♫ Can You Feel The Love Tonight ♫

Naturally, given my love for all (or most, anyway — I never did care for Rocket Man) things Elton, I have already played Elton’s version of this song.  However, tonight I was pointed in the direction of a different version by a group called Pentatonix.

This talented diverse a cappella group is from Arlington,Texas. They are named after the Pentatonic Scale, a scale with 5 notes per octave that represents the 5 members of the group. They replaced the last letter of the word with an “x” to make it more appealing. In 2011 the third season of “The Sing-Off” with Nick Lachey as host premiered on Sept. 19th and featured Pentatonix. On November 28, 2011 the season concluded…with Pentatonix winning!

Can You Feel the Love Tonight
Pentatonix

There’s a calm surrender to the rush of day
When the heat of the rolling world can be turned away
An enchanted moment and it sees me through
It’s enough for this restless warrior just to be with you

And can you feel the love tonight? It is where we are
It’s enough for this wide-eyed wanderer that we got this far
And can you feel the love tonight? How it’s laid to rest
It’s enough to make kings and vagabonds believe the very best

There’s a time for everyone, if they only learn
That the twisting kaleidoscope moves us all in turn
There’s a rhyme and reason to the wild outdoors
When the heart of this star-crossed voyager beats in time with yours

And can you feel the love tonight? It is where we are
It’s enough for this wide-eyed wanderer that we got this far
And can you feel the love tonight? How it’s laid to rest
It’s enough to make kings and vagabonds believe the very best
It’s enough to make kings and vagabonds believe the very best

Songwriters: Elton John / Tim Rice
Can You Feel the Love Tonight lyrics © Walt Disney Music Company

♫ Blowin’ In The Wind ♫

This morning’s post was my reflection about the divisiveness in this nation, about how far apart those on the political right and left are, and whether there is any hope for a meeting in the middle, or whether we are bent on the destruction of the nation.  When you spend as much time as I do reading, observing, researching, and thinking about these things, you don’t just flip a switch and bring your head back to a happy place.  The darkness remains even long after the post has been scheduled and put to bed.  Tonight’s song is a reflection of what I see happening, what I think and feel.

This song was written by Bob Dylan who claims that he wrote it in about 10 minutes one afternoon. He put words to the melody of an old slave song called “No More Auction Block,” which he might have learned from Carter family records. In the evening, Dylan took the song to the nightclub Gerde’s Folk City in Greenwich Village, where he was due to play a set. Before playing it, he announced, “This here ain’t no protest song or anything like that, ’cause I don’t write no protest songs.” During this first performance, Dylan couldn’t read some of his own handwriting and made up some of the lyrics as he went along.

The Dylan version of this song was never a hit – it was a cover by Peter, Paul & Mary that made #2 in the US in February 1963, introducing many people to the music of Bob Dylan, who was an obscure folk singer at the time.

“There ain’t too much I can say about this song except that the answer is blowing in the wind. It ain’t in no book or movie or TV show or discussion group. Man, it’s in the wind — and it’s blowing in the wind. Too many of these hip people are telling me where the answer is but oh I won’t believe that. I still say it’s in the wind and just like a restless piece of paper it’s got to come down some … But the only trouble is that no one picks up the answer when it comes down so not too many people get to see and know … and then it flies away. I still say that some of the biggest criminals are those that turn their heads away when they see wrong and know it’s wrong. I’m only 21 years old and I know that there’s been too many … You people over 21, you’re older and smarter.”

One line, the one in bold typeface, says so much about our troubles today.

As I like both the Bob Dylan and the Peter, Paul and Mary versions, I present you with both for your listening pleasure.

Blowin’ in the Wind
Bob Dylan

How many roads must a man walk down
Before you call him a man?
How many seas must a white dove sail
Before she sleeps in the sand?
Yes, ‘n’ how many times must the cannon balls fly
Before they’re forever banned?
The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind
The answer is blowin’ in the wind

Yes, ‘n’ how many years can a mountain exist
Before it’s washed to the sea?
Yes, ‘n’ how many years can some people exist
Before they’re allowed to be free?
Yes, ‘n’ how many times can a man turn his head
And pretend that he just doesn’t see?
The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind
The answer is blowin’ in the wind

Yes, ‘n’ how many times must a man look up
Before he can see the sky?
Yes, ‘n’ how many ears must one man have
Before he can hear people cry?
Yes, ‘n’ how many deaths will it take till he knows
That too many people have died?
The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind
The answer is blowin’ in the wind

Songwriters: Bob Dylan
Blowin’ in the Wind lyrics © Audiam, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group

♫ Moon River ♫

Some songs, I think, are simply timeless … or perhaps it is just that I am old and nostalgia has taken hold of my mind today.  I’ve been in a dark place of late … I see too much wrong in the world and realize that my small contributions toward righting the wrongs are pretty irrelevant.  So, tonight I went searching for a song that would take me back to another time … not necessarily a simpler or better time … just a different time.

This was used as Audrey Hepburn’s theme song in the 1961 movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Hepburn sings the song in the movie, and many have recorded this, including Andy Williams and Frank Sinatra, but the one that made the charts in 1961 was Jerry Butler’s version.  Butler’s version reached #11 in the U.S. and #14 in Canada, but it was South African singer Danny Williams’ version that topped the charts at #1 in the UK.  I listened to Danny Williams’ version and frankly, I liked it better than the rest!  I had never heard of him before, but his voice is as silk.

Henry Mancini wrote this song with lyricist Johnny Mercer. The original title was “Blue River,” but Mercer found out another songwriter was using that title.  Moon River is a real river in Savannah, Georgia, where Mercer grew up. His home overlooked the river and he had fond memories of the place. At the time, the river was known as The Back River, but was renamed Moon River in honor of the song, and Johnny Mercer’s home along the river became known as the Moon River House.  According to Mancini …

“I reckon I’ll have made around $100,000 on ‘Moon River’ within the next two years or so. It took me about 30 minutes to compose. It had to be in keeping with the character of Holly Golightly, the star of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and I had to bear in mind the limitations of Audrey Hepburn’s voice. I worked the whole song round a simple guitar basis, although the guitar isn’t heard much during the number.”

Danny Williams originally refused to sing it, saying that Johnny Mercer’s lyrics were nonsensical. But he saw the film and was so moved by it that he relented. Williams died of cancer on 6th December 2005.

With so many good versions to choose from, I was torn.  So, I am giving you a choice tonight, between Jerry Butler’s, Andy Williams’, and Danny Williams’.  Listen to one, to all, or to none … let me know what you think.

Moon River

Moon river, wider than a mile
I’m crossing you in style some day
Oh, dream maker, you heart breaker
Wherever you’re goin’, I’m goin’ your way

Two drifters, off to see the world
There’s such a lot of world to see
We’re after the same rainbow’s end, waitin’ ’round the bend
My huckleberry friend, moon river, and me

Moon river, wider than a mile
I’m crossin’ you in style some day
Oh, dream maker, you heart breaker
Wherever you’re goin’, I’m goin’ your way

Two drifters, off to see the world
There’s such a lot of world to see
We’re after that same rainbow’s end, waitin’ ’round the Bend
My huckleberry friend, moon river, and me

Writer/s: Johnny Mercer, Henry Mancini
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

♫ Walk Don’t Run ♫

Tonight, as I was trolling around my usual haunts for material for Jolly Monday, I came across a list on Phil’s Phun of the top songs of the 1960s.  Immediately, I seized on at least 15 great ones that I hadn’t thought of in ages, such as Jimmy Jones’ Handy Man, Brenda Lee’s I’m Sorry, Greenfields by The Brothers Four, and much more that brought back memories galore.  But, when I came to #25 on the list … damn, but I’ve always loved this song!  It’s an instrumental, no words, but it needs none.

After hearing a Chet Atkins recording of Walk Don’t Run, the Tacoma-based instrumental rock band The Ventures released their version of the tune as a single in spring 1960 on Dolton Records. This version made the Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at #2 and was kept out of the #1 spot by It’s Now or Never by Elvis Presley.

This single, their first national release, vaulted the Ventures’ career. The song was recorded before the band officially had a drummer. The Ventures’ website lists the drummer on Walk, Don’t Run as Skip Moore. Skip was given the choice of $25 or 25% of the money the record would make for playing on the session. He took the $25.  Fool!

Lyrics???  It’s an instrumental …

♫ Love | Song Around The World ♫

For a number of reasons, I have not had a song in my heart for several days.  That was likely to continue until … our friend Ellen, knowing of my frame of mind, sent me a song today with the message …

“I think that you need to take a few moments to listen to this song …”

Listen I did, smile I did, and this song I wish to share with you all today.

The song encompasses musicians from ’round the world, and the message is, quite simply, “We are all the same”.  It is in the same vein as We Are The World, and Coca Cola’s, I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing, a message of inclusion, of humanity … of love.

Among the musicians are …

Kim Churchill, Newcastle, Australia

Taimane, Waikiki, Hawaii

Tal Ben Ari “Tula”, Tel Aviv, Israel

Olodum, Salvador, State of Bahia, Brazil

Sophia Scott, Boulder, Colorado, USA

William Barton, Mount Isa QLD, Australia

Mana Maoli Collective Youth, O‘ahu, Hawaii, USA

Jose Ikotela, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Tushar Lall, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Glodi Dinga, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Rupak Dhamankar, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Vanraj Shastri,  Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

Prasad Rahane,  Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Paco Soto,  Aguilas, Murcia, Spain

Love

Playing for Change

It’s been a long time coming, coming
Seeming like we all been running, running
Feeling like the wild west, gunning, gunning
Listen to our elders shunning, shunning
Flipping on the news, be talking, talking
All about the problems, shocking, shocking
We put on our headphones walking, walking
We put on our headphones
Where did we all go wrong?
Love, love, love, love
Lo-lo-lo-love, love, love
Lo-lo-lo-love, love, love
Where did we all, where did we all go wrong?
(Lo-lo-lo-love, love, love)
All I see is faces, color, color
All the other races, other, other
Why couldn’t you just be my brother, brother?
We don’t have to kill one another, kill one another
All around the world, we are one, we are one
All around the world, we are one
Where did we all go wrong?
Love, love, love, love
Lo-lo-lo-love, love, love
Lo-lo-lo-love, love, love
Where did we all, where did we all go wrong?
(Lo-lo-lo-love, love, love)
Yeah we got the same blood, blood
We got the same blood, blood
Will it be enough, ‘nough?
Will it be enough?
We got the same heartbeat
We’re living for the same dream
We got the same bloodstream
Where did we all go wrong?
Looooooooove….

♫ Just When I Needed You Most ♫

A bit of angst tonight, worried about a friend, and so my mind is somewhat jumbled … yeah, yeah, I know … when isn’t my mind jumbled, right?  So anyway, I was in the shower a bit ago, around 1:00 a.m., and I found myself literally belting this one out … which, I am hoping didn’t wake my daughter, who has to get up at 5:00 a.m. to go to work!

Randy VanWarmer wrote this when he was just 18, after being dumped by a girl.

VanWarmer was living in England when he wrote this song. About five years later, he landed a record and publishing deal with Albert Grossman’s Bearsville Records and moved to Woodstock, New York, where the label was located, to record his first album. The first song he recorded there was Your Light, with Just When I Needed You Most as the B-side. Bearsville saw a lot more hit potential in Just When I Needed You Most, so they made that the A-side. It was a good choice: the song went to #4 on the Hot 100 and #1 on the Adult Contemporary chart.

VanWarmer died in 2004 at age 48 after a battle with leukemia.

Just When I Needed You Most
Randy VanWarmer

You packed in the morning, I stared out the window
And I struggled for something to say
You left in the rain without closing the door
I didn’t stand in your way

But I miss you more than I missed you before
And now where I’ll find comfort, god knows
‘Cause you left me just when I needed you most
Left me just when I needed you most

Now most every morning, I stare out the window
And I think about where you might be
I’ve written you letters that I’d like to send
If you would just send one to me

‘Cause I need you more than I needed before
And now where I’ll find comfort, God knows
‘Cause you left me just when I needed you most
Left me just when I needed you most

You packed in the morning, I stared out the window
And I struggled for something to say
You left in the rain without closing the door
I didn’t stand in your way

Now I love you more than I loved you before
And now where I’ll find comfort, God knows
‘Cause you left me just when I needed you most
Oh yeah, you left me just when I needed you most
You left me just when I needed you most

Songwriters: Randy Van Warmer
Just When I Needed You Most lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc

♫ Woman ♫

My original intent was to play the song by the same name by Peter and Gordon, but when I Googled, this one by John Lennon came up before the Peter and Gordon one, and after listening to both, I decided to play this one, which I like much better, even though it was the other that was rattling about in my head as I vacuumed floors earlier today.  It turns out, and this I did not know, that Paul McCartney wrote the Peter and Gordon song!  Small world, eh?

Lennon wrote this song as an ode to his wife Yoko Ono.  Speaking with Rolling Stone just days before his death, Lennon said …

Woman came about because, one sunny afternoon in Bermuda, it suddenly hit me what women do for us. Not just what my Yoko does for me, although I was thinking in those personal terms… but any truth is universal. What dawned on me was everything I was taking for granted. Women really are the other half of the sky, as I whisper at the beginning of the song. It’s a ‘we’ or it ain’t anything.”

In many ways, this song is Lennon’s apology to Yoko. In 1973, the couple was having problems in their marriage, so Yoko agreed to put their relationship on hold and let John sow his oats (she’s more tolerant than I, methinks). He did, taking up with his assistant May Pang and engaging in some unruly behavior. Lennon referred to this time as his “Lost Weekend” – it lasted about 18 months.

This was released as a single in January 1981, about a month after Lennon was murdered.

Woman
John Lennon

Woman
I can hardly express
My mixed emotions at my thoughtlessness
After all, I’m forever in your debt
And woman
I will try to express
My inner feeling and thankfulness
For showing me the meaning of success

Ooh, well, well
Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo
Ooh, well, well
Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo

Woman
I know you understand
The little child inside the man
Please remember my life is in your hands

And woman
Hold me close to your heart
However distant, don’t keep us apart
After all it is written in the stars

Ooh, well, well
Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo
Ooh, well, well
Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo

Well, woman
Please let me explain
I never meant to cause you sorrow or pain
So let me tell you again and again and again

I love you, yeah, yeah
Now and forever
I love you, yeah, yeah
Now and forever
I love you, yeah, yeah
Now and forever
I love you, yeah, yeah

Songwriters: John Lennon
Woman lyrics © Downtown Music Publishing

♫ Night Fever ♫

I usually don’t struggle to find my “song of the day”, but tonight, for some reason, I just couldn’t come up with anything that I hadn’t already played.  Probably because I just finished my “mini-rants” post and the remnants of angst are still pinging around in my head.  Anyway, I threw out some random ideas, then hit upon this one by the Bee Gees.

In 1977, The Bee Gees manager Robert Stigwood was producing a movie about the New York disco scene. The working title of the film was “Saturday Night,” so he asked the group to write a song of that name. The Bee Gees thought it was a dumb title, but they had already written a song called “Night Fever.” They convinced Stigwood to use that and change the film’s title to Saturday Night Fever. The movie became a classic, telling a coming-of-age story in the disco era. It helped launch the film career of John Travolta, who starred as Tony Manero, the conflicted youth who escaped his troubles on the dance floor.

The soundtrack for Saturday Night Fever sold over 30 million copies worldwide and won the 1978 Grammy for Album Of The Year. This was the third single from the soundtrack and its biggest hit, remaining on the top of the Hot 100 for eight weeks in early 1978. It also topped the British singles chart for two weeks and won a 1978 Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance By A Group.  According to Robin Gibb …

“The idea for the film that became Saturday Night Fever started when our manager, Robert Stigwood, saw an article in New York magazine entitled ‘Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night’ by Nik Cohn, talking about teenagers going to dancing competitions. When they first started dance rehearsals for the film with John Travolta, they were using our song ‘You Should Be Dancing,’ which had been released the previous year. We were mixing a live album in France and Robert rang and asked if we had any other songs we could contribute. In the end we had five new tracks – ‘Staying Alive,’ ‘How Deep is Your Love?’ ‘Night Fever,’ ‘More Than a Woman’ and ‘If I Can’t Have You’ (recorded by Yvonne Elliman) – plus the previously released ‘Jive Talkin” and ‘You Should Be Dancing.’ It was also our idea to call it Saturday Night Fever, because the competitions were on Saturday and we already had the track ‘Night Fever.’

Until the film came out, ‘disco’ meant something very different in the UK to the US. We were writing what we considered to be blue-eyed soul. We never set out to make ourselves the kings of disco, although plenty of other people tried to jump on the bandwagon after the success of the film. When we went to the premiere at the Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles it was obvious the film and the songs really gelled, but none of us had any idea how huge it would become. It remains the biggest-selling soundtrack ever, and very few artists have created something with the cultural impact that Saturday Night Fever had.”

Night Fever
Bee Gees

Listen to the ground
There is movement all around
There is something goin’ down
And I can feel it

On the waves of the air
There is dancin’ out there
If it’s somethin’ we can share
We can steal it

And that sweet city woman
She moves through the light
Controlling my mind and my soul
When you reach out for me
Yeah, and the feelin’ is right

Then I get night fever, night fever
We know how to do it
Gimme that night fever, night fever
We know how to show it

Here I am
Prayin’ for this moment to last
Livin’ on the music so fine
Borne on the wind
Makin’ it mine

Night fever, night fever
We know how to do it
Gimme that night fever, night fever
We know how to show it

In the heat of our love
Don’t need no help for us to make it
Gimme just enough to take us to the mornin’
I got fire in my mind
I get higher in my walkin’
And I’m glowin’ in the dark
I give you warnin’

And that sweet city woman
She moves through the night
Controlling my mind and my soul
When you reach out for me
Yeah, and the feelin’ is right

Then I get night fever, night fever
We know how to do it
Gimme that night fever, night fever
We know how to show it

Here I am
Prayin’ for this moment to last
Livin’ on the music so fine
Borne on the wind
Makin’ it mine

Night fever, night fever
We know how to do it
Gimme that night fever, night fever
We know how to show it

Gimme that night fever, night fever
We know how to do it
Gimme that night fever, night fever
We know how to show it
Gimme that night fever, night fever
We know how to do it

Songwriters: Robin Hugh Gibb / Maurice Ernest Gibb / Barry Gibb / Barry Alan Gibb / Maurice Gibb / Robin Gibb
Night Fever lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group

♫ Mr. Tambourine Man ♫

I had a song in my head all day today.  It wasn’t this one, but was Turn, Turn, Turn, also by the Byrds.  I opted for this one instead, for a couple of reasons that … I shan’t disclose!  I have to keep a few secrets tucked away, right?  Anyway … when I went digging for information about this song, my jaw dropped.  Even my daughter, who is a musical guru, did not know who wrote and first recorded this song.  Do you?  I’m betting that Keith and Scott both know that Bob Dylan wrote this song and recorded it on his fifth album Bringing It All Back Home on March 22, 1965.  But it was the Byrds cover, released later in 1965, that brought the song to the #1 spot, and is the only song Dylan ever wrote that went to #1 in the U.S.

Dylan wrote this on a road trip he took with some friends from New York to San Francisco. They smoked lots of marijuana along the way, replenishing their stash at post offices where they had mailed pot along the way.

The Byrds’ version is based on Bob Dylan’s demo of the song that he recorded during sessions for his 1964 album Another Side of Bob Dylan. It was The Byrds’ manager Jim Dickson who brought in the demo and asked them to record it – the group refused at first because they thought it didn’t have any hit potential. When The Byrds did record it, they took some lyrics out and added a 12-string guitar lead.

Only three of the five members of the Byrds performed on this song: Roger McGuinn sang lead and played lead guitar; Gene Clark and David Crosby did the vocal harmonies. Session musicians were brought in to play the other instruments, since the band was just starting out and wasn’t deemed good enough yet by their management.

This was the Byrds’ first single.  According to Roger McGuinn …

“To get that sound, that hit sound, that ‘Mr. Tambourine Man’ sound, we just ran it through the electronics which were available to us at that time, which were mainly compression devices and tape delay, tape-sustain. That’s how we got it, by equalizing it properly and aiming at a specific frequency.

For stereo-buffs out there who noticed that ‘Mr. Tambourine Man’ in stereo isn’t really stereo, by the way, that’s because when Terry Melcher, the producer, first started mixing records he didn’t know how to mix stereo, and so he made all the singles up to ‘Turn Turn Turn’ mono. The label is misrepresentative. See, when Columbia Records signed us, they didn’t know what they had. So they gave production to someone low on the totem-pole-which was Terry Melcher who was Doris Day’s son who was getting a token-job-in-the-mailroom sort of thing. They gave him the Byrds and the Byrds were supposed to flunk the test.”

I was only planning to play the Byrds’ version here, but when I saw the one of Dylan playing guitar and harmonica plus singing, I just had to include it, too.

Mr. Tambourine Man
Song by The Byrds

Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there ain’t no place I’m goin’ to
Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning, I’ll come followin’ you

Take me for a trip upon your magic swirlin’ ship
All my senses have been stripped
And my hands can’t feel to grip
And my toes too numb to step
Wait only for my boot heels to be wanderin’

I’m ready to go anywhere I’m ready for to fade
On to my own parade cast your dancin’ spell my way
I promise to go under it

Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there ain’t no place I’m goin’ to
Hey Mister Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning, I’ll come followin’ you

Songwriters: Bob Dylan
Mr. Tambourine Man lyrics © Audiam, Inc

♫ I Will Survive ♫

This song has become known as a “female empowerment” song, and most often it is associated with the break-up of two lovers.  But …

Dino Fekaris, the song’s lyricist, was a staff writer for Motown until he was fired.  Says Fekaris, of the inspiration for this song …

“They let me go after almost seven years. I was an unemployed songwriter contemplating my fate. I turned the TV on, and there it was: a song I had written for a movie theme titled Generation was playing right then (the song was performed by Rare Earth). I took that as an omen that things were going to work out for me. I remember jumping up and down on the bed saying, ‘I’m going to make it. I’m going to be a songwriter. I will survive!”

Freddie Perren was another former Motown songwriter, and he & Fekaris paired up on this song, and went on to form their own production duo and scored big with Peaches & Herb, taking Reunited to #1.

Gaynor sees this song as just a simple song about survival, regardless of what you have to overcome.

“I love the empowering effect, I love the encouraging effect. It’s a timeless lyric that addresses a timeless concern.”

I Will Survive
Gloria Gaynor

At first I was afraid, I was petrified
Kept thinking I could never live without you by my side
But then I spent so many nights thinking how you did me wrong
And I grew strong
And I learned how to get along
And so you’re back
From outer space
I just walked in to find you here with that sad look upon your face
I should have changed that stupid lock, I should have made you leave your key
If I’d known for just one second you’d be back to bother me
Go on now, go, walk out the door
Just turn around now
‘Cause you’re not welcome anymore
Weren’t you the one who tried to hurt me with goodbye
Do you think I’d crumble
Did you think I’d lay down and die?

Oh no, not I, I will survive
Oh, as long as I know how to love, I know I’ll stay alive
I’ve got all my life to live
And I’ve got all my love to give and I’ll survive
I will survive, hey, hey

It took all the strength I had not to fall apart
Kept trying hard to mend the pieces of my broken heart
And I spent oh-so many nights just feeling sorry for myself
I used to cry
But now I hold my head up high and you see me
Somebody new
I’m not that chained-up little person and still in love with you
And so you felt like dropping in and just expect me to be free
Well, now I’m saving all my lovin’ for someone who’s loving me
Go on now, go, walk out the door
Just turn around now
‘Cause you’re not welcome anymore
Weren’t you the one who tried to break me with goodbye
Do you think I’d crumble
Did you think I’d lay down and die?

Oh no, not I, I will survive
Oh, as long as I know how to love, I know I’ll stay alive
I’ve got all my life to live
And I’ve got all my love to give and I’ll survive
I will survive

Oh
Go on now, go, walk out the door
Just turn around now
‘Cause you’re not welcome anymore
Weren’t you the one who tried to break me with goodbye
Do you think I’d crumble
Did you think I’d lay down and die?

Oh no, not I, I will survive
Oh, as long as I know how to love, I know I’ll stay alive
I’ve got all my life to live
And I’ve got all my love to give and I’ll survive
I will survive
I will survive

Songwriters: Dino Fekaris / Frederick J. Perren
I Will Survive lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group