♫ Blackbird ♫ (Redux)

I really don’t know why, but this one, that I played back in September of 2018, came to my mind this evening and begged me to play it again.  And so, I am.  Tomorrow, I promise something brand new … well, not brand new, but something I’ve never played on this blog before.

Paul McCartney wrote this about the civil rights struggle for African-Americans after reading about race riots in the US. He penned it in his kitchen in Scotland not long after Little Rock Nine, when the federal courts forced the racial desegregation of the Arkansas capital’s school system.Little Rock Nine“I was sitting around with my acoustic guitar and I’d heard about the civil rights troubles that were happening in the ’60s in Alabama, Mississippi, Little Rock in particular,” he told GQ. “I just thought it would be really good if I could write something that if it ever reached any of the people going through those problems, it might give them a little bit of hope. So, I wrote ‘Blackbird.'”

McCartney-meets-little-rock-nine-2

McCartney with two of the Little Rock Nine

Blackbird
Paul McCartney

Blackbird singing in the dead of night, take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life, you were only waiting for this moment to arise

Blackbird singing in the dead of night, take these sunken eyes and learn to see
All your life, you were only waiting for this moment to be free

Black-bird fly
Black-bird fly, into the light of a dark black night

Black-bird fly
Black-bird fly, into the light of a dark black night

Blackbird singing in the dead of night, take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life, you were only waiting for this moment to arise
you were only waiting for this moment to arise
you were only waiting for this moment to arise

Songwriters: John Lennon / Paul McCartney
Blackbird lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

 

18 thoughts on “♫ Blackbird ♫ (Redux)

  1. I’ve always liked this melodic little tune, gorgeous fingerpicking technique and even better backstory!
    Originally I assumed the lyrics were an allegory for picking urself back up when life beats u down. Paul fighting in solidarity for civil rights make perfect sense. Very nice. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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