on its way while the poor have no basic hygiene, meanwhile the big muscular nations struggle for supremacy amid war and destruction.
    There are those who believe humans can effectively run the show and sort the world out but to my mind there seems to be little evidence that this will happen.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I would have to agree with your conclusion. It seems that after thousands of years, if we haven’t figured it out yet then we are unlikely to. Sigh. But, that doesn’t mean we give up and stop fighting against it.

      Like

  18. At the bottom line of every argument which challenges immigration & diversity and champions exclusivity is the cesspit of racism, no matter how they try and dress it up in weasel words, lies masking as research, or some sort of twisted vision of a race with a ‘manifest destiny’
    Once you start to target one race, one people, OR set your own above everyone else then you are on the hard-rocky pathway to your own destruction.
    Oh there are apologists (particularly in the wargaming world) who will make up all sorts of reasons why the Nazis lost the war, all to do with resources and side issues. The fact was, they embraced racial hatred, and thus brought a whole bunch of ‘lesser’ folk against them and down they went. If the Japanese Military Clique of the 1930s/40s had not become obsessed with their warped idea of Bushido Japan would not have been devastated. And so it goes on, this way and that way through history.
    A racist is a fool who cannot see they are writing their own doom in their bitterness and ignorance. Worse still they will bring innocent folk down with them.

    Liked by 2 people

    • You’ll get no arguments from me on that! What troubles me is that in the thousands of years of history, the human race still has not learned the lessons of the past. Despite the Holocaust, anti-Semitism is still going strong. Some days I think it almost feels like some deity is playing a game of Battleship with humans here on earth. “Oops … things are too quiet in that spot they call Turkey … let’s stir up something. And oh look … in the U.S., black people and white people are actually learning to live together in peace. Can’t have that … hmmm … let me sent in a huge bomb … perhaps a fat, ugly guy with really bad hair … to disrupt everything!” If we haven’t learned yet, it seems unlikely we ever will. Sigh.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Rant warning; Force 8 rising to 10……
        I agree Jill.
        This is where my political outlook kicks in. History shows us if unchecked there will always be a predilection for a portion of society to display the ignorant filth of racism, no matter how much you try and educate or discuss. Thus in comes a proper socialist govt. (as opposed to The UK Labour party….a mess)
        Under thus system one of the principal duties of the State is to react strongly against any sign of race, gender or religious hatred. Those spreading it would be arrested as terrorists and subject to a long and tough-love re-education programme to break them of this, I mean completely break them down. Any demonstrations would be met with the full weight of the state’s law enforcement. Social Media companies which allow anything to get through would be shut down until they sort it out. Part of the Security network would be employed to trawl for the stuff and where possible attack the sources.
        In short complete Intolerance of Intolerance. There is no place in a complex society for any kind of this filth which attacks and hurts the weak and the innocent.
        There would be a world of hurt for the bigot, by the time I was done they would be afraid to get out bed in the morning and if they had an ounce of sense, beg for re-education.
        Any nations considered racist would be addressed severely and support given to opposition groups and unofficial genuine observation teams.
        This filth must be eradicated.
        (And I’ve only just started……watch ‘Lectern’)

        Liked by 1 person

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