The Week’s Best Cartoons 3/26

Let’s start this Sunday out with the week’s best political cartoons from TokyoSand over at Political Charge, shall we?  Many topics to tackle this week … the confirmation hearings for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, the Russian war in Ukraine, fuel prices, the emails between Clarence Thomas’ wife and Mark Meadows … whew … it’s enough to wear us out, but the political cartoonists are at their best!  Thank you, TS!


Here’s some of the great cartoons I saw this week about the confirmation hearings for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, the war in Ukraine, and more.

See all the ‘toons at TokyoSand’s Political Charge!

39 thoughts on “The Week’s Best Cartoons 3/26

  1. When it comes to commentary of the antics of the US Right I’ve having a trouble distinguishing betwixt Cartoons and Editorials.
    It’s like looking in the mirror (sarcasm warning…sarcasm warning) of the Martyr’d Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters antics.

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    • No GP, I’m actually not registered with either party and I have voted for candidates in both parties before. Like you, I do not want us … or anybody … in another war. However, we cannot close our eyes and simply allow a dictator with a desire to build an empire by killing millions have his way. It’s rather like, if you see someone beating a woman on the street corner, you’re going to have to step in and try to stop it, right?

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      • Yes, indeed. It just seems to me that Biden is “egging on” that dictator. Putin at this point really needs to find a way to back down gracefully and he isn’t going to do that while ‘losing face.’ He can’t allow it to seem that Biden’s inept sanctions did the job.

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        • This is part of the long European Drama 1,500 years old. The USA linked by myriad and subtle ties to Europe keeps out of it at its own peril.
          Roosevelt 32nd President and the majority of his military staff understood this, so did the presidents and attendant staffs during the Cold War.
          Putin is the one who decided to ride the tiger.

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        • You make a good point, that Putin is not going to ‘lose face’ and he must be given a way to bow out with his ‘dignity’, such as it is, intact. I hadn’t really thought of it like that before. Still … we cannot simply sit back and do nothing. I don’t know what the answer is … I suspect nobody is quite sure at the moment.

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          • From one of the grim European perspective…..
            As long as Putin wants to stay we keep the Ukrainians supplied with sufficient weapons for air defence, anti-tank, and low level guerrilla warfare. And there’s the economic squeeze, harder.
            And then see what goes on in the more shadowy corridors of the Kremlin….Wouldn’t be the first time.

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            • True … those of us who simply want Putin to tuck his proverbial tail between his legs and slink off home leaving the rest of us to live our lives in peace are living in a dream world. Real life doesn’t always work out as the fairy tales once led us to believe. Eventually, Putin will be gone, but what devastation will have been wrought in the interim? How many lives lost? How many families destroyed? And how many billions of dollars wasted that could have been used to build and create rather than to destroy?

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              • All very pertinent questions Jill.
                And there is damage done by association such as the disruption in exports from both nations…Like grain supplies to North Africa, and I think some of the little parts which go into computes- Ukraine is in the supply chain there.
                Mostly importantly will be the re-building of Ukraine practically, socially, economically and so forth. Ideally all those assets which have been seized should be channelled there….tough luck guys who lose them….an’t war a kicker?

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                • Ah yes … we tend to forget the “collateral damage” if it doesn’t directly affect us, at least visibly. No doubt the world will be changed by all of this, and much as I try, I cannot see how it will be changed in any positive way. But perhaps that’s just the cynic in me.

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