Ubuntu

A week or so ago, our friend David mentioned that he had discovered a new word, ‘Ubuntu’, and that it was a beautiful philosophy from Africa. Today, David writes about Ubuntu, a philosophy of humanity, and he does so far more eloquently than I could have done, so I am sharing his words with you. I have a few thoughts of my own on Ubuntu, and will put pen to paper, or fingers to keyboard in a few days. Thank you, David, for sharing with us your gracious words, as well as your own philosophy of Hugs!

The BUTHIDARS

President Barack Obama said at the funeral of Nelson Mandela :-

There is a word in South Africa – Ubuntu – a word that captures Mandela’s greatest gift: his recognition that we are all bound together in ways that are invisible to the eye; that there is a oneness to humanity; that we achieve ourselves by sharing ourselves with others, and caring for those around us.

We can never know how much of this sense was innate in him, or how much was shaped in a dark and solitary cell. But we remember the gestures, large and small – introducing his jailers as honored guests at his inauguration; taking a pitch in a Springbok uniform; turning his family’s heartbreak into a call to confront HIV/AIDS – that revealed the depth of his empathy and his understanding. He not only embodied Ubuntu, he taught millions to find that truth within themselves.

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27 thoughts on “Ubuntu

  1. This is such a lovely word, I first recognized the word Ubuntu 15 years ago, and knew it roughly meant loving-kindness, generosity and sharing.
    I had been using the LINUX operating system since 98′ as an alternative to Windows. By 04′ Ubuntu came into the scene as a free open-source Linux distribution based on Debian Project, nonprofit operating software for PC.
    As with all open-source coding, transparency and freedom to modify is the key. Any programmer can contribute to the development and improve the OS for all, elegant and egalitarian alternative solution to the corporate controlled for profit, exploitative and invasive/ info tracking/ profiling/ ad based revenue generating OS’ like Microsoft or Apple (who freely admits to colluding with the gov’t).
    Freedom for the ppl, co-operative sharing of information instead of competition for profit/ gov’t controlled media and internet! Cheers. 🙂

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    • You are the only person I know who ever heard Mandela up-close-and-personal! I can only imagine how moving an experience that must have been. If you feel so inclined, touch base with David about doing a guest post on the topic. The more conversation we all have about this, the closer it comes to becoming a reality.

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  2. Thank you for your kindness on re-blogging this for me Jill. The philosophy is wonderful and coming via Nelson Mandela has an impeccable pedigree.This seems to have a home in many African Nations from Botswana to South Africa, The Zulu have it as do the tribes of Botswana and the Bantu and the Shona. They learn co-existence so I see no reason we can’t throw off hate and try it too.
    Cwtch Mawr.

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    • Not kindness … it is my pleasure. This is a philosophy that deserves to be shared, to be spread far and wide and to be THOUGHT about, not just shoved aside. We are all so wrapped up in the day-to-day detritus, the news of the moment, that we forget the purpose of it all. We forget to be human. I mentioned to you that I would like to do a guest post on your blog on this topic, and I’m getting a few ideas, but it will take a few days, for as you know, I’m a bit overwhelmed at the moment. But this is something I want to see gain momentum … I want to help it gain momentum if I can. It is, I think, a beautiful philosophy of life, and one that could actually bring peace on earth, if only everybody would listen.
      Cwtch Mawr

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    • I have been promoting this idea for many years now, that all living beings are connected (not just humans). I discovered it when searching my own being back in the 80s, though I sensed it before that. If one looks deep enough inside themself, the knowledge is there for the finding. So too is the knowledge that responsibility is universal.

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      • If you feel so inclined, why don’t you get in touch with David about a guest post on his blog, which would also be shared on mine? To your point … yes, if one looks deeply enough inside oneself, but unfortunately most of us these days are so caught up in the superficial that we never take the time to do that anymore. A timely reminder, this is, that we need to step back from the detritus sometimes and remember to be human.

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        • I cannot finish a post if I try these days. I start writing, something interrupts me, and when I go back to it I cannot remember what I wanted to say. I cannot keep my focus more than a few minutes. For a hunt and peck typist I am fast, but keeping up with my mind is nigh impossible. And the mind runs out of steam so fast I sleep more than I am awake these days. I have a T-shirt that warns me, “IT IS OK TO GET OLDER, JUST DON’T GET OLD!” I’m losing that battle more every day. My past is catching up to my present. Pretty soon I will have no future…

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          • Now I’m concerned. Have you had a checkup for your pacemaker lately? I find focus hard to come by these days too, but I sleep less, not more. Please take care of yourself … we need you!

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            • I’m waiting for the pacemaker people to call me, but summer is always a hit and miss time. Personally I think it is old age. I’ve lived far more than 70 years this incarnation. If the mind has a limit on how much it can do in one lifetime, I have exceeded it many times over.It is time for a vacation, lol. LuL.

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              • Sigh. Selfishly, I hope you have a few more years left in you, and you aren’t that much over 70! Gail and the kitties need you, and I need you. But, I also understand how you feel. There comes a point … 😥

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                  • I am exactly the same … I refuse to live in a world where I am not able to enjoy life, to read a book, or have an intelligent conversation. Some days I think I am losing my mental acuity, but then other days it seems to be okay. I still have some things I want to accomplish, so that keeps me fit, I think.

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                    • We can have hope together, and invite all those other old fogeys you talk to into our community. But then, that is already what you are doing with your blog, n’est-ce pas?

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                    • Oui, ça l’est! And I think we have many already in our community. It’s funny, but most who follow my blog, the ones who are regular readers, seem to be in our age group. Do I simply not appeal to younger readers? I do have several in the 20s-30s age range, but the majority are over 60.

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                    • And those over 60 learned how to think mainly for themselves. Younger folk were talk how to be parts of the machinery of society. I am not saying this to lay blame, except at the feet of the society that brought them up. I am just offering my opinion as to how society overreacted after the 60s. They thought the flaw was teaching us how to think for ourselves. Instead that was our strength. Some younger folk see that. A lot don’t!

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                    • I agree with what you say, and sadly, teaching young people to think for themselves is something our education system no longer does. Ad you say, we now teach them what to think, rather than how to think for themselves. There are some who will be rebels, who will question everything, as they should. But those, I fear, are in the minority.

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                    • I think what we really need to look at are parents who allow their children to be taught to not think for themselves. It is the free thinkers of the world who advance civilization, who make the important discoveries. We don’t need anything else to make our lives easier and more comfortable, we need to challenge ourselves to become better people. our civilization reminds me of nearing the end of the Roman Empire. But that resulted in the Dark Ages. We need to end up in an Age of Light.

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    • It is thought-provoking. I get so caught up in the day-to-day detritus, as I think many of us do, that I sometimes lose sight of what I am fighting for: humanitarianism. It pays, sometimes, to step back and think about how we really want the world to be. My thoughts will probably be a few days from now, for I am behind on everything right now, even breathing!

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