♫ We Don’t Need Another Hero ♫

For some reason, this song popped into my head a couple of nights ago, and I bookmarked it for future reference.  I don’t know if somebody mentioned it, or if it just popped in through one of the many holes in my mind, but here it is and it won’t likely leave until I share it!

Written by Terry Britten and Graham Lyle, this is the theme song to the film Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome. The third installment of the post-apocalyptic Mad Max series finds star Mel Gibson at the mercy of a nefarious leader named Aunty Entity, played by Tina Turner, who is determined to secure her power over Australia’s Bartertown.  Now, I have never seen a movie by the title of Mad Max, nor am I likely to in this lifetime, much as I do love Tina Turner, her voice, her persona, and her music.

It was Turner’s first film role in over a decade, the previous being The Acid Queen in the Who’s 1975 rock opera Tommy. But the glamorous ruler, clad in a chain-mail gown, wasn’t quite what Turner had in mind for her big-screen comeback.

“Aunty Entity was not as fierce as I wanted her to be.  I wanted her to go back into the trunk and pull out the clothes that she was wearing when she built that city, because she built herself up from nothing and she definitely wasn’t wearing that chain dress and those high-heeled shoes.”

Okay … um … whatever, I guess.

On the heels of Turner’s multiplatinum album Private Dancer, the song was released as a 7″ single, an extended version was released as a 12″ single and on the film’s soundtrack album. In the UK, a shaped picture disc was also released.

The power ballad received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Original Song and a Grammy nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance in 1986. As songwriters, Lyle and Britten received the 1985 Ivor Novello award for Best Song Musically and Lyrically.

This song charted at #1 in Canada, #2 in the U.S., and #3 in the UK … not half bad, yes?

We Don’t Need Another Hero
Tina Turner

Out of the ruins
Out from the wreckage
Can’t make the same mistake this time

We are the children
The last generation (the last generation)
We are the ones they left behind

And I wonder when we
Are ever gonna change, change
Living under the fear
‘Til nothing else remains

We don’t need another hero
We don’t need to know the way home
All we want is life beyond the Thunderdome

Looking for something
We can rely on
There’s gotta be something better out there

Love and compassion
Their day is coming (coming)
All else are castles built in the air

And I wonder when we
Are ever gonna change, change
Living under the fear
‘Til nothing else remains

All the children say
We don’t need another hero
We don’t need to know the way home
All we want is life beyond the Thunderdome

So, what do we do with our lives?
We leave only a mark
Will our story shine like a light
Or end in the dark
Is it all or nothing?

We don’t need another hero
We don’t need to know the way home
All we want is life beyond Thunderdome

All the children say
(We don’t need another hero)
We don’t need another hero
(We don’t need to know the way home)
(All we want is life beyond the Thunderdome)

Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: Lyle Graham Hamilton / Britten Terence Ernest
We Don’t Need Another Hero lyrics © Wb Music Corp., Goodsingle Ltd., Hornall Brothers Music Limited

♫ We’ve Only Just Begun ♫

In all honesty, I had a brief hour or so this evening when I decided I would stop my music posts.  A couple of friends have been hyper-critical because I play only the music that I like and am not open to their suggestions, most of which I find I simply don’t enjoy.  I have said since my very first music post that I’m open to suggestion, but if I don’t like a song you suggest, I won’t play it here.  Music, like many other things, is a matter of personal preference.  What makes me smile might make somebody else tune out, and that’s okay!  I don’t eat octopus, but I have a friend who loves it.  And that’s okay too.  So, ultimately I am not stopping my music posts and I will always welcome ideas and suggestions — just understand that if I don’t like them, I won’t play them and that doesn’t make me weird!  Music should bring joy, right?

This song by the Carpenters actually started out as a bank commercial!  Songwriters Paul Williams and Roger Nichols were commissioned by an advertising agency to write it in 1968 for Crocker Bank, which was trying to attract young people and newlyweds to their institution.  According to Paul Williams …

“It had all the romantic beginnings of a bank commercial’ is the way I describe it. There was actually a wonderful writer named Tony Asher who wrote for this ad agency, and he’d had a skiing accident and he broke his arm, so he couldn’t write or play the piano or whatever. So he suggested Roger Nichols and I as replacements to write this ad. The ad agency called us and said, “Look, we’re going to show a young couple getting married, driving off into the sunset, and it’s going to say, ‘You’ve got a long way to go, we’d like to help you get there to the Crocker Bank.'” And I went, Okay, what rhymes with Crocker? Crocker what? And they said very specifically, “No we don’t want a jingle.” What they asked for is what we would today call a music video. It was going to show a young couple getting married, driving off into the sunset. After the ceremony, the first kiss and all. So Roger and I wrote the song that would play over that.

We wrote the first two verses of ‘We’ve Only Just Begun.’ We wrote a second version of the commercial that was a verse, and what became the bridge. We added a third verse just in case anybody would ever want to record it. And then I assumed that it would never, ever get cut again. Richard (Carpenter), I guess, heard me singing it on the TV commercial, and called and asked if there was a complete song. And we went, ‘Well, funny you should ask.’ And if there hadn’t been a complete song, we would have lied and said, ‘Well, of course there is,’ and then sat down and written it. You know, songwriting in those days was like that, too. I remember finishing songs in the back seat of a publisher’s car on the way to play it for a producer. I retained my rights as a writer, and the publisher retained his rights as well.”

The song was originally recorded by Smokey Roberds, a friend of Nichols, singing under the name of “Freddie Allen”. It debuted within a wedding-themed television commercial for Crocker National Bank in California in the winter of 1970, with Paul Williams on vocals.  The song played over footage of a couple getting married and just starting out. In the song, direct reference to the bank was left out, in part to make the song more marketable. The commercial turned out to be very popular, but it attracted customers in which the bank was not interested: young adult customers with no collateral for loans.

Richard Carpenter saw the TV commercial and guessed correctly that Williams was the vocalist (both of them were under contract to A&M Records). Carpenter ran into Williams on the record company’s lot and asked whether a full-length version was available. Although the TV commercial had only two verses and no bridge, Williams stated that there was a bridge and an additional verse, forming a complete song, which was then delivered.

According to Williams in the documentary Close to You: Remembering The Carpenters

“We’d had some success with songs before, a few album cuts and some B-sides – but no singles. This was a major break, a chance to get an A-side and maybe even a hit, so we would have absolutely lied through our teeth if there wasn’t a full song.”

Williams went on to write several more hits for the Carpenters, as well as songs for Barbra Streisand, Carole King and Three Dog Night. He also worked on many films as both a songwriter and an actor, composing the classics Evergreen from A Star Is Born and Rainbow Connection for The Muppet Movie.

We’ve Only Just Begun charted at #1 in Canada and #2 in the U.S.  Although it only charted at number 28 in the UK Singles Chart in 1970, its subsequent growth in popularity in the UK saw it voted second in The Nation’s Favourite Carpenters Song, broadcast by ITV in 2016.

We’ve Only Just Begun
Carpenters

We’ve only just begun to live
White lace and promises
A kiss for luck and we’re on our way
(We’ve only begun)

Before the risin’ sun, we fly
So many roads to choose
We’ll start out walkin’ and learn to run
(And yes, we’ve just begun)

Sharing horizons that are new to us
Watching the signs along the way
Talkin’ it over, just the two of us
Workin’ together day to day
Together

And when the evening comes, we smile
So much of life ahead
We’ll find a place where there’s room to grow
(And yes, we’ve just begun)

Sharing horizons that are new to us
Watching the signs along the way
Talkin’ it over, just the two of us
Workin’ together day to day
Together
Together

And when the evening comes, we smile
So much of life ahead
We’ll find a place where there’s room to grow
And yes, we’ve just begun

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Paul Williams / Roger Nichols
We’ve Only Just Begun lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, Tratore, DistroKid

♫ Against All Odds ♫

I have a few “go-to” artists when I am in need of a pick-me-up, as I am tonight.  I’ve been under the weather all day and just needed a voice to soothe me.  Among those favourites are of course Stevie Wonder, Lionel Richie, Kenny Rogers, and Phil Collins.  So, searching back through the archives, I’ve played this one only once and it’s been two years, so … I shan’t apologize but only hope that you enjoy Phil Collins as much as I do!


Released in 1984 this was the first of seven US solo #1 hits for Collins, all of which charted in the ’80s. He was still charting hits with Genesis during this time as well, including the #1 Invisible Touch in 1986.  Collins had originally written the song for his album Face Value, but then decided against its inclusion.  The song likely would have gone unnoticed had not film director Taylor Hackford asked Collins to write a song for the film Against All Odds.

“Against All Odds was written in the same misery that the rest of Face Value came from, but I wasn’t drawn to it initially. I didn’t like it as much as ‘You Know What I Mean,’ and I thought there was only room for one of those on the album. I don’t know what would have happened to it if Taylor Hackford hadn’t got in touch.”

And in a 2007 interview, Collins recalled …

“That song was written during my first divorce. My first wife and the kids had gone and I was left there. The song was written out of experience as opposed to a ‘what if’ song. If that personal stuff had not happened to me at the time, I probably would never have made an album, and if I was to have made an album eventually, it probably would have been a jazz/rock thing. Without that stuff I wouldn’t have felt the stuff I felt sitting at a piano night after night, day after day writing stuff.”

This won Collins the 1984 Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance. It was nominated for a Best Original Song Oscar, but lost to Stevie Wonder’s I Just Called To Say I Love You.

Against All Odds
Phil Collins

How can I just let you walk away,
Just let you leave without a trace?
When I stand here taking every breath with you, ooh ooh
You’re the only one who really knew me at all

How can you just walk away from me
When all I can do is watch you leave?
‘Cause we’ve shared the laughter and the pain
And even shared the tears
You’re the only one who really knew me at all

So take a look at me now
Well there’s just an empty space
And there’s nothing left here to remind me
Just the memory of your face
Ooh, Take a look at me now
Well there’s just an empty space
And you coming back to me is against the odds
And that’s what I’ve got to face,

I wish I could just make you turn around
Turn around and see me cry
There’s so much I need to say to you
So many reasons why
You’re the only one who really knew me at all

So take a look at me now
Well there’s just an empty space
And there’s nothing left here to remind me
Just the memory of your face

Now Take a look at me now
‘Cause that’s just an empty space
But to wait for you is all I can do
And that’s what I’ve got to face

Take a good look at me now
‘Cause I’ll still be standing here
And you coming back to me is against all odds
It’s the chance I’ve got to take
Take a look at me now

Writer/s: Phillip David Charles Collins
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, CONCORD MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC

♫ Ain’t No Mountain High Enough ♫

Since today is Juneteenth, and a special celebration since it is now officially a federal holiday, I thought it only appropriate to play some Motown — in my book some of the best music produced in the U.S.!  Of course, since I feature Motown songs and artists pretty often in these posts, I’ve already played most of my favourites at one point or another … some of them twice.  This one I’ve played only once, two years ago in 2019, so it will be new to many of you.   And Happy Juneteenth!


Ain’t No Mountain High Enough is an R&B/soul song written by the husband/wife songwriting team of Nickolas Ashford & Valerie Simpson in 1966 for the Tamla label, a division of Motown.  Nick Ashford was inspired by an experience when he first moved to New York. He was walking down a Manhattan thoroughfare, determined that New York City would not get the best of him; the words “Ain’t no mountain high enough” popped into his head.

Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell recorded the original version, which peaked at #19 US in 1967. Uriel Jones of The Funk Brothers, who played the drums on Gaye and Terrell’s original version, recalled …

“Ashford and Simpson had written the song and they always came to the studio with charts. This time was no exception; they came with the song fully written out. The lyrics were written out too. They were one of the few producers and writers who had full charts and made us work from them. They knew 95 percent what they wanted to hear. Johnny Bristol and Harvey Fuqua were the actual producers in charge of the recording. We did the rhythm track first, then they put the horns on second. Then they recorded Tammi Terrell’s vocal, then they did Marvin Gaye’s next. Each vocal was done separately, the singer in the studio with the producer on their own, and they put it all together at the end. You know, I never heard the finished song until I switched on the radio and it was playing.”

British soul singer Dusty Springfield wanted to record the song but Ashford & Simpson declined, hoping it would give them access to the Detroit-based label. As Valerie Simpson later recalled, “We played that song for her (Springfield) but wouldn’t give it to her, because we wanted to hold that back. We felt like that could be our entry to Motown.”

Diana Ross & The Supremes recorded a version of Ain’t No Mountain High Enough which was more faithful to the Terrell-Gaye original version as a duet with The Temptations. That song was an album cut from a joint LP released by Motown Records in 1968 on the two superstar groups, titled Diana Ross & the Supremes Join The Temptations.

In spring 1970, after the Top 20 success of her first solo single, Reach Out and Touch (Somebody’s Hand), Ashford and Simpson had Ross re-record Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.

Motown chief Berry Gordy did not like the record upon first hearing it. He hated the spoken-word passages and wanted the song to begin with the climactic chorus/bridge. It was not until radio stations nationwide were editing their own versions and adding it to their playlists that Ashford and Simpson were able to convince Gordy to release an edited three-minute version as a single. Ross’ version of Ain’t No Mountain High Enough rose up to number one on both the pop and R&B singles charts. Ross received a Grammy nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

I prefer the Marvin Gaye/Tammi Terrell version, but the Diana Ross version is good, as well, so I proffer both!

Ain’t No Mountain High Enough
Marvin Gaye, Tammi Terrell

Listen baby, ain’t no mountain high
Ain’t no valley low, ain’t no river wide enough baby
If you need me call me no matter where you are
No matter how far don’t worry baby
Just call my name I’ll be there in a hurry
You don’t have to worry

‘Cause baby there ain’t no mountain high enough
Ain’t no valley low enough
Ain’t no river wide enough
To keep me from getting to you babe

Remember the day I set you free
I told you you could always count on me darling
From that day on, I made a vow
I’ll be there when you want me
Some way, some how

‘Cause baby there ain’t no mountain high enough
Ain’t no valley low enough
Ain’t no river wide enough
To keep me from getting to you babe

Oh no darling
No wind, no rain
Or winters cold can stop me baby, na na baby
‘Cause you are my goal
If you’re ever in trouble
I’ll be there on the double
Just send for me, oh baby, ha

My love is alive
Way down in my heart
Although we are miles apart
If you ever need a helping hand
I’ll be there on the double
Just as fast as I can
Don’t you know that there

Ain’t no mountain high enough
Ain’t no valley low enough
Ain’t no river wide enough
To keep me from getting to you babe

Don’tcha know that there
Ain’t no mountain high enough
Ain’t no valley low enough
Ain’t no river wide enough
Ain’t mountain high enough
Ain’t no valley low enough

Songwriters: Valerie Simpson / Nickolas Ashford
Ain’t No Mountain High Enough lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

♫ I Hope You Dance ♫

While I was in the shower this evening, a tune popped into my head and I found myself whistling (ever try whistling with water cascading down the front of your face?  I don’t advise it) it, for the lyrics weren’t coming to me, nor was the song title nor the artist.  But for some reason, a little guy with a big nose kept popping into my head.  I finished my shower, and came back downstairs (after drying off and getting dressed) to put on my thinking cap and try to figure out what song this was that had so invaded my … wait a minute … I think a few of the lyrics have come to mind … perhaps I can Google!  And this is what the song was …

Sigh.  Okay, that’s certainly not my usual fare, is it now?  Still, I hope you take a minute to watch it, for it is almost guaranteed to make you smile!  Okay … someone hand me the brain eraser, please, so that I can start over.  NO … I’m not hopping back into the shower in hopes of another such inspiration!  Hmmmm … my thinking machine seems to be in need of an oiling or something, so I am going to borrow a page out of our friend Clive’s book tonight.  This is one of two songs that Clive chose to honour his new granddaughter a few years ago, and I think it expresses something we would all like to say to our children and grandchildren.  So, this one is in honour of you and your granddaughter, Clive, and the one who is soon to arrive!

Written by Tia Sillers and Mark Sanders and released by Lee Ann Womack in 2000, this song went to #1 in Canada, #14 in the U.S. and #40 in the UK.

Tia Sillers, who was going through a painful divorce at the time, said of the song …

“For ‘I Hope You Dance,’ I had written the opening line, ‘I hope you never lose your sense of wonder. I had just broken up with someone, going through a brutal divorce. I needed to get away, so I went to a beach on the Florida Gulf Coast. Sitting on the beach and reflecting about the breakup, I felt so small and inconsequential. But out of this difficult time came the inspiration to write ‘I Hope You Dance.’ As I was leaving the beach, I remember thinking that things weren’t really so bad, that I would get through it. That’s when I came up with the line, ‘I hope you still feel small when you stand beside the ocean.'”

This won the Grammy Award for Best Country Song and also the Country Music Award for Song Of The Year. It was a #1 Country hit and also #1 on the Adult Contemporary charts.  After this became a hit, Sillers and Sanders released a book called I Hope You Dance with writings based on the song.  I’m not typically a fan of country music, but somehow I didn’t realize until tonight that this was considered ‘country’, and no matter … I still like the song!

I Hope You Dance
Lee Ann Womack and Sons of the Desert

I hope you never lose your sense of wonder,
You get your fill to eat but always keep that hunger,
May you never take one single breath for granted,
God forbid love ever leave you empty handed,
I hope you still feel small when you stand beside the ocean,
Whenever one door closes I hope one more opens,
Promise me that you’ll give faith a fighting chance,
And when you get the choice to sit it out or dance.

I hope you dance… I hope you dance…

I hope you never fear those mountains in the distance,
Never settle for the path of least resistance,
Livin’ might mean takin’ chances, but they’re worth takin’,
Lovin’ might be a mistake, but it’s worth makin’,
Don’t let some Hell bent heart leave you bitter,
When you come close to sellin’ out reconsider,
Give the heavens above more than just a passing glance,
And when you get the choice to sit it out or dance.

I hope you dance… I hope you dance.
I hope you dance… I hope you dance.
(Time is a wheel in constant motion always rolling us along,
Tell me who wants to look back on their years
And wonder where those years have gone.)

I hope you still feel small when you stand beside the ocean,
Whenever one door closes I hope one more opens,
Promise me that you’ll give faith a fighting chance,
And when you get the choice to sit it out or dance.

Dance… I hope you dance.
I hope you dance… I hope you dance.
I hope you dance… I hope you dance.
(Time is a wheel in constant motion always rolling us along,
Tell me who wants to look back on their years
And wonder where those years have gone.)

Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: Sanders Mark Daniel / Sillers Tia Maria
I Hope You Dance lyrics © Sony/atv Melody, Choice Is Tragic Music, Soda Creek Songs, Mca Music Publishing, A.d.o. Universal S

♫ ♫ ♫ ♫ ♫

I’m doing something a bit different for tonight’s music post, because I came across a clip of James Taylor appearing on Stephen Colbert’s program (pre-pandemic days … late 2019 or early 2020 I believe) that I found both informative and funny as heck, so I’m sharing that instead of an actual song tonight!  If you still need a song, there is a list of a few of my previous posts by James Taylor at the end of this post!


♫ Summertime Blues ♫

Officially, it isn’t summer yet, but here it sure has felt like mid-summer for the past week or so.  Last week it rained nearly every day, and once the rain stopped, the 90° (F) temperatures kicked in with high humidity.  Hence, I’ve only been able to be outside for about 10 minutes before my lips start turning blue from a lack of that stuff … what’s it called again … oh yeah, oxygen!  Anyway, summer doesn’t officially start here until next Monday, at which time winter will commence for our friends in Oz and other parts south of the equator.

I must admit to cheating a bit tonight.  Y’see, our friend Clive did a really great post with a compilation of summertime songs, and my selection tonight is one that he included on his post, but I’m asking you to please go check out his post for more really great summertime songs!

Written by Eddie Cochran and his manager, Jerry Capehart, this song was released in August 1958 when Eddie Cochran was only 19 years old.  Capehart explained the inspiration for this song …

“There had been a lot of songs about summer, but none about the hardships of summer.”

This was supposed to be the B-side of Love Again, which was written by 17-year-old Sharon Sheeley. It was clear that this was the bigger hit, but Sheeley eventually became Cochran’s girlfriend.  Sheeley provided the hand claps on this. She really wanted to do it, but had trouble getting the rhythm. Eddie helped her out by showing her how to clap.  This was Cochran’s breakthrough hit. His previous singles didn’t do very well, but this gave him a lot of exposure and established him as a star.  Tragically, Cochran died at the age of 21 in a car crash in Bath, Somerset, England just two years after this song was recorded.

Now, this is one of those cases where I find the history of the artist far more fascinating than the story behind the song.  This video (link only) tells a bit about his life, his devotion to music, and his death.

And now, onto cheerier things like … Summertime Blues!

Summertime Blues
Eddie Cochran

Well I’m a gonna raise a fuss, I’m gonna raise a holler
About workin’ all summer just to try an’ earn a dollar
Everytime I call my baby, to try to get a date
My boss says, no dice, son, you gotta work late
Sometimes I wonder what I’m gonna do
‘Cause there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues

Well my mom ‘n papa told me, son, you gotta make some money
If you want to use the car to go ridin’ next sunday
Well I didn’t go to work, told the boss I was sick
Now you can’t use the car ’cause you didn’t work a lick
Sometimes I wonder what I’m gonna do
‘Cause there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues

I’m gonna take two weeks, gonna have a vacation
I’m gonna take my problem to the united nation
Well I called my congressman and he said quote
I’d like to help you son, but you’re too young to vote
Sometimes I wonder what I’m gonna do
‘Cause there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues

Well I’m a gonna raise a fuss, I’m gonna raise a holler
About workin’ all summer just to try an’ earn a dollar
Sometimes I wonder what I’m gonna do
‘Cause there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues

Yeah, sometimes I wonder what I’m gonna do
‘Cause there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues
No there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Eddie Cochran / Jerry Neal Capehart
Summertime Blues lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

♫ Teach Your Children ♫

A friend and I were having a conversation about how far too often we, as parents, instill our own bigotries and hatreds into our children, often without even realizing it.  Religion is guilty of creating so many phobias in children that I would need some extra fingers to count them.  My proposal is that we expose our children to all different sorts of people at a very young age.  Blacks, Hispanics, Muslims, LGBT people … and let them see that these are just people, no different than they themselves in the ways that matter.  If we do this, then we raise young adults who are more caring, more accepting of ‘other’ than past generations.  We break that cycle of homophobia, racism, misogyny, Islamophobia, and much more.  As I was chatting via email with this friend on this topic, a song title came to me … this one … Teach Your Children, by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.

Graham Nash wrote this song when he was a member of The Hollies, though it was never recorded by that group. The lyrics deal with the often-difficult relationship he had with his father, who spent time in prison, but they also speak to the way we interact with and accept others.

Shortly after writing this, Nash visited an art gallery and saw two photographs that crystallized the meaning of the song: Diane Arbus’ “Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park” and Arnold Newman’s portrait of German industrialist Alfried Krupp. Says Nash:

“I put the ‘Hand Grenade’ photograph next to a picture of Krupp, who was the German arms magnate whose company was probably responsible for millions of deaths. It was an eerie photograph, a portrait, and the lighting is weird and his eyes are dark – a great image. And looking at them together I began to realize that what I’d just written [‘Teach Your Children’] was actually true, that if we don’t start teaching our children a better way of dealing with each other we’re f–ked and humanity itself is in great danger.”

This song wasn’t wildly popular, although it reached #8 in Canada and #16 in the U.S. but did not chart in the UK or much of anywhere else.  Although never one of my top ten favourites, I did like the song, but was completely unaware of the background (or most of the lyrics) until tonight.

Teach Your Children

Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young

You, who are on the road
Must have a code that you can live by
And so, become yourself
Because the past is just a goodbye

Teach your children well
Their father’s hell did slowly go by
And feed them on your dreams
The one they pick’s the one you’ll know by

Don’t you ever ask them, “Why?”
If they told you, you would cry
So just look at them and sigh
And know they love you

And you (Can you hear?) of tender years (And do you care?)
Can’t know the fears (And can you see?)
That your elders grew by (We must be free)
And so, please help (To teach your children)
Them with your youth (What you believe in)
They seek the truth (Make a world)
Before they can die (That we can live in)

And teach your parents well
Their children’s hell will slowly go by
And feed them on your dreams
The one they pick’s the one you’ll know by

Don’t you ever ask them, “Why?
If they told you, you will cry
So just look at them and sigh
And know they love you

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Graham Nash

Teach Your Children lyrics © Nash Notes

♫ I Want To Know What Love Is ♫ (Redux)

I last played this one a couple of years ago in April 2019, and for some reason it is in my head tonight and just won’t leave.  Last night, I played what I thought was a new one here, but it turned out I had played it only three months before, back in March!  That’ll teach me to trust my holey memory, eh?  So, apologies for that misstep!  Even though this is a repeat, I hope you’ll enjoy it, for it is one that I truly love.  And folks … feel free to toss me a few suggestions … if I don’t like them, I won’t play them, but if I do, you’ll be helping me out, for I’m running out of ideas here (obviously, given the number of recent reduxes). 


Foreigner guitarist Mick Jones wrote this song.

“‘I Want To Know What Love Is’ started off on more of a personal level. I’d been through a lot of relationships that eventually failed, and still searching for something that could really endure. And that sort of took a life of its own as well. It became more of a universal feeling. I adjusted that during the recording of it, and ended up putting a gospel choir on it. And you know, realized suddenly that I’d written almost a spiritual song, almost a gospel song. Sometimes, you feel like you had nothing to do with it, really. You’re just putting it down on paper, or coming up with a melody that will bring the meaning of the song out, bring the emotion out in the song.”

According to SongFacts …

Foreigner recorded for Atlantic Records, and their 1981 album 4 spent more weeks at #1 than any album released by the label. Ahmet Ertegun, who was the head of Atlantic, cried when he first heard this song. Mick Jones explains: “Part of my dream at the beginning was to be on Atlantic Records, because of the heritage: all the R&B stars of the ’50s, people like Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin. It meant so much to me and my growing up in music. So it meant a lot to have Ahmet Ertegun, who had been a part of that magical era and a person who I respected and looked up to, come into the studio. I took him aside and I said, ‘I have a song to play you, Ahmet.’ I took him into the studio, and we just sat there in two chairs, and I put the song on. Halfway through I looked over and indeed, there were tears coming out of his eyes. I thought, Whoa, this is a major moment for me. I’ve been able to impress this man who has heard some of the best, and produced some of the best music in the world. And here he is, and I’ve reached him emotionally. By the end of the song we were both in tears. Wonderful moments like that, they’re just very meaningful.”

You know a song is good when it tops the charts in so many nations, as this one did in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, Sweden, the UK and the U.S.

I Wanna Know What Love Is
Foreigner

I gotta take a little time, a little time to think things over
I better read between the lines, in case I need it when I’m older

Now this mountain I must climb, feels like the world upon my shoulders
Through the clouds I see love shine, it keeps me warm as life grows colder

In my life there’s been heartache and pain
I don’t know if I can face it again
Can’t stop now, I’ve traveled so far, to change this lonely life

I want to know what love is, I want you to show me
I want to feel what love is, I know you can show me

I’m gonna take a little time, a little time to look around me
I’ve got nowhere left to hide, it looks like love has finally found me

In my life there’s been heartache and pain
I don’t know if I can face it again
Can’t stop now, I’ve traveled so far, to change this lonely life

I want to know what love is, I want you to show me
I want to feel what love is, I know you can show me
I want to know what love is, I want you to show me
(And I want to feel) I want to feel what love is
(And I know) I know you can show me

Let’s talk about love, I want to know what love is
The love that you feel inside, I want you to show me
And I’m feeling so much love, I want to feel what love is
No, you just can’t hide, I know you can show me
I want to know what love is (let’s talk about love), I know you can show me
I want to feel it too, I want to feel what love is
I want to feel it too, and I know and I know, I know you can show me
Show me love is real, yeah, I want to know what love is

Songwriters: Michael Leslie Jones
I Wanna Know What Love Is lyrics © Somerset Songs Publishing Inc

♫ Superman (It’s Not Easy) ♫

I didn’t do a music post last night and almost didn’t do one tonight, for I am just tired … almost to the point of not caring about much of anything.  But that was before a special friend sent me a lovely email tonight in which she said, “If I may so bold … please allow me to say that you definitely seem to need some suggestions for your music posts …”  Boy is THAT an understatement!  In my present mood … or should I say my mood of the past several weeks, I keep reverting to those songs that warm my heart without really adding anything much new!  The lone suggestion by my darling friend was this one … Superman (It’s Not Easy) by Five for Fighting.  I listened, I remembered, I liked, and so here I shall play!

According to SongFacts …

This song about trying to fit in was written from Superman’s point of view. The superhero is portrayed as misunderstood and not as powerful as people see him: “I’m only a man in a funny red sheet.” Superman may be invincible, but he has feelings too, and while he’s off saving the world he sometimes wonders if anyone thinks about what he is going through.

The song reflects what John Ondrasik (who is Five For Fighting) felt at the time – he released his first album, Message for Albert, in 1997 and it went nowhere. Explaining what led him to write the song, which appeared on his next album, Ondrasik told us it was “frustration about the inability to be heard.”

He later explained: “I’ve learned 10 years later that it’s pretty damn easy to be me. I could never write that song now.”

Interestingly, this song became quite popular after the terrorist attacks on 9/11.

The reflective tone fit very well with the mood of the United States, and many radio stations put it in heavy rotation. Ondrasik heard from emergency workers and others who found it a source of comfort after the attacks.

Ondrasik performed this song on October 20, 2001 at the “Concert For New York,” a tribute to the police, firefighters, and rescue workers involved in the World Trade Center Attacks. It was a very touching moment, and he called this performance “the most important thing I’ll ever do musically.” Ondrasik stood next to James Taylor and Pete Townshend at the end of the show when they all sang “Let It Be.”

The first year or so that this song was out, I thought it had something to do with Sesame Street’s Kermit the Frog, one of my favourite characters, and that the lyrics were “It’s not easy to be green”.  Sigh.  I wonder how many lyrics I have completely scrambled in my lifetime?  Anyway … this song made the charts at #14 in the U.S. and #48 in the UK … I cannot find evidence that it charted in Canada, but did fairly well in a number of countries such as Australia (#2), Belgium (#4), Italy (#11) and Norway (#12).  And now, without further ado other than to thank my friend Ellen …

Superman (It’s Not Easy)
Five for Fighting

I can’t stand to fly
I’m not that naive
I’m just out to find
The better part of me

I’m more than a bird, I’m more than a plane
I’m more than some pretty face beside a train
And it’s not easy to be me

I wish that I could cry
Fall upon my knees
Find a way to lie
‘Bout a home I’ll never see

It may sound absurd, but don’t be naive
Even heroes have the right to bleed
I may be disturbed, but won’t you concede
Even heroes have the right to dream
And it’s not easy to be me

Up, up and away, away from me
Well it’s all right
You can all sleep sound tonight
I’m not crazy or anything

I can’t stand to fly
I’m not that naive
Men weren’t meant to ride
With clouds between their knees

I’m only a man in a silly red sheet
Digging for kryptonite on this one way street
Only a man in a funny red sheet
Looking for special things inside of me

Inside of me, inside of me, yeah
Inside of me, inside of me
I’m only a man in a funny red sheet
I’m only a man looking for a dream
I’m only a man in a funny red sheet
And it’s not easy
Oh, it’s not easy to be me

Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: John Ondrasik
Superman (It’s Not Easy) (iTunes Session) lyrics © Emi Blackwood Music Inc., Colgems-emi Music Inc., Five For Fighting Music