♫ I Want To Hold Your Hand ♫

It was 55 years ago today that a young British rock group made their U.S. debut on the Ed Sullivan Show.  The name of the group, of course, was The Beatles.

From History.com …

Although it was difficult to hear the performance over the screams of teenage girls in the studio audience, an estimated 73 million U.S. television viewers, or about 40 percent of the U.S. population, tuned in to watch. Sullivan immediately booked the Beatles for two more appearances that month.

The group made their first public concert appearance in the United States on February 11 at the Coliseum in Washington, D.C., and 20,000 fans attended. The next day, they gave two back-to-back performances at New York’s Carnegie Hall, and police were forced to close off the streets around the venerable music hall because of fan hysteria. On February 22, the Beatles returned to England.

Now, I must confess to being a bit strange when I was young … shut up Joe, don’t even say it … and I was not all that impressed with The Beatles that first time I saw them on Ed Sullivan.  Nor was I impressed by the girls ripping off their clothes, screaming and fainting.  Eventually I came to appreciate The Beatles and their music, but unlike some others, it was definitely not love at first sight.

I am including two clips tonight.  The first is a clip from the November 18, 1963 edition of the Huntley-Brinkley Report by Edwin Newman.  The video no longer exists, but this audio-only copy was discovered in 2013, and I think you’ll enjoy it … I did!  The second is a video of one of the songs they performed on 09 February 1964.

I Want to Hold Your Hand
The Beatles

Oh yeah I tell you somethin’
I think you’ll understand
When I say that somethin’
I want to hold your hand
I want to hold your hand
I want to hold your hand

Oh please say to me
You’ll let me be your man
And please say to me
You’ll let me hold your hand
Now, let me hold your hand
I want to hold your hand

And when I touch you
I feel happy inside
It’s such a feelin’ that my love
I can’t hide
I can’t hide
I can’t hide

Yeah, you got that somethin’
I think you’ll understand
When I say that somethin’
I want to hold your hand
I want to hold your hand
I want to hold your hand

And when I touch you
I feel happy inside
It’s such a feelin’ that my love
I can’t hide
I can’t hide
I can’t hide

Yeah, you got that somethin’
I think you’ll understand
When I feel that somethin’
I want to hold your hand
I want to hold your hand
I want to hold your hand
I want to hold your hand

Songwriters: John Lennon / Paul Mccartney
I Want to Hold Your Hand lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

21 thoughts on “♫ I Want To Hold Your Hand ♫

  1. I remember well the famous Beatles appearance on Ed Sullivan in 1964. My boyfriend and I had been out earlier and came back to my home to find my family sitting in front of the TV waiting for the performance. My eldest sister was in college at the time and never quite embraced the Beatles like we younger two sisters. My sweet boyfriend was a bit confounded by my devotion to Paul and said as much to my Father about hoping that this would soon pass. “Son”, my Father said as he shook his head, “I said the same thing back in 1956 when Elvis was making his Sullivan appearance, but I learned to never underestimate what makes a teenage girl’s heart throb.” Thank-you!

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  2. 14 years old, growing up on a steady diet of Elvis Presley and then Ricky Nelson, the Beatles were exciting. Motown wss just coming into its own. It was the best of times, it was greatest of times to be growing up. The love music was sweet, but it was the socially-conscious music that appealed most to me. From rock to psychedelia the progress of music ws astounded, all led by tne Beatles and the bands they inspired. I am biased, obviously, but from 1963 to 1970 was the best time for music in my lifetime. It climaxed with Let It Be, and ended with Imagine. Nobody writes like that today.

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    • I didn’t start actually liking The Beatles until sometime later … can’t even remember when, exactly. Like you, I was heavily into the protest songs of the 60s, the social conscience genre, and a big Motown fan. And you already know i agree with you on Imagine … I would play that one once every week if I thought people wouldn’t get bored with it.

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  3. I remember watching their little cartoons on TV in Australia, with the lyrics underneath with a ball bouncing over the words. “Yellow Submarine” was my favorite then, because what 8-year-old doesn’t want to live in a yellow submarine? My husband and I got to see Paul McCartney at the Austin City Limits Music Festival last autumn, and boy, he still rocks! What energy! By the way, have you seen the car karaoke with him? That was the best.

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    • I don’t think I ever saw the cartoons with the bouncing ball! Sounds like fun! YES, a reader recommended the car karaoke about a year ago and you’re right … it is much fun! I’m still a fan of McCartney … in fact, probably more so now than in his earlier years. His duet with Stevie Wonder, Ebony & Ivory, is forever #1 on my playlist.

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  4. I think the appeal of those early songs were to the very young teenage girl. Keith has it right that a lot of the later songs, the later albums were more profound and much better musically.Hey Jude, Eleonor Rigby, She’s leaving Home and Let it Be amongst others..By the time those came along I could tolerate them.
    Cwtch

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    • Agreed … I wasn’t ever crazy over their earlier music, but appreciated and even liked much of their later music. As I told Keith, I think I was the only 13-year-old girl in the U.S. who wasn’t swooning over them in 1964.
      Cwtch

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  5. Jill, it is interesting that the songs that launched them were very simplistic lyrics with a catchy tune. Their musicality, subject matter and word smithing advanced greatly with succeeding albums. Songs like “Eleanor Rigby,” “Lady Madonna,” “Instant Karma,” “Get Back,” “Yesterday” et al were far more profound. I think when they worked with George Martin, they were ahead of their time. Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys was so inspired by “Sergeant Pepper,” he wrote the songs that comprised “Pet Sounds.”

    Keith

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    • Yes, perhaps that’s why I wasn’t a fan at all of their earlier music (I think I was the only 13-year-old girl who didn’t swoon over them), but came to appreciate and enjoy their later music. I also think that much of their earlier appeal had a lot to do with the way they meshed, bonded … they had an almost palpable camaraderie.

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      • Jill, I think you are right about the camaraderie. I think it was the time spent in Hamburg playing seven shows a day six days a week. They became better musicians as they had to play new material with so many shows. Malcolm Gladwell opens his book “Outliers” about this Hamburg experience creating the 10,000 hours of practice to perfect a craft. Keith

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