♫ Hello Dolly! ♫

There are nights, and then … there are n-i-g-h-t-s.  Tonight is a n-i-g-h-t.  They say that “Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast, to soften rocks, or bend a knotted oak”, and there is, quite frankly, nobody that can soothe, soften and bend better than Louis Armstrong.  This one goes out tonight for Roger & Sheila … and their special Dolly!


According to SongFacts …

Hello, Dolly! is the title song from the Tony Award-winning 1964 musical which featured Carol Channing in the lead role. In 1969 it was made into a film starring Barbra Streisand. Although the contemporary score was composed in its entirety by Jerry Herman, the play can be traced in one form or another as far back as 1835, in outline at least. In spite of the immediate success of the stage production, the song was released as a single only reluctantly. In its May 23, 1964 edition, the English music paper Melody Maker carried an article “HELLO DOLLY! The hit no one wanted,” which included an interview with Louis Armstrong. Herein it was revealed that although the song had reached #1 in the US charts selling more than a million copies, no one wanted to record it. In retrospect, Satchmo was an obvious choice.

The song won a Grammy for best vocal performance. It was recorded on Kapp by Armstrong and his “All Stars”; the B Side was “A Lot Of Lovin’ To Do.” Five years later, Satchmo appeared in the film version where he dueted with Streisand.

The 62-year-old Armstrong became the oldest act to top the US charts when this reached #1. Four years later Satchmo also became the oldest artist to record a UK #1 when “What A Wonderful World” hit the top spot.  When Armstrong was asked about his new #1 song, he replied, “It sure feels good to be up there with those Beatles.”

There are many great singers who are not entertainers.  They are pure gold to listen to, but painfully boring to watch.  Louis Armstrong, in my book, is a both a singer/musician, and an entertainer.  He is at one with his audience.  He draws you in, he makes you smile, he makes your toes tap.

And now, let’s let Louis take our cares and our worries away for just a few minutes, shall we?

Hello Dolly!
Louis Daniel Armstrong

Hello, Dolly,
Well, hello, Dolly
It’s so nice to have you back where you belong
You’re lookin’ swell, Dolly
I can tell, Dolly
You’re still glowin’, you’re still crowin’
You’re still goin’ strong
We feel the room swayin’
While the band’s playin’
One of your old favourite songs from way back when

So, take her wrap, fellas
Find her an empty lap, fellas
Dolly’ll never go away again

Hello, Dolly,
Well, hello, Dolly
It’s so nice to have you back where you belong
You’re lookin’ swell, Dolly
I can tell, Dolly
You’re still glowin’, you’re still crowin’
You’re still goin’ strong
We feel the room swayin’
While the band’s playin’
One of your old favourite songs from way back when

Golly, gee, fellas
Find her a vacant knee, fellas
Dolly’ll never go away
Dolly’ll never go away
Dolly’ll never go away again

Songwriters: Jerry Herman

24 thoughts on “♫ Hello Dolly! ♫

    • Um … when you say it “blew [your] wife away” … I must ask in what context! 🤣 Did she love it and dance to the music, or did it blow her out the front door screaming for help? Glad you enjoyed the song, my friend! Hugs and cheers

      Liked by 1 person

      • Oh, she loved it. It was part of my repertoire, along with Elvis (much worse), Kermit the Frog, Marvin the Martian, and Yogi and Boo-boo, which was her favorite, and the Lollipop Guild from the Wizard of Oz. The impressions were a surprising revelation. I didn’t do them often so many people were unaware of these things, and they were not in line with my perceived general character. Thus, it astonished her. Hugs and cheers, my friend

        Liked by 2 people

        • Hmmmmm … that’s a really varied repertoire!!! I have an idea! 💡 Why don’t you make a video of you singing that collection and do a post of it!!! I’d love to see that! I can’t wait to see it! Do you think you might manage it this coming week? Hugs and cheers, dear Michael!

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          • LOL – I rarely do those voice any longer. The throat can’t handle the duties, and my voice and nose are still taxed by COVID after effects this week.

            I did do a little Kermit the Frog for my sister at the hospital while visiting Mom today, but not as well as I used to. I also recalled that I used to sing “Rubber Ducky” for my little sisters. Oh, the lost talents of youth! Hugs and cheers

            Liked by 1 person

            • I hear you! My voice these days is raspy, and that’s putting it mildly. Perhaps after you’ve fully recovered, you’ll be able to do those voices again! I’d love to hear you doing Kermit … my FAVOURITE Muppet! And even though I’ve never had a singing voice, I nonetheless often sing Rubber Ducky! Yes, the lost talents of youth … sigh. Hugs and cheers, dear friend!

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  1. No beasts in that saying – here is the actual quote:

    “Musick has Charms to sooth a savage Breast,
    To soften Rocks, or bend a knotted Oak.
    I’ve read, that things inanimate have mov’d,
    And, as with living Souls, have been inform’d,
    By Magick Numbers and persuasive Sound.
    What then am I? Am I more senseless grown
    Than Trees, or Flint? O force of constant Woe!”

    It is from Act I, scene 1, of William Congreve’s 1697 play, The Mourning Bride Congreve is the “he” behind the “they” who say it). The “savage Breast” is a metaphor for anger.

    That play is also the source of one of the most misquoted lines in the history of English literature. From Act III, scene ii:

    “Heav’n has no rage, like love to hatred turn’d, nor hell a fury, like a woman scorn’d.”

    Many years ago, I held forth on those two and other misquotes. It’s something of a hobby with me.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Ah … well … thank you for the clarification. However, when I think of ‘savage’, I don’t really think of ‘breasts’ as being savage, whereas ‘beasts’ often can be. So, it just makes more sense that way! 🙂

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  2. Pingback: ♫ Hello Dolly! ♫ — Filosofa’s Word | Ned Hamson's Second Line View of the News

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