Good People Doing Good Things — Lots of ‘Em

This week, the focus is on everyday people doing things that help others in one way or another.  It’s nice to report on those people who are making mega-differences in people’s lives, but sometimes it’s just as meaningful to look at the everyday folks who are doing what is within their power to make a difference.  Sometime, the opportunity to be a ‘good people’ just drops in your lap, as you’ll see in the last story.


Mohan-3Mohan Sudabattula, a 23-year-old student, along with his team of volunteers collect medical equipment from thrift stores and donations. They clean up the gear, which ranges from slings and braces to wheelchairs and walkers, and then send it to disadvantaged medical facilities around the world.Mohan-1.pngSudabattula thought of this idea when he was in school and volunteering in the prosthetics department at a nearby hospital. Whenever a patient outgrew a prosthetic, it would simply be thrown in the garbage. While prosthetics are designed exclusively for the wearer, Mohan wondered if he could recycle other medical equipment and give it a new life.Mohan-2Back in 2006, he went to India with his parents, and while at an orphanage he saw children creating makeshift crutches and wheelchairs out of everyday objects. Now, over ten years later, he was able to donate several dozen wheelchairs and crutches to that very same orphanage because of the work he is doing with Project Embrace.

Since launching the nonprofit in 2016, the group has donated over 900 refurbished medical devices to low-income hospitals in the U.S. and India.


Simon Child works in the very McDonalds in Fayetteville, Florida that he was caught sleeping in. When a woman in the community saw Child asleep in a booth, she photographed him and posted the picture on Facebook, apparently hoping to mock or shame him.Simon-1.jpegThe post had the opposite effect the woman was hoping for, as everyone in the community rallied around the homeless worker. They learned that Child had a child of his own and was working tirelessly to support them both after the death of his mother.Simon-2.jpgNews spread, and soon the entire community was pitching in to help Simon. He got a free haircut from a local barbershop to help him look more professional. A local eatery lent him a car for job interviews. One member even offered to put Child and his son up in a hotel until they found a permanent residence.Simon-3.pngMembers also donated food, clothes, diapers, and more to help the struggling father. They even raised $2,000 for Child to get a life start. As for the woman, Child says he harbors no ill will towards her because, without her post, the community would have never known.


Rita-1Riya Hariharan (16, Palo Alto, California) is the founder Giftkids.net, a global organization that provides critically needed educational and wellness supplies for kids who are orphans around the world with the goal to motivate the kids to stay in school, be well, and change the trajectory of their future.  Through her organization, Riya is helping two severely under-resourced schools, in Haiti and India.

In India, Riya supports an orphanage of children who are primarily from the historically most oppressed (Dalit) community and come from a variety of backgrounds … single mothers, parents unable to provide basic care and mostly children who are orphans. Kids need to walk a good distance to school through the somewhat harsh climates in Bidar – from cold winters to the heavy southwest monsoon. ​ Giftkids shipped colorful sweaters to them in time for the Indian holiday of Diwali.rita-india.pngIn Haiti, the remedial school she helps is comprised of enthusiastic kids who struggle with reading and are first-generation learners. They attend this free school with the hope to be able to attend high school someday. However the kids are often absent in class because they do not have proper shoes to walk the distance to school. ​In 2017, Giftkids shipped new sneakers to them in time for their pre-Kanaval celebration in January.riya-haiti.pngIn the two years since its start, Giftkids today has helped over 100 kids in need in Haiti, India, and San Jose, California.


This last story is a really small thing, but it struck a chord with me, and I think speaks volumes about this man.

Tim Crowley and some buddies were hanging out in Tim’s backyard last weekend, and there was a fair amount of drinking going on when all of a sudden, a baby bird fell out of the sky!  The bird needed help, so Tim, still with some of his wits about him, called the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah and sent them a picture of the bird.Petey-1The staff at the Center told Tim to bring the baby bird on in, but there was one problem:  nobody in the group was sober enough to drive!  So, after some thought and debate, they called for an Uber!  The first Uber driver refused, so they didn’t tell the next driver who the passenger would be, and she gladly delivered the little birdie to the Wildlife Center.Petey-2The staff at the center named the little guy, fittingly, Petey Uber, and they say it is unlikely he would have survived without intervention.  Tim Crowley … the man paid for an Uber to save the life of one little birdie!  Doesn’t that bring a lump to your throat?  How many people do you know who would have done the same?

Petey is reportedly doing fine and will be released into the wild when he is able to survive on his own.  Thanks to Tim Crowley!


And that’s a wrap for today, folks!  If any of you run across a ‘good people’, feel free to send me a link or story, and I will consider it for inclusion in the good people posts!  Meanwhile, let’s all try to be a good people, even if only in a small way.

21 thoughts on “Good People Doing Good Things — Lots of ‘Em

    • It takes caring, and compassion. We all have that. It is just that a lot of people have forgotten how to use them in this ‘me’ generation. We need (all of us) to focus on our good traits, and to push the negative ones into the background. The world could change overnight, if everyone did that. ❤️❤️❤️

      Liked by 2 people

    • As I was just saying to Colette, it seems that those who are most willing to jump in and help others, are those who have the least themselves. While there are a few notable exceptions, most people of wealth seem to tune out, to live in their ivory tower mansions and not see the needs of people. Rather makes me glad I’m not wealthy. There is a lot of kindness out there, but it goes largely unnoticed, for people are more concerned with conflict and controversy, greed and bigotry. ‘Tis an imperfect world we live in, and seems to me that it is getting more so with each passing year.
      Cwtch

      Liked by 1 person

  1. All good stories. Isn’t it interesting that it is just simple everyday folk who rally around anyone or anything suffering misfortune. We don’t hear so much of that because news media always focus on the negative or the sensational.
    Wouldn’t it be great if some of these stories could make it to the major news channels. Every news program could end with someone’s story of helping others. You never know, it might inspire more people to trust and help each other more. 🤗 ❤️

    Liked by 2 people

    • You’re quite right … it seems to me that those who have the least, are most willing to help others, to give of themselves. The media is ‘for profit’, so they push the stories that sell, which happen to be the ones with blood, gore, and controversy. It’s rather a sad statement of our society that people would rather read about Trump’s screeching session, or a plane crash where hundreds died than about a man calling a taxi for an injured bird.

      Actually, all these stories have been on the new … local, not necessarily national, although one of them, and I don’t remember which, made it to People magazine. But, you aren’t going to see them in the headlines, for they just don’t interest people enough. I like your idea about ending each news broadcast with a snippet of ‘good people’. ❤

      Liked by 2 people

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