The Never-Ending Mind of Filosofa

I think many of us are still focused on the election results and what it all means going forward as a nation, and I am no exception. Try as I might to put it out of my mind, it keeps coming back like a boomerang.  I’ve been doing a lot of thinking these past couple of days/nights, and I thought I’d share just a few of my thoughts with you.


There is much reason to be relieved by the results of Tuesday’s election, but … I would urge caution – it was not a sweeping mandate.  Republicans had more to do with their own losses than Democrats did with their wins.  They pandered to Trump, let him choose the candidates, and as usual Trump chose poorly.  Trump’s criteria was two-fold:  to earn his support, the candidate had to pretend to believe the 2020 election was ‘stolen’ from Trump, and the candidate had to swear an oath of loyalty to Trump … not to the Republican Party, not to the country, but to one single ‘man’, Donald Trump.  Even a number of Republicans were, as is now obvious, offput by the unqualified candidates Trump chose to support and it was that, more than anything else, that drove some of the Republican losses this week.  The Supreme Court also played a role, unwittingly, in the unexpected Democratic wins with their decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health Organization.  People care about their rights. It would behoove our politicians and our Supreme Court Justices to keep that in mind.  The government exists to serve the people, not the other way around.


Republicans seem to have forgotten the actual purpose of government’s existence.  As Lincoln said in his Gettysburg Address, government is to be “of the people, by the people, and for the people” … the operative word here being ‘people’.  All people.  Democrats’ policies are primarily people-centric, while Republicans seem more interested in making the nation wealthy, but only for a few at the expense of the rest of us.  While I won’t go so far as to say that nobody should have more than another person, I will say that I find anyone who has millions or billions of dollars to his name to be obscenely, grotesquely uncaring about humanity.  Sure, if you work hard, you make your company successful, you should reap the rewards, but not to the point of having billions of dollars while other people in your country, your own city, are going to bed hungry at night.  THAT is simply inexcusable.  And yet, that is what the Republican Party stands for.


I have heard it said that there is no real danger of an autocracy taking over in the U.S., for we have the Constitution.  Folks, the Constitution is a document, and like any document, it is only as good as the people who are in charge of upholding it.  A document can be destroyed, can be altered, can be burned.  It is a concept, a foundation upon which we build, but it is not indestructible.  It relies on the people we elect to defend and uphold it, and … AND it relies on We the People to agree to honour it by ensuring those we elect to support the Constitution, actually do so.  I wonder how many voters in this country have actually read the U.S. Constitution?  It’s only just over 8,000 words, including the 27 amendments, just about the length of 8 of my blog posts. And the language is simple enough for anyone who can read at a 9th grade level to understand.

The document was intended to grow along with the nation, not to be a set-in-stone, unwavering set of laws.  The framers knew that times would change, situations would evolve that might require additions or alterations, and they fully expected those additions and alterations, expected the document to grow with the times.  And to an extent, it has.  Women were given the right to vote in the 19th Amendment, ratified in 1920, just barely over a century ago.  It was the 26th Amendment, ratified in 1971, that gave 18-year-old citizens the right to vote – this came about largely due to the war in Vietnam and the case was made that if an 18-year-old was old enough to risk their life for their country, they should have a voice in our government.  The last amendment passed was the 27th, in 1992, that disallows members of Congress from granting themselves pay raises that would take effect prior to the next election.  1992 … 30 years since the last amendment to the Constitution.  A lot has changed in that time, and the document is sorely in need of some updating, but back to the point … it could be destroyed without too much ado.  It is a safeguard, but … just as your home is your safeguard against the elements, wild animals and wild people, your home can be broken into, burned down … destroyed.  So can the Constitution.  So can democracy.

107 thoughts on “The Never-Ending Mind of Filosofa

  1. They need to ungerrymander all those cheating districts, like where Desenseless added 5 illegal seats. Obviously Texas learned nothing it seems. But yay for Pennsylvania. Tomorrow Conald will announce he’s running again. The world shakes their head that not only Garland still lets him roam free, but after all his crimes that he’s allowed to run is beyond most people’s comprehension. Hopefully, Desenseless and Conald will get split votes and knock each other out in 2024. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t know, my friend. The next couple of years will be interesting, for sure. You’re right … the U.S. needs to be prepared to step up to the plate and defend/protect our allies, but right now, we are at war within our nation. Half the country want to be an island unto itself, while the other half of us want to be a part of a global world where we all work together toward peace and survival of humanity. Sigh. xx

      Liked by 1 person

  2. YOUR CONSTITUTION IS ONLY AS STRONG AS THE PEOPLE WHO SUPPORT IT. Unfortunately almost 50% of Americans have decided or been convinced that Autocracy or maybe Theocracy(of an all-white, stick up the bum type) is your best bet for survival. It would be worth reminding them that they didn’t like Autocracy when they had it before and that America was founded on an anti-Theocracy ticket.
    Cwtch

    Liked by 4 people

    • You’re exactly right, but my hope is that some are beginning to wake up and ‘smell the coffee’, or ‘see the lay of the land’. We came close to ensuring an autocracy in the next few years, but … common sense and decency, concern for people, caring about the whole rather than a small chip of it, won the day (mostly). Will we be so lucky next time? Maybe not, if we don’t convince our fellow citizens that the path of racism & bigotry, of theocracy, of autocracy, is NOT in the best interests of the whole.
      Cwtch, Cariad

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Too close to call… a real nail biter!
    As of Friday morning, with about 99% of the vote counted, Ms. Boebert had 50.2% of the vote, to 49.8% for Mr. Frisch, a difference of less than 900 votes. The Associated Press has not made a call in the race.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Boebert may well retain her seat, but while she is an annoyance, she is likely to be just as ineffective over the next two years as the last two. She’s like a fly on the wall … she annoys me, but I don’t take her very seriously.

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                  • That is an interesting point you’ve raised Jill. There is this theological / ethical question. Assume you reached Heaven and found Hitler there? What would be your reaction?
                    The following on response, based on the teachings of Jesus would be to ‘rejoyce’
                    (Luke 15:7 “I say unto you, that likewise joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance”. )
                    And naturally in response most folk would say something along the lines of:
                    ‘That’s a load man! The guy causes all that evil, says ‘sorry’ and gets away with it??. Gimme a break!’
                    Now here’s the kicker though. Repentance has to come from deep, I mean real deep.
                    Think of those times over the years when we have screwed up and the ‘Ouch! What was I thinking of???’ still pinches us down over the years……
                    Right then, imagine Hitler, in The Bunker, in those last minutes suddenly has a:
                    ‘What have I done’ interlude, I mean the whole weight of all he did comes crashing in one him, right down into the depths of his soul. The remorse, the responsive pain, anguish, desperation, regret doesn’t cover it. And he bares all that he is and begs forgiveness. Now since according to most Faiths, Time in The Beyond is quite different from ours- How long would that period of remorse continue? What would the release of his anguish and admission of wrong doings cause in vibrations within and without of the Cosmos?
                    Teachings indicate even at that last moment repentance could be accepted….Of course that would involve facing up to all the victims to and begging of them, who if they are ‘Up there’ would forgive him, and he would feel wretched and walk a path of calling for forgiveness in Time & Space beyond our understanding……
                    It all comes with a price.
                    And that’s what true religion and faith should be about……

                    Annndd that’s me Talking The Talk…
                    Wanna hang around and watch me trip over my own feet as I try and Walk The Walk?
                    🙃

                    Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: The Never-Ending Mind of Filosofa. |jilldennison.com | Ramblings of an Occupy Liberal

  5. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:

    Exactly like a boomerang … “It is a safeguard, but … just as your home is your safeguard against the elements, wild animals and wild people, your home can be broken into, burned down … destroyed. So can the Constitution. So can democracy.”

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Sure, if you work hard, you make your company successful, you should reap the rewards, but not to the point of having billions of dollars while other people in your country, your own city, are going to bed hungry at night. THAT is simply inexcusable.

    Worth repeating. I’m fed up with being accused of being ‘envious’ whenever I rant about the obscenely rich and the need to rebalance wealth inequality, which is growing all too rapidly across the entire planet.

    “If you’re so smart, why ain’t you rich?” is a question easily riposted by “I value things other than inedible munny and shiny status symbols.”

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hey, my friend! I wasn’t accusing you or anybody, even myself, of being envious of wealth. I’m not envious … I have zero desire to be wealthy, but if I suddenly won a billion-dollar lottery, I would give away all but enough to ensure my family could survive for the rest of their lives. I despise any who hoard their wealth, who don’t give a flying fig that people go to bed hungry at night, or have to choose between paying the rent or taking their asthmatic child to the doctor. If there were one thing I could change in this world, it would be the distribution of wealth … and the destruction of the environment.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ugh. Sorry. My bad! Your words just triggered a rant. Almost every time I bring up the subject of wealth inequality in conversation, I’m met with puzzlement; most folk seem to think that it’s ‘normal’ and ‘natural’ for some to have so much when others have so little, and the knee-jerk response in such cases is to accuse me of envy. Copy-paste your comment above into mine here, because that’s exactly the way I think, too.

        I apologise for taking this post off-topic, even though it’s kind of intertwined; until we can resolve wealth inequality we have little chance of resolving the issues with democracy (which, at present, is more like ‘one dollar one vote’), ending the ravaging of our planet, and offer some hope that our civilization may yet survive. I believe that all begins with waking folks up to the reality of the perception of the extent of wealth inequality, because most seem blissfully unaware and thus happy with the status quo.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Indeed, I share your frustration. Far too many times I’ve been told that those who earn it should be able to keep their wealth. My answer to that is twofold: First, most of them didn’t ‘earn’ it but were born with a silver spoon in their mouth and a sense of entitlement. Second, how any human can sleep at night knowing that they have so much more than they could possibly need while others here and elsewhere are literally dying of starvation and disease, is beyond me.

          No apology is necessary, my friend. This is how my mind works, too … it morphs from one topic to the next and when I feel strongly about something, as I do the lack of conscience among the wealthy, or those who deny climate change, then I’m inclined to rant. Actually some of my rants have been among my most-read posts! Anyway, don’t apologize — I fully understand but just wanted to make sure you knew I wasn’t accusing you of wealth-envy! I think that you and I think very much alike in most things.

          Liked by 1 person

  7. My people ask me all the time “How are you doing”. I have take to answering “Not dead yet” at which everyone gives a sideways laugh. It was in serious doubt just 2 yrs ago lol. Is Karma a punishment or a reward? Be happy or fake it, same thing.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Thank you for the background information. You know, elections and the insecurity around it was in the news but, as you can imagine, not as much as in the US. So, that was interesting to read. It made me ponder. Actually, making trump part of the election process, the Republicans supported the win of the Democrats.

    Liked by 2 people

    • My pleasure, Erika! Our system is unlike others in many ways and sometimes difficult to fully understand, even for people like me who have spent their lifetime studying it! Trump somehow cast a spell over Republicans and convinced them that they must do as he says, else pay the price “WHEN” he is president again. They cower in his presence, but I think they are realizing, since this election, that the people in this country … at least the majority … are tired of Trump’s lies, threats, and corruption. I suspect Trump will pay a price, but he is a bully, and I could get surprised. But, overall I’m satisfied with the results of this election and the message it sends. Republicans will have to step back and re-assess their platform, their ideology (such as it is), before 2024. It will be an interesting, ulcer-inducing two years!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • He is a collection of the worst characters combined in one person, a narcissist, a lier, hungry for power, ego driven, egomaniacal, and the intention behind anything he does is only for his own reward. Although he still has followers, this doesn’t work that way for ever. The people around him tried to save what they could during his presidency… but that is over. However, I am glad too that the Democrats were successful. Let’s cross fingers that this is the way up again!

        Liked by 1 person

        • You are so very right about that! I started out calling him an egomaniac, but upped it to megalomaniac, and even that doesn’t fully describe him! His love, even for his own family, must be earned with complete dedication and loyalty, which is why they all grovel at his feet. He may, in the long run though, divide the Republican Party so badly that they won’t stand a chance in 2024. Time will tell, but meanwhile yes, let’s cross our fingers tightly!

          Liked by 1 person

          • Unconditionality is something that this man may not achieve during this lifetime. But still good that we have him as an example how not to be and to learn (or remember) that his way is not THE way.
            For sure, fingers crossed over here too!

            Liked by 1 person

            • He, like many before him, will go down in history as the example of a failed experiment. At least, that’s what I think. What I hope. But, seeing populism and nationalism on the rise around the globe makes me jittery, I’ll admit. The election of Giorgia Meloni in Italy last month was a blow to democratic foundations around the globe. But on the flip side, Bolsonaro’s loss to Lula in Brazil was definitely encouraging. No peace on Earth just yet, methinks. Sigh.

              Liked by 1 person

  9. Jill, one of the challenges we have is our construct is better than the incumbents who serve it. For some reason, our constitution holds serve even though it is far from perfect. When politicians want to change things these days, we have to ask a key question – why? I have long said that when politicians like Mitch McConnell do anything outside of normal procedure, take it to the bank it is political. So, to be frank there are too many in the halls of government, who truly do not belong to be there as they are some combination of mean-spirited, untruthful and incompetent. I do not trust these folks to do the right thing or the well-reasoned thing.

    The last Senate seat will be whether to place a former football star in the chamber, who frankly has no business representing the state of Georgia. We reelected a very mean-spirited and hyper-partisan Senator in Wisconsin as well as a new one from North Carolina who hid his warts for the election. Call me crazy, but I want statespeople like Rep. Jack Kemp and Senator Bill Bradley who also were former athletes but who were two of the smartest representatives in Congress who studied economics.

    We deserve better than we are getting. I would love to see McConnell say, please vote for Walker’s opponent, as we need better representation in Congress than Walker would give. Keith

    Liked by 4 people

    • I fully agree. And I go back to a point I’ve made many times over the years … our politicians are, in many cases, personally vested in making decisions that are NOT for the common good, but rather for the good of the wealthy. Citizens United vs FEC in 2010 may well prove to have been the very worst decision our Supreme Court ever made. But the other part of that is that it takes a fortune these days to run a viable campaign. With few exceptions (AOC comes readily to mind) there haven’t been many people of modest means who have run successful campaigns. I would love to see limits on the wealth of political candidates so that we would know they actually understand what the average Joe in this country needs.

      I think (fingers crossed) that Warnock stands a good chance at winning in the runoff on December 6th. But you are so right … Herschel Walker has no business even being considered for a seat in the U.S. Senate! That 1.9 million people have voted for him in Georgia is … unbelievable … unconscionable. It speaks volumes about the intellect of voters in that state.

      There was a time when the Republican Party was a viable party, they had values, had a platform. I might not have agreed with them even back then, but … I considered the disagreements to be policy-related and therefore a bi-partisan compromise was within reach in most cases. But today’s GOP is a sick joke … there is no integrity, no platform, no values. I keep thinking they will either need to re-structure or else will crumble, but it hasn’t happened yet.

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      • Jill, you won’t find an argument here. We need a viable conservative voice, but the current vintage is not it. Maybe, the dashed high hopes of this election, even though, the GOP may still carry the House majority, hopefully will be a needed wake-up call. At least, several names, but not enough, did not carry the day and will hopefully leave the public eye. I good friend is so chagrined over Dr. Oz losing, but he deserved not to be in public service after being called before Congress and chastised for endangering people with his many, many miracle cure pitches on his TV show. He need show know better, but did it anyway. Keith

        Liked by 2 people

        • It would seem that H L Mencken acerbic prophecy concerning democracy has come to pass on one occasion in the USA, and twice in the UK

          “As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

          Liked by 2 people

        • Indeed, without two viable political parties, abuses and corruption are almost a given. I’ve never been a fan of conservative policies, but I do applaud the fact that a viable conservative party in addition to a viable liberal party will typically land us somewhere near the moderate middle. Today’s Republican Party, though, has gone off the rails and is not seeking to work toward a better future for us all, not willing to work across the aisle to develop policies and laws that benefit the nation as a whole. Let’s hope this election was a dousing of cold water for those in the GOP who actually care about the country, and that in the future the likes of Dr. Oz will not be considered as legitimate candidates.

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  10. That is an interesting post Jill. Here in the UK we have no written constitution. Judges are not elected but appointed – theoretically by the King but actually through a rather invisible process involving the legal profession and politicians. Whilst their role is to uphold the law they also interpret it and can declare a new law ‘Unconstitutional’ or that due process was not followed. The third arm of Government, the King, can and does advise and nudge the Prime Minister at a weekly meeting. It is a far from perfect system and we have had a fair number of Whackos in seats of power.

    I have to say that here in Wales devolved government has worked well for us. As a small country our Politician tend to have slightly smaller egos! And they are elected by a system of proportional representation which means that no one block holds all the power. There have to be alliances and co-operation to get things done. It has allowed some radical ideas like the One Planet Developement Planning Policy and the Well Being Of Future Generations Act.

    But another big problem. I think, for all governments is that in reality much of the power to shape the world belongs to the multi-millionaires who run global companies and owe allegiance to no Nation State, only to themselves. They are a law unto themselves and expecting them to put our needs above their own is like expecting Turkeys to vote for Christmas (Or Thanksgiving)!

    Liked by 6 people

    • Power does lie in wealth, but piwer also lies in a people united against wealth. I will bet on a people united against wealth every day of the week. But as long as the wealthy continue to prevent us from working together, we have very little power indeed.

      Liked by 3 people

      • We could bring down the likes of Amazon by refusing to shop there, Facebook and Twitter by boycotting them but they are just so very convenient. Do I buy with one click and get my purchase tomorrow or go into town, trail round several shops to find what I want then lug it home? Do I write a letter, put a stamp on it and take it to the post box or do I send an email? Create a poster for an event, print copies and go round pinning them up in shops and on lamp-posts or do I post it on social media? They have us hooked!

        Liked by 1 person

        • How long ago was it that you did all those things, except the email, and thought nothing of it. You were out of your house, getting exercise, meeting people for coffee, etc. etc. etc. (Not just you, all of us!) Covid changed everything, and is still keeping it changed. I have no idea about Facebook, I used it for a few weeks to look for some old friends, and then forgot about it, but my partner Facebooks as much as I Word Press (though she only reads and comments, she makes no posts)! But her and Bezos have this thing going on, or maybe its the delivery driver.
          Still, until Covid goes away, or at least tones down, online shopping and social media are going to rule.
          I found it amazing the Canadian Blockaders and Occupiers bitched about wearing masks, but they loved Go Fund Me and Facebook. They said they wanted freedom, but every one of them is addicted to their social media outlets. Some freedom!

          Liked by 3 people

        • You are 100% right. I’ve said more than once that I’m quitting Amazon, but … at the end of the day, I can get all my monthly cleaning supplies delivered to my door for about 75% of what I would pay for them locally, and I don’t have to leave my house. I can do all my Christmas shopping from the comfort of my desk. That has a lot of value for us all. Sigh. Yep, we are hooked and I’m certainly no exception.

          Liked by 2 people

    • Our judges are also appointed, by the president but they must be confirmed by a majority of the Senate. Question #1: If you have no constitution, how can a law be ‘unconstitutional’? Sure, yours is an imperfect system, as is ours, and as is every political system in the world. There is no perfect system. There are a number, including democracy and socialism, that I think look perfect on paper, but then when you factor in humans and human nature, they fall apart!

      Question #2: You mention the government of Wales, and I know that Wales, like Scotland, England, and Northern Ireland is its own country, yet part of the United Kingdom. But, doesn’t Wales, like the others, fall under the laws of the UK? Or is it rather like our various state governments? Can, for example, Wales decide to sign/seal a trade agreement with France, without the approval of the UK government? I ask out of genuine curiosity, for I’m trying to understand more about how things work on your side of the pond.

      Indeed, I think that wealth is the biggest hurdle in EVERY nation. It is the wealthy in both of our countries that are keeping governments from enacting strict environmental policies and committing to end the use of fossil fuels. It is the wealthy who donate huge sums to ‘buy’ politicians, to ensure that THEIR interests are looked after before ours. This is why I lean (heavily, these days) toward Socialism in a modified form.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Q 1. We have an unwritten constitution – which makes the dance between Patliament and the Judiciary interesting! When we were in the European Union Judges could rule that an Act from the UK Parliament was not consistent with European Union Law. And now tehy might rule that it conflicts with another law or with a Human Right. Whilst the Government has a say in who is appointed to a Judicial post Parliament has no overt say. It seems largely to be done on seniority and the respect the profession has for a particular Judge who gets the top jobs.

        Q2. Only some powers are devolved from the UK Parliament to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. In each case the system is different. Scotland can, I think, raise taxes whereas Wales can only spend the money the UK allocates to it. In Nortehrn Ireland where the historic divisions between Catholics and Protestants led to the ‘Troubles’ in the 70’s and 80’s, there are checks so that neither side can have too much power ove the other. The Executive has to have people from both groups which sometimes works but at present they have been unable to work together and devolution has, as I understand it, been suspended. The main issues which Wales controls for itself are Health and Education. So in the Covid Pandemic responses were largely co-ordinated but there were diifferences in the regulations once the main lockdown ended and in how vaccines were rolled out. In Education we have schools where teaching is through the Welsh language and a parallel system of English language schools. Proportions of the two depend on the area and some Secondary (High) Schools are bi-lingual because that makes more sense of the demand. Defence, Immigration, Welfare Benefits are not devolved. Scotland has already had one referendum on becoming independent of the UK which was lost and may well have another one before long if the polls show it would be won. If that happens I suspect a similar movement would gain momentum in Wales.

        I have to admit that your questions are showing up my ignorance! Thank you for asking them – I will try to do some homework!

        Liked by 2 people

        • I think that was a very worthy summary.
          It says much about the state of the UK’s politics in comparison with that of the USA, that in spite of all our challenges and maladministrations, when we see the antics of the Republican Party we can still say of us ‘It could be worse,’

          Liked by 2 people

          • I agree, Roger … on all counts! He did provide a very worthy summary, and yes, you can look across the big pond and be thankful for your own system and the people who largely make it work without taking to vigilante ‘justice’.

            Liked by 1 person

            • We have our flaws, but cannot sit back and indulge on them as simply ‘being British’. We may fudge our way through one political crisis after another, but currently our NHS, Education, Police, Justice System, Care Systems, Welfare Systems, Rail Networks, Wide-spread Financial Hardship and Housing; to name but a few are all in crisis.
              We also face a scenario where in post-Brexit the four nations which make up the UK could drift apart, for better or for worse.
              We do not face the threat of fascist militias you do in the USA, but structural collapse of the current UK by other factors is possibility.
              Cameron was guilty of crass complacency in allow the demon of Brexit to be a voting issue.

              Liked by 1 person

        • Thank you so much! Though you say you need to do your homework, I think you are very knowledgeable! You’ve helped clarify things a bit for me, for sure. I must say that if we had an unwritten constitution here in the U.S., all would be chaos … even more so than it already is! I know you’ve had your problems over there, but overall, given the confusion of Brexit and four separate countries all rolled into one nation, I think you’ve done remarkably well. Thank you for helping me understand a bit more about your system!

          Liked by 2 people

  11. Those who overturn had better have a solid, long-term plan, devoid of individual personalities.
    These elections are certainly in the category of ‘It Could Have Been Worse’
    (Sorry about this recurring theme, but I’m working my way through a very long and interesting two part tome on the British in 1937-1947)
    This comes across to me as a sort of Dunkirk scenario. The Democrats (British Army) could have been cut off and cut to pieces but thanks to a combination of circumstances and resolve have managed to get away, and left Opposition claiming triumph but secretly cursing missed opportunities (mostly self-inflicted). However, looking to Churchill (again)…I reference the speech he made post-Dunkirk.
    “We must be very careful not to assign to this deliverance the attributes of a victory. Wars are not won by evacuations.” (or replacing the last phrase to the current result of the Mid-Terms – ‘Struggles for the souls of nations are not won by the disappointments of the Opposition’).
    Thus far, though, there has been demonstrated a stirring by the Moderates and Liberals to cast off the extremists who have burrowed into the body of the Republican Party. This is far better than my own gloomy, near apocalyptic suggestions, which leads to a Long-Term Communal Strife and scattered insurrections, which the current republican Hijackers would be woefully inept at dealing with (Authoritarian control over five time zones, 2800 + miles south to north, 300+ million people with a history of independent notions……. gimme a break- not even Bejing central has ever had 100% and they have nearly two thousand years practice, and The Kremlin lost whole chunks, which it’s still trying to work on)…Whoops off topic a bit there.
    These results suggest the slivers of light might be breaking through and the candles have not been blown out. Still a long hard road, and dependent upon the gift of a vicious in-fight within The Republican Party for its own soul.

    Liked by 3 people

    • There is no plan … no plan A nor plan B in the Republican’s playbook, my friend. Their only goal is to “own the Libs” as they call it, to defeat Democrats (Capital ‘D’) and democrats (small ‘d’) at every possible turn. If, at some point, they are handed the keys to the castle and asked what they plan to do with it, their response will be, “Uh … gosh … I dunno.”

      As usual, Churchill’s words are spoken with the wisdom of history. And you are right … we cannot extrapolate long-term victory based on the desire of people on both sides of the aisle to be rid of the extremists. What I think will happen is the Republicans will learn from this, will regroup, perhaps even push Donald Trump out of the ring for good, and promote more reasonable, moderate candidates. That, in itself, would be good for the entire nation. But, we still have some insoluble problems that will continue to be the things that divide us. One is the ‘entitlement’ to wealth, another is the environment vs wealth, another is human rights — women’s rights, Black rights, LGBTQ rights.
      Thus far, this election was a relief in many ways, but it is by no means the end of the divisiveness and thus the threat to democracy in the U.S.

      Sigh.

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      • To repeat Jill, a long, hard, road.
        Democracy and Liberalism have to admit that they took their collective eyes off of the ball and have nearly lost the USA.
        History should have been paid attention to, and the antics of the Right not indulged as sources of entertainment ‘Because it will never happen’.
        We’re all guilty of it.
        Vigilance at all times.
        And some of us have to accept that Full Socialism will not be achieved in the foreseeable future. We just keep the candle alight and buy time for better folk to arise and prosper.
        Long, hard, road Jill. Long, hard road.
        In the words of another:
        ‘I might get to see the Promised Land…’

        Liked by 1 person

        • ‘Tis true that we are all guilty of complacency, of believing the best in our fellow humans and thinking that “it can’t happen here”. But what I don’t understand is the 180° difference between people like you, me, and 99% of my readers versus those who think domination is a good thing, who think that people with a difference colour of skin, different religion, or different gender identification are somehow unworthy of equality. It is a long hard road, my friend, and sometimes I envy those who believe that there is some method to the madness, some higher power in control, whether it be God, Allah, or whomever.

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          • Aye Jill, ’twas ever thus’.
            Firstly by paradox my emotional response is domination to ensure pure equality and a state free from free which means those who discriminate either make the personal effort to change their ways or get re-educated in special schools, and those who still refuse- never get out. A system which works OK on paper but would be open to so many abuses in the real world.
            On the religious side (I have a post brewing here, but other things get in the way), I, personally believe that God laid out how it should be, but also gave us free-will, and in many cases we have been and still are abusing that gift; hence the constant suffering. I’ll stop there because things need to be explored in ‘that post’- whenever I can formulate it into a readable and viable format (I have three of those tucked away on my political blog)

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            • I’ve long since concluded that there are no real solutions, that human nature has some form of bigotry programmed into its DNA. Some of us overcome it early in life, perhaps through our exposure to people of different backgrounds, ethnicities, etc. But it seems that no matter how many laws there are, people will find ways to treat those they perceive as ‘other’ with less dignity, less respect, less toleration than those who look, act, and think like they do. If we haven’t solved the problem after all these thousands of years, it ain’t likely we ever will. Now, if scientists could figure out which cell in the brain causes all this ignorance, and find a way to remove it from every person at birth …

              And I’ll tippy-toe around the thoughts on religion, for you know my views and I would not wish to offend anyone. I will, however, look forward to your post!

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              • And we are back to that question of ‘Evolution’, be it Social, Political, Economic or even Physical (though that does take some time outside of our Human attention span – ‘thousands of years’ in Life’s journey ‘that’s buttons’).
                I was saying to Annie, and I may have mentioned to you to; rawgod may have something there, and perhaps we can evolve there, it’s up to the rest of us to buy his kind mindset time to evolve out of the few and spread, it has been tried before and being hijacked by the flawed, maybe this time, maybe.
                Hope. We can but nurture Hope.

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  12. Possibly prophetic words, Jill, but let us hope not. There are elements in America who want to destroy the Constitution, and you (general voice) just passed the first trial. There is no set number of trials. But there is a set number of losses. That number is set at 1!

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