The Mountain

A few days ago, I came upon a poem.  Typically, I pass right on by most poetry, for unless it’s very short, like a limerick, I rarely understand it.  In college, poetry thoroughly defeated me, even the simplest of them.  But, for some reason this one caught my eye and I read it … once, then again. And I thought, “BINGO!”  This is how I sometimes feel, as if I simply can’t do what needs to be done.  However, being a stubborn wench I typically give myself a good ‘talking to’ and get on with the business at hand.  But this poem struck a chord, and its message is, I think, beautifully and yet simply conveyed.  The poem, titled The Mountain, is by Laura Ding-Edwards of Herefordshire in the United Kingdom.  Since I enjoyed it, I thought perhaps you might also …

The Mountain

The Mountain

41 thoughts on “The Mountain

  1. Wow! I just came across this – thank so so much for sharing my work and your lovely comments about it! I’m so glad it resonated with you. If any of you are on Facebook you can follow my page if you search Rainbird Roots, i’d love you to join me! X

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank YOU for your beautiful poetry! I and my readers all loved it, and I now have it on my fridge to read every morning! I just followed you on Facebook. Though I rarely spend more than a few minutes on Facebook, I look forward to reading more of your work. Thanks again, on behalf of myself and my readers!

      Like

  2. Dear Jill,

    Thank you for sharing this poem. I needed it and it did pick me up. I’ll be reading it daily as a form of antibiotic to protect me from all the ugly stuff that are bombarding all of us on a daily basis.

    Hugs, Gronda

    Liked by 1 person

    • I used to hike on occasion with my friend Herb, and he always said it is “all mental”. All about attitude. And I believe it, for some mornings if I get up and tell myself how tired I am, or how poorly I feel, I seem to just drag. But, once I say to myself, “get over it … you’d feel fine if you just got busy”, then I forget about tiredness, aches & pains, and live life. Attitude … or, as my dad always said, “the mind is powerful … you can talk yourself into or out of anything”.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Jill, this is nice. We often see a huge obstacle and simply not try. Taking it on in small steps is a way to tackle it. I used to tell my kids when they did not know how to do a math problem, to write down what they do know. Just starting makes a world of difference. Keith

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Yes, brilliant and I do think often a rhyming poem is eaasier to read and the rythmn of this adds to the soothing effect. I don’t write or read poetry seriously, but why shouldn’t we appreciate the poems we understand straight away.

    Liked by 1 person

    • A poetry critic, who shall remain nameless as he is still around on CBC radio, once told me I am not a poet. “You’re not hiding anything,” he said. “You can’t call it poetry if the meaning is clear and available.” And I asked him, “What good is a poem if no one understands the hidden message?” He just ignored me. So I ignored him. And the publishers ignored me in their turn. Everyone has their own idea. If a poet says it is poetry, it is poetry. If a reader says it is poetry, then it is good poetry.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Your poetry critic is a snob. For me, poetry is like what some say about visual art such as painting, I know what I like or don’t like, though I cannot say why, cannot analyze the reason. Nor do I think one should be forced to analyze reasons, hidden meanings, etc. I take things pretty much at face value. It isn’t, after all, rocket science, but rather an art form.

        Like

    • Exactly! Some believe a poem must be cryptic, have hidden meanings, in order to qualify as good poetry. But, for a literalist like myself, we need to be able to garner the meaning from the words, not from what is behind those words.

      Like

I would like to hear your opinion, so please comment if you feel so inclined.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s