♫ A World Without Love ♫ (Redux)

A few nights ago, I played a song by Chad & Jeremy, “Yesterday’s Gone”.  A couple of comments mentioned another duo, famous around the same time, Peter & Gordon.  Which made me think of their #1 hit song in both the U.S. and UK, “A World Without Love”.  But alas, I played this one in 2019 and had forgotten!  Well, tonight I’m playing it again … it’s the eve of New Year’s Eve, I must get up early to finish my grocery shopping, and I have much to do tomorrow, so I’m taking the easy way out, and hoping you’ll enjoy it anyway!


I’m taking you way back tonight … 1964.  I was thirteen years old and had just gotten my first full-time job … making $100 per week!  I thought I was rolling in dough!  That was also the year I became a serious smoker, learned to drive a stick shift, and learned to kiss with my eyes closed!  It was, obviously, a memorable year.  Among the memories from that year is this song by British duo Peter and Gordon.

I did not know that John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote this song. It is the biggest hit they wrote that was not released by The Beatles. It became the first and biggest hit for Peter & Gordon.  The song was originally meant to be recorded by The Beatles, but that plan was vetoed by John Lennon. Peter Asher explained: “John thought the first line ‘Please lock me away’ was laughable.”

Peter Asher and Gordon Waller, then (1965) and 40 years later (2005)

Peter & Gordon were Peter Asher and Gordon Waller. Paul McCartney went out with Asher’s sister, the actress Jane Asher, which is how he met Peter. This song found its way to Peter Asher when Paul McCartney was living in the Asher household at 57 Wimpole Street in London during his time dating Jane Asher. He played the song for Peter while in his bedroom.  According to Asher …

“Paul had played Gordon and me that song at some point, just in passing. It was really just half a song. It didn’t yet have a bridge. Gordon and I were working at clubs in London at that time, and we got offered a record deal by EMI, who saw us as an English version of The Kingston Trio, or a Peter, Paul and Mary type of thing. We did the American folk song ‘500 Miles,’ and that was the song they were thinking would be our first single. Anyway, we signed the record deal with EMI, and set the date for our first recording session. At that point I went to Paul and asked him if that orphaned song was still up for grabs, since we needed three or four songs to record on that first day in the studio. Paul said we could have it, so I asked him to finish the bridge. And he did. As I recall, the bridge came in the nick of time for us to record; World Without Love’ at that first session.”

An interesting side note:  Peter Asher would go on to become the manager of James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt.  Asher is still alive and active in the music business today, but Gordon Waller died in 2009.

A World Without Love
Peter and Gordon

Please lock me away
And don’t allow the day
Here inside where I hide
With my loneliness

I don’t care what they say I won’t stay
In a world without love

Birds sing out of tune
And rain clouds hide the moon
I’m OK, here I’ll stay
With my loneliness

I don’t care what they say I won’t stay
In a world without love

So I wait and in a while
I will see my true love’s smile
She may come, I know not when
When she does I lose
So baby until then

Lock me away
And don’t allow the day
Here inside where I hide
With my loneliness

I don’t care what they say I won’t stay
In a world without love

So I wait and in a while
I will see my true love’s smile
She may come, I know not when
When she does I lose
So baby until then

Lock me away
And don’t allow the day
Here inside where I hide
With my loneliness

I don’t care what they say I won’t stay
In a world without love

I don’t care what they say I won’t stay
In a world without love

Songwriters: John Lennon / Paul Mccartney
A World Without Love lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

23 thoughts on “♫ A World Without Love ♫ (Redux)

  1. Although credited to Lennon/McCartney as all their songs were, that is very clearly one of Paul’s, as John’s comment shows! Incidentally, the ‘Crackerjack’ from which that clip comes was a children’s tv programme, hugely popular at the time. We all had to be home from school in time for the opening ‘It’s Friday, it’s five to five, iiit’s CRACKERJACK!’

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    • Thanks for the info about ‘Crackerjack’ … I hadn’t even noticed that! Your comment started me thinking back, and trying to remember some kids t.v. show that was hugely popular here back in the 50s, but apart from Captain Kangaroo and cartoons, I cannot think of one. My favourite was always the Three Stooges … could explain some things, yes?

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      • I’ve seen very little of them but I think I prefer the Marx Brothers, which probably explains a lot about me! Crackerjack wasn’t really comparable to either, though: it was a variety show for kids, with jokes, sketches, magicians and the like. And one pop act each week – we were in heaven!

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        • Ah, nowadays I would agree with you, but my very young self found humour in the slapstick comedy of the Stooges. I think the closest we can come to Crackerjack is Sesame Street, which was after my youth, but I often watched it with my children and later my granddaughter, and came to love it. Did you guys get Sesame Street over there?

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          • Sesame Street caused controversy here. The BBC refused it, saying we did educational tv much better (!) and the various ITV regions eventually took it up, but never all at the same time. It was never on when my two were growing up, but we had loads of good children’s tv here anyway, so it wasn’t missed! I expect it’s still on some cable channels here, though.

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  2. Oh yes, a part of my life too! Very evocative. Chad and Jeremy reminded me very much of the Seekers. Do you know them? They were an Australian group that made it in London, but I am not sure how popular they were in the US. Very much in the Peter, Paul and May tradition. Here’s a link if you fancy

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    • The Seekers were very big in Canada, Anne, two of their hits being I’ll Never Find Another You and, of course, Georgy Girl, but I shamefully admit I thought they were British.
      And from the Seekers, one must also remember the Searchers. Lots of good music there. Ah, those were the days.

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