Re-defining “Liberty”

Two weeks ago, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the creation of a “religious liberty task force” to help protect the right of every American “to believe, worship and exercise their faith in the public square.”  Religious liberty … what exactly does that mean?  To me, it means the right of every person to believe as he or she sees fit, to belong to any church of their choice, or none at all.  It is, as I see it, an individual ‘right’. It is not, however, the right to inflict your own beliefs upon others.

George Marsden, a religious historian at the University of Notre Dame, describes religious liberty as ‘inclusive pluralism’, a society in which no religion is preferred over another, and all believers can worship as they see fit.  Sounds about right, don’t you think?

But by Trump’s, Sessions’ and the evangelical’s definition, it changes to connote freedoms and privileges granted mostly to Christians — specifically, the white conservative Christians who form a vital part of the Republican base. Instead of inclusive pluralism, it now stands for exclusive primacy of the Christian faith.  Politicized religion.

In 2016, as he stumped along the campaign trail, Trump met with a large group of nearly 1,000 evangelicals, and here is what he said …

“This is such an important election. And I say to you folks because you have such power, such influence. Unfortunately, the government has weeded it away from you pretty strongly. But you’re going to get it back.”

I have two questions:

  • Why should any religious group have ‘power and influence’ in a secular government? Or society?
  • What the Sam Heck did the government “weed” away from the evangelicals?

bullshit

In the same meeting, he also promised them that they would be allowed to say “Merry Christmas” again. Excuse me, but nobody ever said they couldn’t!!!  Some businesses asked their employees to use “Happy Holidays” instead, as a courtesy to those of us who are not Christians, but are Jews, Muslims, Hindus or atheists, but nobody stopped anybody from saying “Merry Christmas”!

Then, to add insult to injury, Trump promised them that if they voted him into office, he would abandon the Johnson Amendment that forbids tax-exempt organizations from campaigning for a political candidate.  It doesn’t say that members of a church cannot campaign for a candidate as individuals, only that the church itself cannot endorse a specific candidate if they wish to maintain their tax-exempt status.  It is intended to keep religion out of politics – remember the concept of ‘separation of church and state’?

And that is precisely what he did with the religious liberty executive order he signed in May, bypassing Congress altogether … again.  Not that it would have mattered, for when he says “Jump!”, the boot-lickers in Congress ask “How high?”  And when he signed the bloody order, he commented, “We are giving our churches their voices back.”  They. Never. Lost. Their. Voices.

Only about 70% of the American public profess to be Christian.  What about the other 30% of us?  Religious liberty as defined by this administration and its supporters is liberty only for white Christians. In a recent Supreme Court decision, the Court granted Christian business owners the right to refuse service to LGBT people. The next logical step is that Christian business owners will be granted the right to refuse service to a Jew, or a Muslim, or a non-believer.  Perhaps business owners will be allowed to refuse service to African-Americans … or Latinos.

Envision a nation where your drivers’ license has a section for religion. For gender orientation.  Remember Trump’s comment a week or so ago about having to have a photo ID to buy groceries?  Maybe he was projecting into the future he envisions where an ID distinguishing religion, ethnicity, gender identification, and length of toenails are revealed.  Or perhaps … or perhaps all non-Christians will just wear a yellow star and have a number tattooed on their forearm like the one my Uncle Leon had.

Far-fetched?  Maybe, but … seemingly innocuous phrases like “religious liberty” and “family values” have become buzzwords for discrimination against any whose ideas or lifestyles differ from the Christian community.  It has become harsh and discriminatory.  ‘Values’ and ‘Liberty’ have somehow become something very ugly.

When Sessions announced his ‘task force’, he had a little celebratory ceremony … yes, by all means, let’s celebrate widespread discrimination!  He made a comment that was neither true nor sensible, referring to “nuns ordered to buy contraception” under President Obama.  To set the record straight, no nun in the history of the U.S. has ever been forced to buy contraceptives under any president!  And guess who was the guest speaker at Sessions’ little celebration?  None other than the bigoted Jack Phillips, the baker in Nevada who was so offended at being asked to place a topper with two men atop a wedding cake that he went all the way to the Supreme Court and forever changed the face of the nation.

I recently read an OpEd that said the founding fathers would not recognize the definition of ‘religious liberty’ in this, the 21st century.  To be honest, I don’t recognize it myself.  We have taken “white Christian privilege” too far, and this nation is headed down a very dangerous path.  It is one you can find in the history books if you go back to the early 1930s in Europe.

57 thoughts on “Re-defining “Liberty”

  1. You are currently reaping the benefits of a nation that was founded on the Judeo – Christian ethic. The majority of our founding fathers (not all) were believers in Jesus Christ. There is an attack in America on that christian foundation everyday. I see it very clearly and I am not a white evangelical as you stated. My question is why are you so angry?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Angry? Who said I’m angry? I’m not in the least bit angry, however I will fight against the commingling of ANY religion and government. Policy ought not be set based on religious preferences, and this nation does give those of us who are not Christians the right to our own beliefs, or to not believe at all. To turn this nation into a theocracy would be to disregard all who do not fit into a specific mold. It is no better than being racist, homophobic, Islamaphobic, misogynist, or any of the other bigoted “-isms”. I’m not angry, but I will fight against religion determining government policy or being shoved down the throats of those of us who eschew it.

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        • I believe in what I can see with my own eyes. I am a pragmatist who doesn’t buy into the “immaculate conception” thing, nor to any of the other stories about parting seas, walking on water, or healing lepers. Religious tomes, whether the bible, quran, torah or other were written by humans … need I say more? I believe in treating everybody fairly. I believe in truth, honesty, compassion, education, and taking care of those who cannot take care of themselves. I believe in helping people. I believe that nature is comprised of ecosystems that were doing just fine until humans came to exist, and we have been chipping away at the environment ever since. I also believe that humans are bringing about their own extinction, sooner than later, by ignoring the environment in favour of the pursuit of wealth. Surprised?

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  2. I am not a religious person, but some of the tenants concerning fellowship and taking care of the less fortunate and not judging, I applaud. But, I see the evangelicals and other far right Christian groups as very destructive, hateful and dangerous.
    But what really gets me is the lack of a voice and speaking up against all this by the more liberal or moderate Christian religions. They seem too quiet about all this and I have wondered if they are afraid of losing members who might share some of these more hurtful views. I have heard church attendance in moderate churches is on the decline, but the far right varieties are gaining. It seems today lots of people are more attracted to the more bullying judging fire and brimstone preachers.

    Liked by 2 people

    • But what really gets me is the lack of a voice and speaking up against all this by the more liberal or moderate Christian religions.

      They are out there, speaking up against what we see happening. But they don’t get much press coverage. I see almost daily posts from Fred Clark (the “slacktivist” blog), and from John Pavlovitz. Others are also speaking up.

      Liked by 3 people

    • See, though … taking care of others, helping the poor, not being judgmental … those really have nothing to do with religion, but only humanitarian values. I know a number of atheists and agnostics who have the highest standards for helping others, and in fact donate not only financial resources, but their time, serving in homeless shelters and soup kitchens.

      You are right … it does seem that people are more into the more radical, extreme varieties of Christianity, and I don’t know why that is. It doesn’t seem to be enough for them to simply live and let live, but they feel a need to control us all. I don’t like it … don’t like it one bit. Sigh.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Looking back at the early history of the US, it was not really marked by religious freedom either … I mean, the Puritan settlers fled from the dominance of the Anglican church in England, but once settled down (sorry for the pun) they pretty much dominanted themselves. 😉
    But of course we would think we are so much more enlightened now. Are we? 😉
    (Back from holiday, settling in – sorry, I seem not to be able to avoid that word today!!! – trying to sort out washing, general untidiness in the house and a rather dry garden. Hugs!!)

    Liked by 2 people

    • No, my friend, I think we are no more enlightened today than we were 300 years ago. And certainly no wiser than Europe in the 1920s-1930s. The lessons of history seem to have slipped our mind. The current idiot-in-chief seems to think he is the ‘boss of the world’ and perhaps seeks world domination. Especially since he is so bloody smart that he thinks California is pumping its water into the Pacific instead of using it to fight fires!!!

      I thought you must be back from your holiday! When do the boys go back to school? The kids here go back tomorrow. It will be quieter, but I worry, for I am almost certain there will be another school shooting before long, plus several of the local schools now have untrained armed people within the schools. What could possibly go wrong, eh? So, did you have a wonderful and relaxing holiday? Get any writing done? Glad you’re back, for I’ve missed you! Hugs!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi 🙂 We still have two more weeks of holiday (including this one), but then we only started middle of July (6 weeks of summer break in the Netherlands, same in Germany, versus 9 weeks in Austria). So we still have some time before the relentless alarm clock starts torturing us again. (Poor Hubby is already working though … but I blissfully ignore his alarm clock for the time being.) – Holiday was good! Lots of working in the garden 🙂 swimming in the lake, enjoying my hammock. Little bit of writing (as usual, I left the computer switched off until evening), lots of chatting with my mum, visiting family etc. It was a hot and sunny summer in Europe – but luckily at my mum’s place there is lots of shade from trees available, and the evening usually brings a cool breeze from the forest. So life was good 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Dear Jill,

    I like to call these White Evangelicals the Prosperity bible preachers. If you listen to their sermons, a good portion is about paying tithes at about 10% of a members pay check.

    I have a real problem with this as some poor folks within a church community can barely pay their bills. Frankly, the church should be helping them. If I was a millionaire with a church which was truly helping the downtrodden, the widow, the invalid, etc., I’d donate more than this 10%. There have at least 2 of these guys who have asked their members for money to pay for a new plane. They are like a cult in many cases.

    The last thing we need is to have these supposed Christians trying to impose their will on the rest of us.
    Those Evangelicals comprise about 35% of the president’s base of voters and they reliable voters. This is why the president will do just about anything to please and make them happy.

    Hugs, Gronda

    Liked by 4 people

    • You are so right. The televangelists are a nasty breed, rather a reverse Robin Hood, taking money from the poor, those who can barely keep a roof over their heads and food on the table, and using it for private jets, luxurious homes and cars, and an all-around hedonistic lifestyle. And one of them … I disremember which, was interviewed a couple of years ago and said that he justified this because “God wants me to have nice things”. Say WHAT??? Just a few days ago, Falwell tweeted something to the effect that people who criticize Trump should be put in jail. Hmph!
      Hugs!!!

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Jill, well said along with great comments. This was part of the reason for my recent post on “Do you have standing?” The key litmus test to the slippery slope religious liberty is to reverse the application. How would a remarrying divorced Evangelical feel if a Catholic baker denied making a wedding cake because he thought divorce was a sin? How about a Muslim baker doing the same for an interracial or interfaith couple? Or, what about a gay baked refusing to serve ab Evangelical couple for their stance on gays.

    The bible and other religious texts can be weaponized to exclude people. When religions exclude, they are at their absolute worst. When they include, they are at their finest. What Trump and Sessions are doing is use religions to exclude.

    Keith

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hah! I had been pondering this one for a while, but wasn’t sure how I could write it and yet remain respectful. It was actually your post that gave me the boot in the rear I needed to get it written!

      There are so many ways people can find to discriminate against others. My sometimes follower Kertsen, from the UK, has appropriately dubbed it ‘tribalism’, and it makes sense if you think about it, but I find that I belong to no tribe. There are no traits, either physical or otherwise that I embrace over others. I just really don’t care what colour a person’s skin, whether they are Catholic, Jew, Muslim or Protestant, whether they love a man or a woman. I care only who they are … how they view the world and how they treat others. To quote our mutual friend Roger: respect, compassion, tolerance … nothing else matters.

      It is a sad state that the president, attorney general and others who we expect to be above the fray lower themselves to choosing one group over the other, when they are sworn to protect us all. Humans think they are superior to the animal kingdom? Guess again.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Jill, one of my favorite lines comes from Gandhi. “I love Jesus, it is just Christians I worry about.” As a Christian, I like the comment made by former President Jimmy Carter who knows the bible as well as anyone. If you take things out of context, one can draw out language that excludes. He said in his book “A Call to Action,” about treating women better around the world and in the US., when narrowminded people use the bible to say a woman’s place is in the home or to be subservient to a man, he takes issue with that. He correctly notes that women had a huge role in keeping Christianity alive in secret as the Romans were doing their best to squelch it after Jesus and his disciples died. We must remember the gospels were not written until 30 to 70 years after Jesus died, so they are retelling the folklore. Keith

        Liked by 2 people

        • I love the Gandhi quote! So apt. Did you hear that the baker, Jack Phillips, is now suing the governor of Colorado and state civil rights officials? He declined to bake a birthday cake for a trans person who wanted it pink inside and blue outside, saying he couldn’t bake a cake commemorating gender transition! Hasn’t he caused enough chaos? Can’t he just pack up his toys and go home, bake his cakes and shut up? Good grief. Sigh.

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  6. The Trump administration is re-defining everything and not for the better…at least not for most of us. “The wall of separation between church and state” that Thomas Jefferson wrote about is being dismantled, to the detriment of many believers and nonbelievers. Our right to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness may not be as inalienable as we have believed them to be and that is frightening. Thank-you!

    Liked by 2 people

    • You are right in everything you say. I can only hope that soon we have more informed and intelligent heads in Washington –people who understand the concept of ‘separation of church and state’, and people who have at the very least READ the Constitution, which Trump, by his own admission, has not done. Even though he swore an oath to protect and defend it. SIGH!!! May I scream now?

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Jill-As a Christian myself, I am quite familiar with the whole “we are persecuted” line that we hear from Trump and others. There is a bit of a persecution complex that seems to be in big parts of American Christianity. But the reality is that we are not persecuted. We don’t have candidates practically disqualified from office because of our religion, for a start.

    Liked by 3 people

    • You are wise and have much common sense, as I think most Christians do. Sadly, the small group of radicals who believe their way is the only way, gives Christians a bad name. I so hate the divisiveness that is prevalent in this nation today. Now, when we most need to stick together, to help each other, instead we are hating. Hugs Brendan!

      Liked by 2 people

      • The sad thing is that I’m not sure it’s a small amount of Christians as you said. An overwhelming percentage of Evangelicals voted for Trump and continue to support him. Catholics (which is what I am) were somewhere in the middle. There are some groups that care about issues like immigrant rights or racial justice or LGBTQ+ but there aren’t enough of those churches in my opinion.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Yes … sigh … I know you are right … I was either a) trying to be kind, or b) trying to convince myself that it is a small percentage. Catholics (and I figured you were, by your name … Irish?) tend to lean toward the left, as the church has a history of humanitarianism, albeit perhaps not in Ireland! And, the Kennedy family made democrats out of most Catholics, I think. But as for Protestants … I see very few who believe it is their responsibility to help those less fortunate. This wasn’t necessarily the case 30-40 years ago, but today it seems to be a world where most are questioning why their lives aren’t perfect, and saying “I’ve got mine, let the other guy get his”. Sigh.

          Liked by 2 people

          • I actually became Catholic when I was in 6th grade. Before then my family went to Protestant churches.

            Catholics are a mixed bag. There are a lot of Catholics who only worry about abortion and that group of Catholics tends to vote Republican. Then there are Catholics who are more focused on immigration, racial justice, safety nets for the poor, etc who tend to vote for the Democrats. Then there are others who fall somewhere in between.

            As for Protestants, it depends on the group. African American Protestants have tended to overwhelmingly vote Democrat since LBJ. White evangelicals have tended to overwhelmingly vote Republican since…well…LBJ. But with Episcopals, Lutherans, and Presbyterians, you get a mixed bag like with Catholics.

            Liked by 3 people

            • You are much more well-versed on this than I am! Until recently, when Trump invited the extremely loud voices of the evangelicals into his policy-making, I didn’t think much about the connections between religion and politics, but today it’s impossible to ignore the connection. I do not like the direction it’s headed, either, for it seems that there is a push to do away with the concept of separation of church and state. That, I think, would be a serious mistake, and would disenfranchise a large portion of this country, myself included.

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  8. Or if you are a recovering Fundamentalist your childhood memories include phrases like ‘mark of the beast’ which in the last days would have to be shown to do anything, including buy groceries. Stay tuned….

    Liked by 3 people

      • Most all of my ‘religious ‘ background was. Once you reach puberty Gos changes from loving the little children into an angry vengeful God waiting for you to mess up and send you to hell for it. The worst kind of bait and switch, the problem as I have come to understand it, from. My own perspective, is that religions were created by men for the purpose of making sense of what they couldn’t control. The diasters of their world, the behaviors of fellow humans. Greed. Power. Like your other reader, I believe in an ultimate original source and a higher power but not that such a force is using us like chess pawns. I have four sons and swore not to raise them in such an environment. They all turned out to be loving, caring humans. They have each sought and found their own belief (or not) systems. And none voted for he who shall not be named. 😏

        Liked by 3 people

        • I was raised half-Catholic and half-Jewish, neither of which promoted the angry, vengeful God that some protestant religions do. I ascribe largely to Karl Marx’ idea, that religion is ‘the opiate of the masses’. It keeps people believing that if they just follow the rules, there will be a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, or heaven at the end of life. Ever since I was about 5, though, I have questioned it all and also decided that heaven didn’t sound like a place I wanted to go … I always had visions of just sitting around on a cloud all day, feet dangling off the edge, bored to tears … no books, no music … how dull. 😀 Religion was indeed created by men for less than altruistic purposes, and all the ‘holy’ books, the Bible, Quran, Torah … were written by men. People forget that. Sigh … it seems to me that religion actually creates more problems than it solves! Good job on your sons! I am the same with my daughter, who has also turned out to be a wonderful, caring, compassionate and intelligent young woman.

          Liked by 4 people

        • I raised my daughters in that environment but always put things in perceptive- sometime men (and women) create God in their image. Both my daughters miss the fellowship of that type community but they stay away rather than having to deal with extremes. As for the beast, I’ve already seen articles about some company putting chips on inside if wrist instead of issuing coded ID badges. I want to say it was somewhere in the Midwest. I’ll have you know that Pence is the reason that stops me from beating the impeachment drum for DJT

          Liked by 3 people

  9. Hi Jill – Thanks for another great article. As a recovering evangelical these policies make me sick to my stomach. I have said many times that the difference between our religious extremists and Muslim religious extremist – only the names have changed. Right now we have a weak grasp on the values that keep them at bay. I’m also convinced that the issue around protecting the Second Amendment may well turn out to be a “holy war” right here in our country. Several months ago I wrote a piece about separation of church and state. Actually, I was prompted by one of your posts as well. It was the first one of yours that I saw when I first started writing. I’ve attached a link here. Full Disclosure – it is heavy on the personal faith vs religion theme. rosalind.life/2018/03/29/give-to-caesar/

    Liked by 4 people

    • I love the way you say ‘recovering Evangelical’! I’ve never heard it put quite that way before, but I love it! And you are right … an extremist is an extremist, no matter what religion or political affiliation. Rather like that old Pogo saying: We have met the enemy, and he is us.” I fully agree with you on the 2nd Amendment … it is already a very divisive issue, and with school starting back, I would almost bet there will be a new school shooting between now and November mid-terms. Sooner or later, it is going to come to a head … I was surprised it didn’t, more so than it did, after Parkland.

      I just read your post and I have to say … that was awe-inspiring. I was raised Jewish-Catholic, and now consider myself pretty much an agnostic, for I have asked far too many questions to which there were no answers, and have seen far too much prejudice on the part of ALL religions. Your post, though, was very moving and I’m thrilled to have played a small part in the motivation for it. Thank you for sharing that …

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks Jill. I currently go with the “I’m spiritual, but not religious”. I’ve had some pretty awesome experiences that make difficult for me to deny a higher power. Coming from a fundamentalist background, I learned a lot in the Catholic church about separating superstitions and traditions from a faith practice. I was lucky. I don’t believe that happens often in churches. As always thank for all the effort you put into keeping us on task to stay alert. Early voting for primaries starts this Saturday in Florida and folks are working hard to turn the state. Fingers crossed.😉

        Liked by 3 people

        • Yes, I definitely have my fingers crossed for Florida — and for the nation! We need to restore the ‘checks and balances’ that keep us from becoming a dictatorship, and we’re coming too close for comfort, in my opinion! Thank you for your vote of confidence! It means a lot and keeps me motivated!

          Liked by 2 people

  10. About the only thing I would disagree on is this…. is liberty only for white Christians….. as I think it should read ‘some’ white Christians as there will be many not part of the evangelical tribe who were happy with the status quo and whose churches sent people out to support MLK and further back maybe on the freedom railroad. Not all Christians are into the self indulgence of thinking themselves better than others. Evangelicals certainly do though and feel their rules are the ones which people should live by and they will be very hard on those that don’t and have people on every street to report on those that don’t. Trump already had a lot to answer for and now even more. The next President is going to have so much clearing up to do. Before that either Trump has to be found guilty of collusion and locked up or the Democrats must make sure of votes for their candidates in November and have Congress hold Trump/Sessions in check.
    Cwtch

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hello David, I agree. Sadly it will take a generation to undo the stink tRump and crew have created. It will take a lot of time to quench the fire of hatred they have let blossom and flower. There are so many life time appointments to judgeship positions that they are filling with the most ardent ideologues. The environment will also not recover soon as the lands sold / given over to development / mineral / oil & Gas removals will never be able to be undone. The waters and air degradation will also take time and technology to fix. tRump has been a disaster for our country and the world as well. Hugs

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  11. Bravo Jill, grand post. I find it interesting that people like Jack Phillips pick and choose what laws in the bible they want to make an issue of. For example in the Jack Phillips case he claimed if he made a cake for a same sex wedding using his artistic talent would be supporting the idea of same sex marriage. This despite refusing to sell any cake including a cake all ready made. However he surely has made cakes for people in second or third marriages, and people who eat shellfish, and also where clothes of different fabrics. So I found it funny how outraged the conservatives were on the not serving of Sarah Sanders yet they are totally OK with not serving gays and non-whites. I have seen a few places already putting up signs that say ” no gays allowed” and several republican politicians have supported the right of a store / business owner to refuse service to anyone they wish, specifically black people. What has happened is they have gutted the civil rights laws , and voided any nondiscrimination laws. One last point, the argument SCOTUS used in the weeding cake case to over turn the lower courts decision and send it back to the lower court was “a perception of hostility toward religion” claiming that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission had animosity to religious faith. Which was not true. However the SCOTUS then threw that whole argument out in favor of the tRump Muslim travel ban, which was a ban based solely on hostility / animosity toward the religion of Islam. But now we know why, Kennedy was in negotiation with tRump to get his former law clerk Brett Kavanaugh as his replacement on the court. He did not want to anger the tRump and so he gave the rulings the conservatives would like. Hugs

    Liked by 9 people

    • Thanks Scottie! This has been weighing on my mind for quite a while, and Sessions and his task force was the straw that broke the camel’s back. I try very hard not to offend, but there comes a point that if people want to act like jerks, then I will call them jerks (I actually had another word in mind, but …). I fear we are heading backward to the days of segregated restaurants, bathrooms and drinking fountains, not to mention discrimination in employment and housing. It is simply unacceptable, and yet if we do not get rid of the ‘fools on the hill’, I don’t know what will stop it.
      Hugs!!!

      Liked by 4 people

      • Since you post songs….

        Fool on the Hill…..Paul McCarthy

        Day after day, alone on a hill
        The man with the foolish grin is sitting perfectly still
        Nobody wants to know him
        They can see that he’s just a fool
        But he never gives an answer
        But the fool on the hill
        Sees the sun going down
        And the eyes in his head
        See the world spinning round
        His head in a cloud
        The man with a foolish grin is talking perfectly loud
        But nobody wants to hear him
        They can see that he’s just a fool
        But he never gives an answer

        Liked by 2 people

      • I fully agree … SCOTUS is intended to be apolitical, but that is difficult in this day of hearty politicization. RBG is a hero in my book, for hanging in for the good of the country, when I imagine she would very much like to retire.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. As a man who follows the teachings of Jesus (please note that I do not call myself Christian) I am horrified that this government has taken it upon itself to judge morality and immorality, or define whose God is protected by legislation and whose is not. Jill, this is Evangelical hogwash in the kindest perspective and pure bullshit at its worst.

    Liked by 6 people

    • I respect and admire those who take literally the teachings of Christ and try to live their lives by those principles. The evangelicals are a whole ‘nother ball of wax, however, and it is they who have the ear of the president and others in government. Like you, I am horrified by these turns of events. Trump is failing to honour his oath to ‘uphold the Constitution’ … the Constitution that calls for a distinct separation of church and state. I fear the path we are on.

      Liked by 6 people

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