♫ Monday, Monday ♫

I thought this one appropriate for the day …

While awaiting the release of California Dreamin’, band member Denny Doherty was prodding songwriter John Phillips to come up with some new material. Phillips said he would come back in the morning with “A song with universal appeal.”  Monday, Monday was that song, which Phillips said took him all of about 20 minutes to write.

Interestingly, Doherty, who sang lead on this song for The Mamas & the Papas thought very little of Monday Monday when they recorded it.

“Nobody likes Monday, so I thought it was just a song about the working man. Nothing about it stood out to me; it was a dumb f–kin’ song about a day of the week.”

As you can imagine, he was taken by surprise when the song became a huge hit. Doherty wasn’t alone in his incredulity: Mama Cass and Michelle Phillips didn’t like the song either, and John Phillips claimed he had no idea what the song meant.

The Mamas & the Papas used top-tier Los Angeles studio musicians on their recordings. On this track, Larry Knechtel played keyboards, Joe Osborn played bass, Hal Blaine was on drums and P.F. Sloan played guitar. Sloan was the baby of the bunch, just 20 years old when the song was released in 1966.

On March 2, 1967, the Mamas & the Papas won a Grammy Award for this song, in the category Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.  The song was performed at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967. The performance was filmed for the movie of the festival, but not included in the final print.

The song charted at #1 in Canada and the U.S., #3 in the UK

Monday, Monday
The Mamas & the Papas

Bah da bah da da da
Bah da bah da da da
Bah da bah da da da

Monday, Monday, so good to me
Monday mornin’, it was all I hoped it would be
Oh Monday mornin’, Monday mornin’ couldn’t guarantee
That Monday evenin’ you would still be here with me

Monday, Monday, can’t trust that day
Monday, Monday, sometimes it just turns out that way
Oh Monday mornin’ you gave me no warnin’ of what was to be
Oh Monday, Monday, how could you leave and not take me

Every other day, every other day
Every other day of the week is fine, yeah
But whenever Monday comes, but whenever Monday comes
A you can find me cryin’ all of the time

Monday, Monday, so good to me
Monday mornin’, it was all I hoped it would be
But Monday mornin’, Monday mornin’ couldn’t guarantee
That Monday evenin’ you would still be here with me

Every other day, every other day
Every other day of the week is fine, yeah
But whenever Monday comes, but whenever Monday comes
A you can find me cryin’ all of the time

Monday, Monday, can’t trust that day
Monday, Monday, it just turns out that way
Oh Monday, Monday, won’t go away
Monday, Monday, it’s here to stay
Oh Monday, Monday
Oh Monday, Monday

Writer/s: JOHN EDMUND ANDREW PHILLIPS
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

♫ Come And Get It ♫

Tonight’s music post is brought to you thanks to blogging friend Michael Seidel!  I was drawing a blank and, being tired and somewhat cranky, was about to give up when I popped into Michael’s place where he was playing this song!  Thanks Michael!

Paul McCartney wrote this for the 1969 movie The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr.  McCartney recorded the demo of this, and he played all the instruments himself. This was done prior to a Beatles recording session at Abbey Road studios. Paul’s demo sounds exactly like Badfinger’s recording, which he produced. In The Beatles Anthology book, Paul mentions that Badfinger wanted to do the song more in their own style, but he insisted they do it the same as on his demo. He told them that he knew this would be a hit song as long as they played it just as he had.  And it was a hit, reaching #4 in the UK and Canada, and #7 in the U.S.

This was Badfinger’s first hit single. They were the first group to sign with Apple Records, which is The Beatles’ label.  The band’s future wasn’t too rosy, though.  Badfinger had a few other hits in the early ’70s, but in 1974 Warner Brothers Records, which signed them when Apple folded, sued the band and kept them from recording. One member of the group, Pete Ham, killed himself a year later, and another, Tom Evans, committed suicide in 1983.

Come And Get It
Badfinger

If you want it, here it is, come and get it
Mm mm mm mm, make your mind up fast
If you want it, any time, I can give it

But you’d better hurry ’cause it may not last
Did I hear you say that there must be a catch?
Will you walk away from a fool and his money?

If you want it, here it is, come and get it
But you’d better hurry ’cause it’s goin’ fast
If you want it, here it is, come and get it
Mm mm mm mm, make your mind up fast

If you want it, any time, I can give it
But you’d better hurry ’cause it may not last

Did I hear you say that there must be a catch?
Will you walk away from a fool and his money?
Sonny!

If you want it, here it is, come and get it
But you’d better hurry ’cause it’s goin’ fast
You’d better hurry ’cause it’s goin’ fast

Ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh
Fool and his money
Sonny!

If you want it, here it is, come and get it
But you’d better hurry ’cause it’s goin’ fast
You’d better hurry ’cause it’s goin’ fast
You’d better hurry ’cause it’s goin’ fast.

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Paul James Mccartney
Come And Get It – Re-Recording lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

♫ Glory Of Love ♫

Every song that popped into my head tonight, I’ve already played, some as recently as last week, though I had already forgotten (senility???).  So, I just sat back and relaxed, let the ‘net take me where it would, and it landed me squarely in the midst of Peter Cetera’s lovely voice.

Released in 1986, this was Peter Cetera’s first solo single after leaving Chicago the previous year. The theme song for the film The Karate Kid: Part II, it fit the movie perfectly. The song quickly became a favorite at weddings and proms across America.

This song was written by Peter Cetera, his ex-wife Diane Nini, and David Foster, who produced Chicago’s highly successful albums Chicago 16 (1982) and Chicago 17 (1984) when Cetera was with the group. Cetera was asked by a friend to write the love song for the Karate Kid: Part II’ film, and was shown part of the movie. He has claimed that the song was destined to be a hit whether it was used for the film or not.

The song peaked at #1 in the U.S., #3 in the UK, and the Canadians apparently didn’t much like it, for it didn’t chart there.

Glory of Love
Peter Cetera

Tonight it’s very clear as we’re both lyin’ here
There’s so many things I want to say
I will always love you
I would never leave you alone

Sometimes I just forget, say things I might regret
It breaks my heart to see you cryin’
I don’t want to lose you
I could never make it alone

I am a man who will fight for your honor
I’ll be the hero you’re dreamin’ of
We’ll live forever, knowin’ together
That we did it all for the glory of love

You keep me standing tall, you help me through it all
I’m always strong when you’re beside me
I have always needed you
I could never make it alone

I am a man who will fight for your honor
I’ll be the hero you’ve been dreamin’ of
We’ll live forever, knowin’ together
That we did it all for the glory of love

It’s like a knight in shining armor from a long time ago
Just in time I will save the day
Take you to my castle far away

I am a man who will fight for your honor
I’ll be the hero that you’re dreamin’ of
We’re gonna live forever, knowin’ together
That we did it all for the glory of love

We’ll live forever, knowin’ together
That we did it all for the glory of love

We did it all for love
We did it all for love
We did it all for love
We did it all for love

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: David Foster / Peter Cetera / Diane Nini
Glory of Love lyrics © Peermusic Publishing, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group

♫ The Boxer ♫

In the two years I’ve been doing these music posts, I’ve only played three by Simon & Garfunkel, so it’s about time for another, don’t you think?

Released in 1969, this song hit #1 in Canada, #6 in the UK, and #7 in the U.S.

In a 1984 interview, Paul Simon said that he wrote this song when critics were writing harsh things about his music – he was the boxer. Said Simon …

“I think the song was about me: everybody’s beating me up, and I’m telling you now I’m going to go away if you don’t stop. By that time we had encountered our first criticism. For the first few years, it was just pure praise. It took two or three years for people to realize that we weren’t strange creatures that emerged from England but just two guys from Queens who used to sing rock’n’roll. And maybe we weren’t real folkies at all! Maybe we weren’t even hippies!” 

This song took over 100 hours to record, with parts of it done at Columbia Records studios in both Nashville and New York City. The chorus vocals were recorded in a church: St. Paul’s Chapel at Columbia University in New York. The church had a tiled dome that provided great acoustics.

Sometimes what is put in as a placeholder lyric becomes a crucial part of the song. That was the case here, as Simon used “Lie la lie” in place of a proper chorus because he couldn’t find the right words.

“I thought that ‘lie la lie was a failure of songwriting. I didn’t have any words! Then people said it was ‘lie’ but I didn’t really mean that. That it was a lie. But, it’s not a failure of songwriting, because people like that and they put enough meaning into it, and the rest of the song has enough power and emotion, I guess, to make it go, so it’s all right. But for me, every time I sing that part, I’m a little embarrassed.”

During a New York City concert in October 2010, Paul Simon stopped singing midway through The Boxer to tell the story of a woman who stopped him on the street to tell him that she edits the song when singing it to her young child. Simon told the audience that she removed the words “the whores” and altered the song to say, “I get no offers, just a come-on from toy stores on Seventh Avenue.” Simon laughingly commented that he felt that it was “a better line.”

box of tissuesOn 3 June 2016 at his concert in Berkeley, California, Paul Simon again stopped singing partway through The Boxer, this time to announce in one sentence breaking news: “I’m sorry to tell you this in this way, but Muhammad Ali passed away.” He then finished the song with the last verse modified as: “In the clearing stands a boxer and a fighter by his trade…”  

 

The Boxer
Simon & Garfunkel

I am just a poor boy
Though my story’s seldom told
I have squandered my resistance
For a pocket full of mumbles, such are promises
All lies and jests
Still a man hears what he wants to hear
And disregards the rest

When I left my home and my family
I was no more than a boy
In the company of strangers
In the quiet of the railway station
Running scared,
Laying low, seeking out the poorer quarters
Where the ragged people go
Looking for the places
Only they would know

Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie

Asking only workman’s wages
I come looking for a job
But I get no offers
Just a come-on from the whores
On Seventh Avenue
I do declare
There were times when I was so lonesome
I took some comfort there, le le le le le le le

Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie

Then I’m laying out my winter clothes
And wishing I was gone
Going home
Where the New York City winters
Aren’t bleeding me
Leading me
Going home

In the clearing stands a boxer
And a fighter by his trade
And he carries the reminders
Of ev’ry glove that laid him down
Or cut him till he cried out
In his anger and his shame
“I am leaving, I am leaving”
But the fighter still remains, mmm mmm

Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie
Lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Paul Simon
The Boxer lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, Warner Chappell Music Inc

 

♫ Light My Fire ♫

Last night I played a song by the Animals, thinking that our friend rawgod had asked for an Animals song.  While he appreciated the song, as the Animals are his favourite, he informed me that what he had asked for was a song by The Doors.  🤦  So, let me try this again!  He suggested this one, and it is one of the few songs by The Doors that I like, although my preference is José Feliciano’s version, I am only adding a bit of trivia and otherwise reduxing the song, which I played almost exactly a year ago!


I like Latin music … not all of it, but some.  Tonight’s song was originally released by the American rock band the Doors in 1967, and saw success in both the U.S. and the U.K.  But the following year, it was released by one of my favourite Latin musicians from Puerto Rico, José Feliciano.  Now, I prefer José’s version, but I’m sure many of you remember the one by the Doors best, so I will include both for your listening pleasure.

Most of the song was written by Doors guitarist Robby Krieger, who wanted to write about one of the elements: fire, air, earth, and water …

“I was living with my parents in Pacific Palisades – I had my amp and SG. I asked Jim [Morrison], what should I write about? He said, ‘Something universal, which won’t disappear two years from now. Something that people can interpret themselves.’ I said to myself I’d write about the four elements; earth, air, fire, water, I picked fire, as I loved the Stones song, ‘Play With Fire,’ and that’s how that came about.”

This became The Doors’ signature song. Included on their first album, it was a huge hit and launched them to stardom. Before it was released, The Doors were an underground band popular in the Los Angeles area, but Light My Fire got the attention of a mass audience.

Jim Morrison indicated in his notebooks that he disliked this song and hated performing it. He also seemed to resent that the popularity of the band derived from this song, which he had just a small part in writing.  In 1968, Buick offered The Doors $75,000 to use this song in a commercial as “Come on Buick, light my fire.” With Morrison away, Krieger, Densmore, and Manzarek agreed to allow it. When Morrison found out, he pitched a fit and killed the deal.

This was the last song Jim Morrison performed live. It took place at the Doors concert at The Warehouse in New Orleans on December 12, 1970. Mid-way through the song, Morrison became exasperated and smashed his microphone into the floor, ending the show.  He died in July of the following year.  The Doors’ final performance took place at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles on September 10, 1972.

An additional bit of trivia about the song that I learned last time I played it is that this song got the Doors permanently banned from the Ed Sullivan show on 17 September 1967!  According to the official Ed Sullivan Show website, rehearsals for the show went well, and with 15 minutes to air time, Sullivan went to see the band in their dressing room, telling them, “You boys look great, [but] you ought to smile a little more.” Shortly after, a producer from the show came by to inform the band that they needed to change the line “Girl, we couldn’t get much higher” to “Girl, we couldn’t get much better” when performing Light My Fire, ostensibly because the line might be construed as referring to drugs. 

Band members have given varying accounts of whether they ever agreed to change the line or not, but there’s no denying what happened live on the air. After a strong, but unremarkable performance of “People Are Strange,” the band launched into “Light My Fire,” and as the video shows, Jim Morrison sang the original lyric instead of making the suggested change.

After the show, producers said they had hoped to book them six more times, but had decided instead to ban the Doors from the show in the future. Morrison reportedly replied, “Hey, man, we just did the Sullivan show.”

José Feliciano, blind from birth, is a Puerto Rican singer and composer, best known for this song, and his Christmas song, Feliz Navidad.  Robby Krieger said in an interview about the cover: “It’s really a great feeling to have written a classic. I think I owe a big debt to Jose Feliciano because he is actually the one, when he did it, everybody started doing it. He did a whole different arrangement on it.”  I like that, when a musician shares credit when it is deserved.

And so … without further ado … I leave you to choose your version.

Light My Fire
The Doors / José Feliciano

You know that it would be untrue
You know that I would be a liar
If I was to say to you
Girl, we couldn’t get much higher

Come on baby, light my fire
Come on baby, light my fire
Try to set the night on fire

The time to hesitate is through
No time to wallow in the mire
Try now we can only lose
And our love become a funeral pyre

Come on baby, light my fire
Come on baby, light my fire
Try to set the night on fire, yeah

The time to hesitate is through
No time to wallow in the mire
Try now we can only lose
And our love become a funeral pyre

Come on baby, light my fire
Come on baby, light my fire
Try to set the night on fire, yeah

You know that it would be untrue
You know that I would be a liar
If I was to say to you
Girl, we couldn’t get much higher

Come on baby, light my fire
Come on baby, light my fire
Try to set the night on fire
Try to set the night on fire
Try to set the night on fire
Try to set the night on fire

Produced by Paul A. Rothchild

♫ We Gotta Get Out Of This Place ♫

A few days ago, our friend rawgod mentioned that he was in the mood for some of the Animals earlier music, and I kept getting sidetracked, so I hadn’t as yet played one for him.  Of course, the first to come to mind was their iconic House of the Rising Sun, but I had already played that one.  Then I thought of Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood, which perfectly suits rawgod, but alas, I had already played that one, too!  Both are worthy of a redux, but I wanted to do something new, so my next favourite is this one, We Gotta Get Outta This Place.

This was written by the husband and wife songwriting team of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil.  Mann and Weil wrote and recorded the song as a demo, with Mann singing and playing piano. It was intended for The Righteous Brothers, for whom they had written the number one hit You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ but then Mann gained a recording contract for himself, and his label Red Bird Records wanted him to release it instead. Meanwhile, record executive Allen Klein had heard it and gave the demo to Mickie Most, the Animals’ producer. Most already had a call out to Brill Building songwriters for material for the group’s next recording session and the Animals recorded it before Mann could.

The arrangement featured a distinctive bass lead by group member Chas Chandler. This was the first single not to be recorded by the original line-up, following as it did the departure of keyboard player Alan Price and his replacement by Dave Rowberry. It featured one of singer Eric Burdon’s typically raw, fierce vocals. Rolling Stone described the overall effect as a “harsh white-blues treatment from The Animals. As Burdon put it, ‘Whatever suited our attitude, we just bent to our own shape.'”

The song reached #2 on the UK pop singles chart on August 14, 1965 (held out of the top slot by the Beatles’ Help!). The following month, it reached #13 on the U.S. pop singles chart, its highest placement there. In Canada, the song also reached #2, on September 20, 1965.

At the time, the song was understandably very popular with United States Armed Forces members stationed in South Vietnam during the Vietnam War.

We Gotta Get out of This Place
The Animals

In this dirty old part of the city
Where the sun refused to shine
People tell me there ain’t no use in tryin’

Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know

Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
Oh yes I know it

(Yeah!) He’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every night and day
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)

We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
’cause girl, there’s a better life for me and you

Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true, yeah
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know it

Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey, yeah
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
I know he’s been workin’ so hard

(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every day baby
(Yeah!) Whoa!
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)

We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Somewhere baby, somehow I know it

We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Believe me baby
I know it baby
You know it too

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Barry Mann / Cynthia Weil
We Gotta Get out of This Place lyrics © EMI Music Publishing

♫ Holding Back The Years ♫

Another redux tonight … sorry, folks, but I promised this one a few nights ago and am just now getting to it, for I kept getting sidetracked with other songs, like last night’s Baker Street. 


I was chatting with a dear friend from across the pond this evening, and we were talking about music, about how some songs traveled across the pond and became hits in both the UK and the U.S., while others that we never heard of here in the U.S., were big hits all across Europe.  What makes the difference?  Marketing surely plays a role, but what else?  Anyway, he tossed out a few titles to see if I knew them.  Turned out I did know 3 of the 5 he mentioned, and had, in fact, already played 2 of those 3 here on ye olde blog.  That left one that I knew and loved, and so tonight, we indulge in a bit of Simply Red!

Now, you guys already know that I am way outclassed when I’m talking music with any one of you, right?  Keith, Cheryl, David … Scott and rawgod for sure … most of you know a lot more than I do about bands, artists, and songs … I just know what I like, what stirs one emotion or another in me.  Thus, though this song takes me way back and I have always liked what I consider the slow, sensuous tone of it, and even though Simply Red has another that I like even more (I’m not telling which, for you’re gonna see it here in a day or two, but you’re welcome to take a guess) … I had no idea that Simply Red was a person, and not a group.  As my daughter used to say a lot … “Duh, Grannie”.

So, it turns out that Simply Red is Mick Hucknall, and Simply Red came about because of his red hair.  If I were to decide to become a singer at this late stage of the game, I guess I would be “Weirdly Grey”!  Hmmmm … 🤔 … 🤔 … OH WAIT!!!  People run for the exits when I start to sing!  The girls don their headphones.  The moggies run for cover!  I cannot sing!  How could I forget?

I did not find much background on this song, other than that Hucknall wrote it in his bedroom in his father’s house while still a teenager.  The song charted at #2 in Mick’s homeland, the UK, and #1 in the U.S.

Holding Back the Years
Simply Red

Holding back the years
Thinking of the fear I’ve had so long
When somebody hears
Listen to the fear that’s gone
Strangled by the wishes of pater
Hoping for the arms of mater
Get to me the sooner or later

Holding back the tears
Chance for me to escape from all I know
Holding back the tears
‘Cause nothing here has grown
I’ve wasted all my tears
Wasted all those years
Nothing had the chance to be good
Nothing ever could, yeah

I’ll keep holding on
I’ll keep holding on
I’ll keep holding on
I’ll keep holding on, so tight

Well I’ve wasted all my tears
Wasted all of those years
And nothing had the chance to be good
‘Cause nothing ever could

I’ll keep holding on
I’ll keep holding on
I’ll keep holding on
I’ll keep holding on

Holding
Holding
Holding
Holding

I said

It’s all I have today
It’s all I have to say

Songwriters: Mick Hucknall / Neil Moss
Holding Back the Years lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management

♫ Baker Street ♫ (Redux)

I didn’t intend a redux tonight … there is enough beautiful music in this world that I should be able to come up with a new one every night and never run dry.  However, our friend Annie mentioned this one in a comment on another song this evening, and she included a link, which of course I listened to.  And then, I just had to play the song again tonight!  I do love this one, and hope you do too!  Thank you, Annie, for the reminder!  The video I used last time (December 2018) wouldn’t play for some outside the U.S., so I have switched to a different video … the one Annie sent me … and hopefully it will play for everyone.


I might have skipped the song tonight and just gone to bed, for I haven’t felt well today and was tired.  But a recent conversation with our friend David left me with an earworm that just wouldn’t go away!  It is an old favourite, but one I hadn’t heard or thought about in years.  So, when it got stuck in my head tonight, I was excited at the thought of sharing it with you, my friends, and I hope you enjoy it too!

Baker Street is a song written and recorded by Scottish singer-songwriter Gerry Rafferty. Released as a single in 1978, it reached #2 on the Billboard Hot 100, where it held that position for six weeks, behind Andy Gibb’s smash Shadow Dancing. Additionally, it hit #1 in Canada, #3 in the United Kingdom, #1 in Australia, #1 in South Africa, and the top 10 in the Netherlands. Rafferty received the 1978 Ivor Novello Award for Best Song Musically and Lyrically. But perhaps the best part of the song, in my tone-deaf opinion, is the saxophone riff by Raphael Ravenscroft.

According to one story, Ravenscroft received only £27, and that check bounced, while Rafferty earned £80,000 per annum until his death in 2011. However, the bouncing check story was later denied by Ravenscroft.  

Baker Street
Gerry Rafferty

Winding your way down on Baker Street
Light in your head and dead on your feet
Well, another crazy day
You’ll drink the night away
And forget about everything

This city desert makes you feel so cold
It’s got so many people, but it’s got no soul
And it’s taken you so long
To find out you were wrong
When you thought it held everything

You used to think that it was so easy
You used to say that it was so easy
But you’re trying, you’re trying now

Another year and then you’d be happy
Just one more year and then you’d be happy
But you’re crying, you’re crying now

Way down the street there’s a light in his place
He opens the door, he’s got that look on his face
And he asks you where you’ve been
You tell him who you’ve seen
And you talk about anything

He’s got this dream about buying some land
He’s gonna give up the booze and the one-night stands
And then he’ll settle down
In some quiet little town
And forget about everything

But you know he’ll always keep moving
You know he’s never gonna stop moving
‘Cause he’s rolling, he’s the rolling stone
And when you wake up, it’s a new morning
The sun is shining, it’s a new morning
And you’re going, you’re going home

Songwriters: Gerald Rafferty
Baker Street lyrics © BMG Rights Management

♫ My Life ♫

Rawgod said he was in the mood for some of the older music by The Doors, so I went in search of …  But in my travels ‘cross the music world, I came across this and it cried out, “Me, ME … Play ME!!!”  Another night, rawgod … I promise not to forget!

This song by Billy Joel first appeared on his 1978 album 52nd Street, and a single version was released in the fall of 1978.

My  Life was used as the theme song for the ABC television series Bosom Buddies starring Tom Hanks (1980–82), albeit in a re-recorded version with a different vocalist. However, due to licensing issues it does not appear on the VHS and DVD releases of the series, nor is it used in the show’s syndicated airings.

I don’t find much trivia about this song, but the one tidbit I found fun is that Chicago members Peter Cetera and Donnie Dacus performed the backing vocals and sang along with Billy Joel during the bridge and in the outro (“Keep it to yourself, it’s my life”).

My Life
Billy Joel

Got a call from an old friend we’d used to be real close
Said he couldn’t go on the American way
Closed the shop, sold the house, bought a ticket to the west coast
Now he gives them a stand-up routine in L.A.

I don’t need you to worry for me ’cause I’m alright
I don’t want you to tell me it’s time to come home
I don’t care what you say anymore this is my life
Go ahead with your own life leave me alone

I never said you had to offer me a second chance
I never said I was a victim of circumstance
I still belong
Don’t get me wrong
And you can speak your mind
But not on my time

They will tell you you can’t sleep alone in a strange place
Then they’ll tell you can’t sleep with somebody else
Ah but sooner or later you sleep in your own space
Either way it’s O.K. you wake up with yourself

I don’t need you to worry for me ’cause I’m alright
I don’t want you to tell me it’s time to come home
I don’t care what you say anymore this is my life
Go ahead with your own life leave me alone

I never said you had to offer me a second chance
I never said I was a victim of circumstance
I still belong
Don’t get me wrong
And you can speak your mind
But not on my time

I don’t care what you say anymore this is my life
Go ahead with your own life leave me alone

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Billy Joel
My Life lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, BMG Rights Management

♫ In The Midnight Hour ♫

The year was 1965.  The artist was Wilson Pickett, and In the Midnight Hour would become his breakout hit, hitting #21 in the U.S. and #12 in the UK.  He went on to become a soul music legend and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991.

Pickett and guitarist Steve Cropper wrote this, interestingly, at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, where Martin Luther King would later be assassinated in 1968.  Said Cropper …

“I say in my shows that playing the guitar is real simple, you just follow the dots – the dots on neck on every guitar are in the same place. That’s how I came up with the intro for this. They go, It couldn’t be that simple,’ then all of them go home and get their guitars out and go, ‘Wow, it is!'”

In the Midnight Hour
Wilson Pickett

I’m gonna wait ’till the midnight hour
That’s when my love come tumbling down
I’m gonna wait ’till the midnight hour
When there’ no one else around
I’m gonna take you, girl, and hold you
And do all things I told you, in the midnight hour

Yes I am, oh yes I am
One thing I just wanna say, right here

I’m gonna wait till the stars come out
And see that twinkle in your eyes
I’m gonna wait ’till the midnight hour
That’s when my love begins to shine

You’re the only girl I know
Can really love me so, in the midnight hour

Oh yeah, in the midnight hour
Yeah, all right, play it for me one time, now

I’m gonna wait ’till the midnight hour
That’s when my love come tumbling down
I’m gonna wait, way in the midnight hour
That’s when my love begin to shine, just you and I
Oh, baby, just you and I
Nobody around, baby, just you and I
Oh, right, you know what?
I’m gonna hold you in my arms, just you and I
Oh yeah, in the midnight hour
Oh, baby, in the midnight hour

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Wilson Pickett / Steve Cropper
In the Midnight Hour lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group, Spirit Music Group, BMG Rights Management, Songtrust Ave, Warner Chappell Music Inc