♫ Louie Louie ♫ (Redux)

Sorry, but I have to redux again tonight, for I am just not up to digging around for a song and related trivia tonight.  I last played this one in August 2018, two years ago, and I found that most people preferred the Kingsmen version.


Tonight’s song, Louie Louie, has a bit of an interesting history.  It was recorded in 1963 by The Kingsmen, and in the same year by Paul Revere and the Raiders.  After the release of the song by The Kingsmen in May 1963, the governor of Indiana, Matthew Welsh, banned the song.  Yes, you heard me right … he banned it!  Why?  He found the lyrics to be ‘pornographic’.

Matthew Welsh

Matthew Welsh

In response, the FBI did an investigation, culminating in a 118-page report that essentially concluded that …

“The recording was hurriedly produced and the technique was poor but the record definitely was not obscene.”

Since both versions are just over 2 minutes and since I wasn’t sure which one you would like best, I include both here … pick one or listen to both …

The Kingsmen:

Paul Revere and the Raiders:

Louie Louie
The Kingsmen

Louie Louie, oh no, you take me where ya gotta go, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, baby
Louie Louie, oh baby, take me where ya gotta go

A fine little girl, she waits for me
Me catch the ship across the sea
Me sailed the ship all alone
Me never think I’ll make it home

Louie Louie, oh no no no, me gotta go, oh no
Louie Louie, oh baby, me gotta go

Three nights and days I sailed the sea
Me think of girl constantly
On the ship, I dream she there
I smell the rose in her hair

Louie Louie, oh no, me gotta go, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, baby
Louie Louie, oh baby, me gotta go
Okay, let’s give it to ’em right now

Me see

Me see Jamaica, the moon above
It won’t be long me see me love
Me take her in my arms and then
I tell her I’ll never leave again

Louie Louie, oh no, me gotta go, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, baby
Louie Louie, oh baby, me gotta go
I said me gotta go now
Let’s hustle on out of here
Let’s go

Songwriters: Richard Berry
Louie Louie lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

♫ Dizzy ♫

I had decided to go to bed without posting a song tonight, for I am tired and out of sorts, tried out several songs and none of them were quite what I wanted, so I had, for all intents and purposes, given up.  And then … and then … my dear friend Ellen unwittingly put this song into my head!  No, she didn’t mention either the song or the artist, Tommy Roe.  She didn’t even mention the word “dizzy” … she just made me be … dizzy!

Each of us has a shortcoming … mine is … well, mine are science and poetry.  I am a pragmatist who takes what is said at face value and subtleties, hidden meanings and the like fly high over my head.  So, when Ellen started talking about correspondence of sounds, and a rhyme that doesn’t rhyme, my head started to spin even faster than it had been already and … I got … dizzy!  And all of a sudden, this song popped into my spinning head!  Thank you, Ellen!  I might still not understand the Mark Twain quote that he never said, but I got my song for the night!

Released in 1969, this song hit #1 in the UK, Canada, and the U.S.

Tommy Roe wrote this with Freddy Weller, who went on to become a country singer after a spell as one of Paul Revere’s Raiders.  In 1962, Roe had his first, and only other US #1 hit with “Sheila,” which he wrote when he was 14. He had another hit in 1970 with “Jam Up Telly Tight,” then started recording country songs.  Said Roe …

“Freddy Weller and I had known each other in Atlanta. I was on a TV show with Paul Revere & The Raiders. They had lost their guitarist and I suggested Freddy as a replacement. He moved to California to be with them, and we started writing together. I showed him ‘Dizzy.’ I had written the chorus but couldn’t complete it. Freddy loved it and said, ‘Let’s finish it,’ and we did that on a tour bus late at night. Jimmy Haskell wrote the string arrangement and we had Hal Blaine on drums, Joe Osborn on bass, Ben Benay on guitar and Larry Knechtel on keyboards. You can’t get better than that. It sold 6 million copies, 4 million of them in the States, and it was my biggest hit of all.”

Dizzy
Tommy Roe

Dizzy
I’m so dizzy my head is spinning
Like a whirlpool, it never ends
And it’s you, girl, making it spin
You’re making me dizzy

First time that I saw you, girl
I knew that I just had to make you mine
But it’s so hard to talk to you
With fellas hanging ’round you all the time
I want you for my sweet pet
But you keep playing hard to get
I’m going around in circles all the time

Dizzy
I’m so dizzy my head is spinning
Like a whirlpool, it never ends
And it’s you, girl, making it spin
You’re making me dizzy

I finally got to talk to you
And I told you just exactly how I felt
Then I held you close to me
And kissed you and my heart began to melt
Girl, you’ve got control on me
‘Cause I’m so dizzy I can’t see
I need to call a doctor for some help

Dizzy
I’m so dizzy my head is spinning
Like a whirlpool, it never ends
And it’s you, girl, making it spin
You’re making me dizzy, my head is spinning
Like a whirlpool it never ends
And it’s you girl making it spin
You’re making me dizzy
You’re making me dizzy
I’m so dizzy
You’re making me dizzy

Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: Jamie D Slocum
Dizzy lyrics © Sony/atv Songs Llc, Bike Music

♫ This Is It ♫

This song, written by Kenny Loggins and Michael McDonald, has an interesting and touching etiology.  The two wrote the song after Kenny’s father had a serious heart problem and didn’t’ know what to do about it. So they came up with this song about a man who is suffering terrible pain, looks to find his miracle and needs to “stand up and fight.”

After Loggins won a Grammy for the song in 1980 (Best Male Pop Vocal) he played it for his father, who lived 4 more years.  Says Kenny Loggins of this song …

“The best musical statements are usually the ones that aren’t calculated and the ones that come out in the largest chunks. Michael McDonald and I must have written ‘This Is It’ four times. The first three times it was a love song, ‘Baby I this, baby I that…,’ and we both said, ‘Eh! This is boring. This song is not working as a love song.’

Then I had a fight with my dad when he was going into the hospital because he gave me the feeling that he was ready to check out. He’d given up, he wasn’t thinking in terms of the future, and I was so pissed at him. It was real emotional. That afternoon, I was meeting with Michael to work on new tunes and I walked in and said, ‘Man, I got it. It’s “This Is It”.’ And Michael said, ‘This is it?’ I said, ‘Trust me. This is it.’ But that one took a while.

And then one review said it was your average boy-girl song and the writer didn’t understand why people were making such a big deal out of it. The fact of the matter was, he didn’t understand the song and it didn’t move him because he wasn’t in a situation to be moved. But immediately after that, I got a letter from a girl who had just recently gotten out of the hospital from a life-and-death situation and that was her anthem. She was holding onto it. That means so much more to me. She hadn’t read the press about my father or anything. All she knew was that the song was on the nose for her, exactly what Michael and I intended. That makes you feel like you’re doing something important.”

This Is It
Kenny Loggins

There’ve been times in my life
I’ve been wonderin’ why
Still, somehow I believed we’d always survive
Now, I’m not so sure
You’re waiting here, one good reason to try
But, what more can I say? what’s left to provide?

Are you gonna wait for a sign, your miracle?
Stand up and fight

Make no mistake where you are
(This is it)
You back’s to the corner
(This is it)
Don’t be a fool anymore
(This is it)

The waiting is over, no where to run
No where to hide
No time for wonderin’ why
It’s here, the moment is now, about to decide
Let ’em believe
Leave ’em behind
But keep me near in your heart
Know whatever you do, I’m here by your side

For once in your life, here’s your miracle
Stand up and fight

Make no mistake where you are.
(This is it)
You’re goin’ no further
(This is it)
Until it’s over and done.
(No one can tell what the future holds)
Oh oh oh oh.
(Who makes the choice of how it goes?)
It’s not up to me this time.
(You know)
Comes a day in every life
(This is it)

Make no mistake where you are
(This is it)
You’re goin’ no further
(This is it)
Until it’s over and done
(This is it)
One way or another
(This is it)
(No one can tell what the future holds)
(This is it)
Your back’s to the corner
(This is it)
(You make the choice of how it goes)
(This is it)
(No one can tell what the future holds)
(This is it)
One way or another

Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: Loggins Kenneth Clark / Mc Donald Michael H
This Is It lyrics © Milk Money Music, Tauripin Tunes

♫ Dance With My Father ♫ (Redux)

Every song I looked at or that popped into my head this evening … I had already played.  Nonetheless, I have had a delightful hour or so listening to old favourites!  So finally, I decided on a replay of this one, for it is a beautiful song and one that I love … I hope you will, too.


Luther Vandross, with help from Richard Marx, wrote this song shortly after he suffered a stroke on April 16, 2003, that left him in a coma for two months and eventually killed him two years later on July 1, 2005. The song is a tribute to his late father, and very poignant as it was one of Luther’s last songs. His father died when he was young, and Luther’s most poignant memory of his dad was him dancing in the house with his kids.

At the 2004 Grammy Awards, Vandross, by then confined to a wheelchair, appeared in a pre-taped video segment to accept his Song of the Year Award for “Dance with My Father”, saying, “When I say goodbye it’s never for long, because I believe in the power of love”. 

His last public appearance was on May 6, 2004, on The Oprah Winfrey Show.

I love this song, but it always leaves me with a tear or two.

Dance with My Father
Luther Vandross

Back when I was a child
Before life removed all the innocence
My father would lift me high
And dance with my mother and me
And then
Spin me around ’till I fell asleep
Then up the stairs he would carry me
And I knew for sure
I was loved

If I could get another chance
Another walk
Another dance with him
I’d play a song that would never ever end
How I’d love love love
To dance with my father again

When I and my mother
Would disagree
To get my way I would run
From her to him
He’d make me laugh just to comfort me
yeah yeah
Then finally make me do
Just what my mama said
Later that night when I was asleep
He left a dollar under my sheet
Never dreamed that he
Would be gone from me

If I could steal one final glance
One final step
One final dance with him
I’d play a song that would never ever end
Cause I’d love love love to
Dance with my father again

Sometimes I’d listen outside her door
And I’d hear how mama would cry for him
I’d pray for her even more than me
I’d pray for her even more than me

I know I’m praying for much to much
But could you send her
The only man she loved
I know you don’t do it usually
But Dear Lord
She’s dying to dance with my father again

Every night I fall asleep
And this is all I ever dream

Songwriters: Luther Vandross / Richard Marx
Dance with My Father lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management

♫ Aubrey ♫

Frustratingly, I cannot find much in the way of a backstory or trivia about this song.  David Gates of Bread wrote this song after watching the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s, starring Audrey Hepburn. The song itself had nothing to do with the movie, but the moodiness of the film had set him up to write it.

“I hardly ever write any ‘name’ songs, but I loved that name and the way it flowed in that particular melody. That may be the best melody I’ve ever written.”

It appeared on Bread’s 1972 album Guitar Man. The single lasted 11 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at #15. In Canada the song reached only #41 on the pop singles chart, but reached #6 on the adult contemporary chart. In New Zealand, “Aubrey” reached #8.  The Brits apparently didn’t like it.

Aubrey
Bread

And Aubrey was her name,
A not so very ordinary girl or name
But who’s to blame?
For a love that wouldn’t bloom
For the hearts that never played in tune
Like a lovely melody that everyone can sing,
Take away the words that rhyme it doesn’t mean a thing

And Aubrey was her name
We tripped the light and danced together to the moon,
But where was June
No it never came around
If it did it never made a sound,
Maybe I was absent or was listening to fast,
Catching all the words, but then the meaning going past,

But God I miss the girl,
And I’d go a thousand times around the world just to be
Closer to her than to me

And Aubrey was her name,
I never knew her, but I loved her just the same,
I loved her name
Wish that I had found the way
And the reasons that would make her stay
I have learned to lead a life apart from all the rest
If I can’t have the one I want, I’ll do without the best

But how I miss the girl
And I’d go a million times around the world just to say
She had been mine for a day

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: David Gates
Aubrey lyrics © David Gates D/B/A Kipahulu Music

♫ You Needed Me ♫

Last night I played a song that was co-written by Randy Goodrum, and since the name didn’t ring any bells, I did a bit of research on Mr. Goodrum, which led me to this long-time favourite sung by Anne Murray.

This was the first hit written by Randy Goodrum, a Nashville songwriter and keyboard player.  In an interview, Goodrum explained …

“It was sort of an unconditional undeserved love. How could you love me as if I’m perfect, when I’m not? It was a disclaimer, sort of, for the other person. How could you need me? It’s not exactly the same premise as ‘I wouldn’t belong to a club who’d have me as a member,’ but it’s a small sliver of unconditional love, which to me is a broad piece of pizza that you can take a lot of minute slivers from along the way. I’ve always thought that songs, even positive songs, needed to have a certain amount of shadow in them for the light to be significant. And I think too many songwriters are afraid to offend the world, and they never write anything dramatic. They never put anything negative. But to me, you can have negative in a song, as long as there’s a ray of hope somewhere. Maybe a way out. Not a saccharine, syrupy way out. It’s like in a movie where you see somebody locked in a cave, and suddenly they see a rock fall away and they see a little piece of light come in, they say, ‘Ah, maybe if I work really hard I can get out that way.'”

Anne Murray was struggling with the pressures of juggling her career and her family life with her husband Bill Langstroth and her toddler son William. One day she was going through a box of tapes when she came across a song that expressed just how she was feeling. Unfortunately, only the writer’s name, Randy Goodrum, was on the cassette but her producer researched his name in the phone book and she recorded his song. It became her second U.S. #1 and to this day it remains the favorite of her own recordings.

The song hit #1 in Canada and the U.S., and #22 in the UK.

You Needed Me
Anne Murray

I cried a tear, you wiped it dry
I was confused, you cleared my mind
I sold my soul, you bought it back for me
And held me up and gave me dignity
Somehow you needed me

You gave me strength to stand alone again
To face the world out on my own again
You put me high upon a pedestal
So high that I could almost see eternity
You needed me, you needed me

And I can’t believe it’s you
I can’t believe it’s true
I needed you and you were there
And I’ll never leave, why should I leave?
I’d be a fool ’cause I finally found someone who really cares

You held my hand when it was cold
When I was lost you took me home
You gave me hope when I was at the end
And turned my lies back into truth again
You even called me “friend”

You gave me strength to stand alone again
To face the world out on my own again
You put me high upon a pedestal
So high that I could almost see eternity
You needed me, you needed me

You needed me, you needed me

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Randy Goodrum
You Needed Me lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc, Miranda Millsap D/B/A Ironside Music, Warner Chappell Music Inc

♫ Foolish Heart ♫

These days it’s harder than usual to keep a song in my heart.  I think of one whilst in the shower or up to my elbows in sudsy dishwater, I think I’ll still remember it when I return to the computer, but … POOF … it vanishes into thin air.  Of late, I don’t sing, I whistle … if I even do that.  Usually, I don’t have to go in search of new music for these music posts … the music finds me.  But lately, I admit I’ve struggled to find a song anywhere in my head or heart.  So, tonight when I went in search of, determined to find one that made me want to sing along, this is what I stumbled across.  I’ve always loved this one, especially that one line, “You’ve been wrong before, don’t be wrong anymore”.

This song, written by Steve Perry, formerly of the band Journey, and Randy Goodrum, was performed by Perry from his first solo album, Street Talk. It was released as the fourth single from the album in November 1984 and peaked at #18 in the U.S.

Says Goodrum of the joint effort …

“It seemed like such an unlikely match, Steve and me. Shortly before I flew out, I thought, I’ve got to put together some song ideas or some starts or something. I had this little vamp idea which I said, Well, Steve is calling me probably because he wants a certain thing that I do, so I will give him a piece of what I do. So that little vamp at the very beginning in the general chord progression of the verse was something I brought. He had a little writing room set up and he had this Fender-Rhodes there, and a little Linn machine, and a little Teac 4-track cassette player.

I drove up to the house in this little mid-size rental, and I looked like some guy from Connecticut – I had an English riding cap, and corduroy pants – and he opens the door, and he’s got a fire-engine red jumpsuit, sweat shirt and pants like he’d been exercising at a fire station or something. And hair down to his feet. He was a great guy. Instantly we hit it off, and we were good friends. So we went into the room to kind of kick around, and I played him that little start, and he liked it right away, and he started jamming some melodies.

My style from starting out in Nashville was to write lyrics and music simultaneously. That’s really the style I prefer, because the music is sort of telling you what it’s about from the get-go, and I don’t think he was used to that style, because we started about 11 in the morning, and about 11 that night we had the song done and demoed. I think he was pretty exhausted from it, and I was pretty tired, too. We ended up writing four songs, I wrote four days with him, and each day we wrote a totally different kind of song. And all four of them ended up on the record.”

This was the last single from Perry’s debut solo album, Street Talk. His group Journey was still active at the time, but members had taken on solo projects: guitarist Neal Schon teamed up with Jan Hammer (as Schon & Hammer) for albums in 1981 and 1982, and drummer Steve Smith released a jazz album in 1983 with his group Vital Information. Perry had by far the most successful career outside of Journey.

Foolish Heart
Steve Perry

I need a love that grows
I don’t want it unless I know
With each passin’ hour
Someone, somehow
Will be there, ready to share

I need a love that’s strong
I’m so tired of being alone
But will my lonely heart
Play the part
Of the fool again, before I begin

Foolish heart, hear me calling
Stop before you start falling
Foolish heart, heed my warning
You’ve been wrong before
Don’t be wrong anymore

Feelin’ that feelin’ again
Playin’ a game I can’t win
Love’s knockin’ on the door
Of my heart once more
Think I’ll let her in
Before I begin

Foolish heart, hear me calling
Stop before, you start falling
Foolish heart, heed my warning
You’ve been wrong before
Don’t be wrong anymore
Foolish heart
Foolish, foolish heart
You’ve been wrong before

Foolish heart, hear me calling
Stop before you start falling
Foolish heart, heed my warning
You’ve been wrong before
Don’t be wrong anymore
Foolish heart

Oh foolish foolish heart
You’ve been wrong before

Foolish foolish heart
Foolish heart

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Stephen Perry / Randy Goodrum
Foolish Heart lyrics © Round Hill Music Big Loud Songs, Downtown Music Publishing

♫ Nikita ♫

This one was mentioned in a conversation a day or two ago, and it’s been stuck in my head ever since.

Released in 1985, in this Cold War ballad, a Westerner falls in love with an East German citizen he cannot meet because he is not allowed to cross the Berlin Wall. This was a very revolutionary song during the Cold War; Eastern Europeans who lived in the communist block would listen to Western radio stations like Free Europe and pick up on the sentiments.

What I did not know is that George Michael sang backing vocals on this track, as well as several other Elton songs including one of my very favourites, Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me.

Elton John, Bernie Taupin and Big Pig Music were accused of plagiarism by South African photographer and songwriter Guy Hobbs. Hobbs wrote a song in 1982 entitled Natasha, about a Russian waitress on a cruise ship, who was never allowed to leave it. The song was copyrighted in 1983, and sent to Big Pig Music (John’s publisher) for a possible publishing deal, but Hobbs never heard back from the publisher. In 2001, Hobbs came across the lyric book to “Nikita” and noticed similarities with his song. Despite repeated attempts by Hobbs to contact John over the issue, he never heard from him and so commenced legal action in 2012.  On 31 October 2012, a US federal judge granted John and Taupin’s motion to dismiss, finding that the song did not infringe Hobbs’ copyright because the only similar elements were generic images and themes that are not protected under copyright law.

Nikita
Elton John

Hey Nikita is it cold
In your little corner of the world
You could roll around the globe
And never find a warmer soul to know

Oh I saw you by the wall
Ten of your tin soldiers in a row
With eyes that looked like ice on fire
The human heart a captive in the snow

Oh Nikita you will never know, anything about my home
I’ll never know how good it feels to hold you
Nikita I need you so
Oh Nikita is the other side of any given line in time
Counting ten tin soldiers in a row
Oh no, Nikita you’ll never know

Do you ever dream of me
Do you ever see the letters that I write
When you look up through the wire
Nikita do you count the stars at night

And if there comes a time
Guns and gates no longer hold you in
And if you’re free to make a choice
Just look towards the west and find a friend

Oh Nikita you will never know, anything about my home
I’ll never know how good it feels to hold you
Nikita I need you so
Oh Nikita is the other side of any given line in time
Counting ten tin soldiers in a row
Oh no, Nikita you’ll never know

Oh Nikita you will never know, anything about my home
I’ll never know how good it feels to hold you
Nikita I need you so
Oh Nikita is the other side of any given line in time
Counting ten tin soldiers in a row
Oh no, Nikita you’ll never know

Nikita counting ten tin soldiers in a row
Nikita counting ten tin soldiers in a row
Nikita counting ten tin soldiers in a row
Nikita

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Bernard J.P. Taupin / Bernie Taupin / Elton John
Nikita lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group

♫ The Living Years ♫ (Redux)

I am reduxing a song I last played in September 2018, nearly two years ago.  Why?  Because I am exhausted and too tired to dig for trivia, the best version, lyrics, etc. tonight.  Why this one?  Because I like it.

This song is written from the perspective of a son who has a conflicted relationship with his father. After his father dies, he discovers that he and his dad had a much stronger bond than he ever realized, and the son regrets not saying more while his dad was alive.

It was written by group founder Mike Rutherford and the Scottish songwriter B.A. Robertson. Both Robertson and Rutherford had recently lost their fathers when they wrote this song, making it a very personal endeavor for both of them.

The song was written in stages. B.A. Robertson wrote the first verse before his father died in 1986, the same year Rutherford lost his dad. The pair composed the music based on this verse, and then a while later Robertson came up with the second verse. The final verse didn’t come to him until shortly before the song was recorded. Robertson was staying at a hotel in Los Angeles and was under pressure to finish the lyric before flying back to Europe. He recalls going outside to a garden at the hotel when the verse came to him.

Robertson was working with Rutherford when he got the call that his dad had died, which is reflected in the opening lines of this verse:

I wasn’t there that morning
When my father passed away

Three months before his father died, Robertson’s son was born, which we hear in this line:

I’m sure I heard his echo
In my baby’s new born tears

The Living Years
Mike & The Mechanics

Every generation
Blames the one before
And all of their frustrations
Come beating on your door

I know that I’m a prisoner
To all my Father held so dear
I know that I’m a hostage
To all his hopes and fears
I just wish I could have told him in the living years

Oh, crumpled bits of paper
Filled with imperfect thought
Stilted conversations
I’m afraid that’s all we’ve got

You say you just don’t see it
He says it’s perfect sense
You just can’t get agreement
In this present tense
We all talk a different language
Talking in defence

Say it loud (say it loud), say it clear (oh say it clear)
You can listen as well as you hear
It’s too late (it’s too late) when we die (oh when we die)
To admit we don’t see eye to eye

So we open up a quarrel
Between the present and the past
We only sacrifice the future
It’s the bitterness that lasts

So don’t yield to the fortunes
You sometimes see as fate
It may have a new perspective
On a different day
And if you don’t give up, and don’t give in
You may just be okay

So say it loud, say it clear (oh say it clear)
You can listen as well as you hear
Because it’s too late, it’s too late (it’s too late) when we die (oh when we die)
To admit we don’t see eye to eye

I wasn’t there that morning
When my Father passed away
I didn’t get to tell him
All the things I had to say

I think I caught his spirit
Later that same year
I’m sure I heard his echo
In my baby’s new born tears
I just wish I could have told him in the living years

Say it loud, say it clear (oh say it clear)
You can listen as well as you hear
It’s too late (it’s too late) when we die (it’s too late when we die)
To admit we don’t see eye to eye

So say it, say it, say it loud (say it loud)
Say it clear (come on say it clear)

Songwriters: B.A. Robertson / Mike Rutherford (gb)
The Living Years lyrics © EMI Music Publishing, Concord Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management

♫ Lady ♫

Tonight’s song is one of those that just popped into my head unannounced, but it is one I’ve always liked.  I did not know until tonight that Little River Band was from Australia!  Or perhaps I did know and had forgotten … I seem to forget a lot of things lately.

Lady is a 1978 song written by Graeham Goble, and performed by Australian rock music group Little River Band. It was the second single release from their Sleeper Catcher album. The song was their second Top 10 hit in the U. S., peaking at #10.  It hit #29 in Canada, and interestingly only #46 in Australia.

Beyond that, I can find no trivia about this song, so just kick back and enjoy the music.

Lady
Little River Band

Look around you, look up here
Take time to make time
Make time to be there
Look around, be a part
Feel for the winter
But don’t have a cold heart

And I love you best
You’re not like the rest
You’re there when I need you
You’re there when I need
I’m gonna need you
A long time ago

I had a lady to love
She made me think of things
I never thought of
Now she’s gone and I’m on my own
A love song has come into my mind
A love song
It was there all the time

So lady
Let me take a look at you now
You’re there on the dance floor
Making me want you somehow
Oh lady
I think it’s only fair
I should say to you
Don’t be thinkin’ that I don’t want you
‘Cause maybe I do

Look around, come to me
I have no answers
But know where I wanna be
I look around, play a part
I was born in the winter
And cooled by a warm heart

And I love you best
You’re not like the rest
You’re there when I need you
You’re there when I need
I’m gonna need you

So lady
Let me take a look at you now
You’re there on the dance floor
Making me want you somehow
Oh lady
I think it’s only fair I should say to you
Don’t be thinkin’ that I don’t want you
‘Cause maybe I do
Don’t be thinkin’ that I don’t want you
Lady I do

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Graeham George Goble / Graham George Goble
Lady lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc