Saturday Surprise — Rice Art!

Happy Saturday morning, my friends!  Here, it is snowy and cold, but not as bad as some places that are predicted to get up to two feet of snow today!  For this morning’s Saturday Surprise, I would like to introduce you to Guorui Chen, best described as a rice artist.  In a country with over a billion people who eat rice almost every day, 33-year-old Guorui Chen is the only one using rice to make Gaolou Rice Strings, a traditional art that had been lost for decades. “Nowhere else in the world can you find it,” says Chen.

Chen was born in Gaolou, a small village on the southeast coast of China where this art originated 150 years ago. However, when an octogenarian who migrated to Singapore decades ago came back to the village in late 2015, no one made these sculptures anymore. Chatting with his townspeople, he reminisced about this traditional art and how every household would participate in an annual contest of building the most sophisticated rice strings.  Says Chen …

“I was driven by curiosity at first.  I have the responsibility to carry forward this fantastic cultural tradition.”

According to Atlas Obscura …

“[Chen] only accepts rice grains longer than 7 millimeters (1/4 inch), and they have to be white, clear, straight, and undamaged. Every day, he separates intact grains from broken ones with a winnowing basket and then spends hours examining their transparency under a light.

But Chen won’t cook this rice. Instead, he turns it into art. He picks out three grains, glues them end to end into a triangle, and connects hundreds of these basic units to form shapes: a horse, a lotus flower, a temple. In his hands, rice turns into aesthetic hollow sculptures. They appear so delicate that every joint looks liable to break, but in fact, they are sturdy enough to be lifted up and moved.”

“Chen learned that the practice peaked in the early 1900s but went extinct during the ‘60s and ‘70s, when the Cultural Revolution forced people to give up their traditional roots. The only written archive he could find was from an old genealogy book of the Chen clan, taken abroad by the emigrated members. And Chen never found an image of the art itself.

He used his imagination to turn the textual descriptions into his first attempt in February 2016: a two-dimensional lotus flower glued to a plate. In the meantime, Chen found a few seniors in the village who had seen the rice strings when they were children. He took his first creation to these seniors for feedback: the type of rice was wrong, the structure could be more complex, he had made other mistakes.

So Chen took their advice, revised his work, and took it to the seniors again. In mid-2016, he was able to recreate the art to their satisfaction. By now, he has finished more than a dozen Gaolou Rice Strings sculptures, ranging from a simple teacup that takes half a day of labor to a life-size rooster that requires almost a month.

The rooster is by far his proudest work. ‘I’m like a human 3D printer, envisioning the shapes in my head and then trying to put the pieces together,’ Chen says. ‘Sometimes, the muscles in the leg were too big or too small, so I had to destroy the part I was not satisfied with and remake it.’”

Well … seeing is believing and in this case, I think a picture is worth a thousand words, so …

FUZHOU, CHINA – AUGUST 02: Chen Guorui shows his teapot-shaped artworks made of small rice grains on August 2, 2020 in Fuzhou, Fujian Province of China. Called gaoloumixian, or high buildings made with rice grains, the art form dates back to the end of the Qing Dynasty and was in a period of great prosperity during the Minguo period. The artworks were used to worship ancestors and pray for good harvests. (Photo by Lyu Ming/China News Service via Getty Images)


Well, my friends, that’s all I’ve got for this morning.  It’s frigid cold here and we had about two inches of snow … nothing compared to what the New England states are expecting … one to two feet!!!  Have a great weekend, stay warm, and find something to smile about.  😊

Saturday Surprise — Humour

I wracked my brain last night for something fun and humorous for Saturday Surprise, but perhaps because I was tired, nothing seemed to fit the bill.  I did, however, come across some things that might just bring about a chuckle or two!  First, a few stories I found on the Reader’s Digest website that made me chuckle …

  • At the doctor’s office, a 20-something man was trying to make an appointment for a Mrs. Brown. Try as he might, he just could not remember her first name. Frustrated, he left. A few minutes later, I passed him outside the office on the phone.“Hey, Dad,” he said. “What’s Mom’s first name?”

  • In his late 80s, my father-in-law went to the DMV to renew his driver’s license. At one point during the road test, he approached a four-way stop, looked to his left, and cruised straight through the stop sign. “Sir! You didn’t look to your right,” yelled the frightened inspector. My father-in-law calmly shook his head. “That’s Mum’s side.”

  • I was waiting at a small train station when a man put up a sign regarding my train: “30-Minute Delay.” “What happened?” I asked. “The train went off the rails,” he said. “How long will that take to fix?” “Quite a few hours.” “So why put up a sign saying it would take 30 minutes?” “It’s the only sign we have.”

  • A few of us were discussing the perils of drinking and driving when my five-year-old granddaughter threw in her two cents. “I can see why it would be dangerous to drink and drive,” she said. “The straw could go up your nose.”

  • When the box with my Halloween costume arrived, it was empty. I called the company and asked where my Maid Marian costume was. “We’re sorry, ma’am. We’ll send your costume tomorrow,” the representative said. “In the meantime, feel free to keep the Lady Godiva costume you got by mistake.”

  • We Uber drivers never know whom we’re going to end up with as a passenger. One day, I was driving over a new bridge, the design of which was very confusing. Completely confounded, I muttered, “I’d love to meet the genius who designed this mess.” With that, my passenger extended his hand in my direction and said, “Well, today is your lucky day. My name is Mike, I work for the county engineer’s office, and I’m the genius who designed this!” Surprisingly, he still gave me a tip.

  • I was admiring my aunt’s necklace when she surprised me by announcing, “I’m leaving it to you in my will.” I was overjoyed, perhaps too much. “Oh!” I shouted. “I’m looking forward to that!”

  • Turning to me with some urgency, my sleeping husband stated, “I have to do the cat’s taxes!”

  • A woman at our checkout counter didn’t have enough money to cover her purchase of toilet paper, so I paid the 96 cents. “Thank you,” she said. “I’m going to think of you every time I use this paper.”

  • I grew up above my father’s tavern. When we were kids, we would race each other down the stairs every morning to sweep up the bar and find the change customers had dropped during the night. Years later, as an adult, I found out that my father would throw a few coins over the bar for us to find in the morning. It cost him only a dollar a day to have us fight to be the first one to clean the bar.

  • My friend took her teenage daughter to a new doctor for a checkup. The nurse asked the usual questions, including if she had an STD. “No,” said the teen. “We have a Toyota.”

And a few work-related ‘toons …


Well, folks, that’s all I can come up with for today.  I hope you all have a good weekend.  Keep warm and safe!

Saturday Surprise — Fun Facts!

I realized too late last week that Saturday had come and gone and I hadn’t even thought of a Saturday Surprise post, so I vowed not to make the same mistake this week!  I hope you are all having a safe and relaxing weekend so far.  We are, as usual, staying in this weekend, with daughter Chris going out to pick up a few things and a carryout dinner later this evening.

I found some interesting and fun facts over at Bored Panda and I picked 10 of them to share on this post, but if you still want more, I suggest you head on over and see all 50 of them!

I can ABSOLUTELY believe this one!!!

I hope you all have a wonderful weekend and that you find something to bring you laughter and joy!

Saturday Surprise — Comedy Wildlife Awards 2021

I’m a little behind this year, but I figured there was no better topic for my first Saturday Surprise post in three months than some funny critters!  The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards“began its life modestly in 2015 as a photographic competition. Since then, steered by its founders, Paul Joynson-Hicks MBE and Tom Sullam, it has grown into a globally renowned competition seen by millions of people every year, and always with wildlife conservation at its heart. The free competition, open to wildlife photography experts and novices, celebrates the hilarity of our natural world and highlights what we need to do to protect it. From a surprised otter to a swearing turtle, Comedy Wildlife’s photographs transcend cultures and ages to bring a smile to everyone’s face.”  What better way to start the weekend than with a smile, yes?

If you’d like to look back at previous year’s Comedy Wildlife Photography posts, here are the links:

2018

2019

2020


Ken Jensen — Ouch! — “A golden silk monkey in Yunnan China – this is actually a show of aggression however in the position that the monkey is in it looks quite painful!”

Arthur Trevino — Ninja Prairie Dog! — “When this Bald Eagle missed on its attempt to grab this prairie dog, the prairie dog jumped towards the eagle and startled it long enough to escape to a nearby burrow. A real David vs Goliath story!.”

John Speirs — I guess summer’s over — “I was taking pics of pigeons in flight when this leaf landed on the bird’s face.”

Chee Kee Teo — Time for school — “A smooth-coated otter “bit” its baby otter to bring it back to and fro for swimming lesson.”

Vicki Jauron — The Joy of a Mud Bath — “An elephant expresses his joy in taking a mud bath against the dead trees on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zimbabwe on a hot afternoon.”

Andy Parkinson — Let’s dance — “Two Kamchatka bear cubs square up for a celebratory play fight having successfully navigated a raging torrent (small stream!)”

Chu han lin — See who jumps high — Mudskipper, Taiwan

David Eppley — Majestic and Graceful Bald Eagle — “Bald Eagles will use the same nest for years, even decades, adding new material to it at the beginning and throughout the nesting season. Normally, they are highly skilled at snapping branches off of trees while in flight. Possibly tired from working nonstop all morning on a new nest, this particular Bald Eagle wasn’t showing its best form. Yes, sometimes they miss. Although this looks painful, and it might very well be, the eagle recovers with just a few sweeping wing strokes, and choses to rest a bit before making another lumber run.”

Jakub Hodan — Treehugger — “This Proboscis monkey could be just scratching its nose on the rough bark, or it could be kissing it. Trees play a big role in the lives of monkeys. Who are we to judge…”

Jan Piecha — ‘Secrets’ — “The little raccoon cubs are telling secrets to each other”

Lea Scaddan — Missed — “Two Western Grey Kangaroos were fighting and one missed kicking him in the stomach.”

Nicolas de VAULX — How do you get that damn window open? — “This raccoon spends his time trying to get into houses out of curiosity and perhaps also to steal food.”

Pal Marchhart — Peekaboo — “ A young bear descending from a tree looks like he/she is playing hide and seek.”

Roland Kranitz — I got you — “I spent my days in my usual “gopher place” and yet again, these funny little animals haven’t belied their true nature.”


I hope you all have a great weekend … no doubt with this being the final weekend before Christmas, most of you will be doing last minute shopping, decorating, baking, wrapping, etc.  Have fun!!!  🎄🎁🎅

Saturday Surprise!!!

jack in box-2

SURPRISE!!!!  It’s a Fred-in-the-Box!!!

Given an over-abundance of angst and exhaustion, both mental and physical, I am taking the very lazy way out tonight and reduxing one of my first Saturday Surprise posts.  Naturally, you won’t be surprised to learn it’s a critter post!  This was first posted in 2017 at a time when I apparently felt much as I do tonight!  Still, the cuteness factor never loses its charm.  I hope you enjoy these …


Well, folks, it’s been a long week … what?  You say it was actually a short week, since Monday was a holiday?  Sigh.  Then it’s been an even longer week — a long, short week, as it were.  I don’t know about you guys, but I am t-i-r-e-d.  So, I’ve decided to take a little break from doing much writing today and just show you some cute/funny animals.  I like animals.  They do not waste their days (and nights) arguing over politics, climate, sports, the opposite sex, or anything.  If they have an issue with a fellow critter, they duke it out, maybe eat their nemesis, then get on with whatever business they were doing.  A simple, straightforward approach to life.  Humans, however, think they were endowed with a ‘superior’ brain, thus they spend all their time proving just how inane they really are.  And on that note … let us view some furry dudes and have something cute to start the weekend with a smile.

Hugs ‘n kisses … now who wouldn’t love these?

pygmy-marmosets

These are ‘pygmy marmosets’, and they are actually the smallest species of monkey, found in the Amazon rain forests.. Don’t they just melt your heart?

SNOWBALL FIGHT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  BRING IT ON!!!

Baby-bear

“Guys…guys….hey guys, i cant see you, are you home?? I’ve been trying to call all day but no one will answer.”

I posted the bear pic on my Facebook timeline yesterday, and people just started writing captions.  So, I decided I would use the best caption on this post.  Caption credit goes to my friend, James (Jimmy) Schrauder.  Thanks, Jimmy!  (Note … James (Jimmy) Schrauder died two years later in October 2019 at the age of only 30 😢)

Bengal-cat

This, folks, is a Bengal cat.  No, not a tiger, a domestic cat, developed to look like exotic jungle cats such as leopards, ocelots, margays and clouded leopards. They typically weigh between 8-15 pounds.

pandas.jpg

You know I couldn’t resist including a panda!

koalas

Or a couple of snuggly koalas …

Japanese-dwarf-flying-squirrels

Awwwwww …. say ‘hello’ to these adorable Japanese Dwarf Flying Squirrels.  They are native to Japan, where they are said to be relatively common.  They grow only to about 8 inches.

baby elephant

Brrrrrrr …. this baby elephant looks rather cold, don’t you think?

baby deer

And last, but not least, a sleeping baby deer.  BAMBI!!!!!

And now, we’ve had our share of cuteness to start out the weekend.  I hope you enjoyed the animals.  Now it’s time for Filosofa to do the thing that I have been putting off for the entire summer, and clean out the storage closet out back.  Sigh.  Fortunately I have a helper … Miss Goose will be doing the heavy lifting and carting off to the trash, while I supervise and determine what stays and what goes.

I hope you all have a great weekend!  Hugs ‘n love from Filosofa!

Saturday Surprise — Pareidolia (?)

Okay, so it’s time for a Saturday Surprise post.  I skipped over it last week … I don’t remember why now, but either I wasn’t inspired or I had something I wanted to get off my chest (like our cat Pandi, who LOVES to lie on our chests!)  At any rate, today I am determined you will start your weekend with a smile … GOT THAT???

I wasn’t quite sure, when I came across the term, what ‘pareidolia’ was, so I looked it up and found that it is:  the tendency to perceive a specific, often meaningful image in a random or ambiguous visual pattern.  The scientific explanation for some people is pareidolia, or the human ability to see shapes or make pictures out of randomness.  Um … okay.  Probably better that I show you  … in some cases the captions steal the show!

After Stewing In His Emotions, Emo Veg Comes To The Conclusion That The Root Of The World’s Problems Is That People Don’t Seem To Carrot All

This Tomato Looks Like A Duck

Leonardo da Vinci, for example, described seeing characters in natural markings on stone walls, which he believed could help inspire his artworks. And in the 1950s, the Bank of Canada had to withdraw a series of banknotes because people saw a grinning devil leaping from the curls of the Queen’s hair.

The Evolved Radish

Alien Pickle

Going To Have To Eat This Chicken As It Hasn’t Laid A Single Bloody Egg Yet

Sometimes, an abnormal look can make fruits and veggies land in the bin. Of course, food waste exists across the food supply chain due to pests and mold, poor climate control, and household waste, but imperfect produce is often turned away by grocery stores for not meeting strict cosmetic standards as well, making up around 40% of total food waste.

This Incredible Carrot Hand Was Found While Digging Juice Carrots At Our Farm Today

She Thought He Did Not Carrot All, But He Bought Her 21-Carrot Ring

Foot Shaped Radish Goes On Display

Reducing food loss has been identified as one of the most effective ways to improve food security – an increasingly important challenge as the global population continues to grow. Plus, food waste also hugely contributes to global warming and our carbon footprint.

But ugly food is fighting back. More and more companies are selling ugly produce and using it in their products, reversing the fate of discarded monstrosities to delicious, perfectly edible, and nutritious food.

The ugly produce movement also has the potential to pass lower prices onto customers.

So if you stumble upon a radish that resembles a foot — buy it. You’ll be doing your part.

Kawaii Gourd

This Banana Looks Exactly Like My Mom’s Dog

This Onion Looks Like An Angry Bird

That’s A Sweet Beartato

F**k You Too, Broccoli

This Tomato That Grew In Our Garden Is Shaped Like A Butterfly

This Strawberry Looks Like A Butterfly

Best Eggplant Ever

My Wife’s Bell Pepper Looks Like A Big Nosed Grumpy Old Man Smoking A Cig

The Happiest Potato I’ve Ever Seen

I hope you’ve enjoyed today’s trip through the funny produce aisles … and maybe even learned a new word!  Have a wonderful weekend, my friends!!!

Saturday Surprise — Shell Art!

I do not have a single artistic bone in my entire body, so I am always amazed by the talent and creativity of some artists, especially the likes of street artists and others whose art is … shall we say not quite traditional.  So, I was impressed by the work of Anna Chan, a jeweler and designer. The New York-based artist, not having much work during the height of the pandemic, went to Robert Moses State Park, where she would spend her days by the beach. There she started sand sculpting as she had an idea to create 12 art pieces for a 2021 calendar. Soon this evolved into “an obsession”: creating beautiful, symmetrical mosaics and real-life animal portraits.  I hope you enjoy Anna’s creative works and that it starts your weekend out with a smile!

The portraits are so detailed that one might only wonder how long it takes to make one mosaic. According to Anna, larger creations take a minimum of 3 days to a week or more.

“The mosaic work looks simple once completed but finding the right shell piece to fit into space can be challenging. When I first started at the beach, I was able to complete them in 5-6 hours from collecting shells to finished sculpture, but my work has since evolved and become more detailed and dimensional, which requires extra care and precision while putting it together.”

“Sand by nature doesn’t hold shape so the challenge is to compact the sand with water so it’s solid enough to endure the long mosaic process. The challenge is making sure the sand is moist just enough to be compact but not too wet or dry that it will fall apart. And like putting together a puzzle, finding the right shell piece for the right space takes time, and sometimes I have to collect more to find the right fit. Since nothing is holding the shells in place but the damp sand, some areas that are vertical sand wall may take several tries to get the shells to stay in place and it can fall apart with the slightest touch. So, a steady hand and lots of patience is key”.

Creating things from what nature gives you is as difficult as it is interesting. The question is where to start? What comes first? The idea or the material? What Anna does first is she collects seashells of different shapes and colors to match the idea she has. After this, she models the shape of the animal from the sand:

“I enjoy this part of the process the most as sand is such a fun medium to work with. It is very forgiving and shapes easily without tools. However, the sculpture is only half finished without the shell embellishments. I liken it to putting a puzzle together, every piece has its place and they all have to fit perfectly to create a mosaic effect. It is akin to inlay work in jewelry, which I’m very fond of. The final step is to make them permanent, which I’m fine tuning the process at this point.”

Where do these animal sculptures go after they are finished? Her first pieces were disassembled as they were ephemeral, but now, since her art is permanent, it all can be found in her home garage, where she spends her time working on these mosaics.

“I still have to refine my process to make the larger sculptures permanent, so hopefully in the near future, they will find a place in a gallery wall or a collector’s home.”

“As an artist, it is my mission to keep pushing the boundaries. I have only worked with sand for one year but I feel a true connection to this medium I have never felt with anything else before. There’s nothing more liberating than creating using just my bare hands and seeing my ideas come to life.”

“I have so many ideas and directions I want 03to try with sand. I want to bring my sand technique back to my roots as a jeweler and make some experimental pieces. Also, my goal is to lift the sand off the flat surface so it won’t be just a bas relief but a 3-dimensional sculpture. I envision my work in 6 months will be very different from what it is today, but equally delightful.”

One of the things she will present in the future is a sand kit that will be found on www.annachan-art.com.

Saturday Surprise — In Pictures

I started the Saturday Surprise feature in late August 2017, and this post was only the third one I ever did — the first one featuring unique animals.  I don’t typically redux Saturday Surprise, but frankly this week I drew a blank in whatever direction I tried to head.  So, those of you who are long-time readers — pretend you didn’t see this one in September 2017!  For the rest of you it will be new and I hope you enjoy these critters!  (The header image is, for me, like looking in the mirror first thing in the morning!)


One of the suggestions for the new Saturday Surprise feature came from Eschudel of Zombie Flamingos who suggested a ‘Snapshot Saturday’ with unusual or interesting pictures from the week.  Sounded like a good idea, so I went in search of and found a hodge-podge of unusual, touching pictures, but as I was loading them onto this post, I concluded that there needed to be a theme.  So, I sat down and ate dinner, responded to comments from the day, chatted a bit with the family, and then when I came back to work, a theme hit me!  (No, it didn’t hurt … at least not much.)  What about unusual animals?  So, I once again went in search of … and I found some really, really strange creatures (no, I wasn’t in a bar!!!).  So … sit back and take a look at some of these guys!

The Panda Ant

Panda-ant

The Mutillidae are a family of more than 3,000 species of wasps (despite the names) whose wingless females resemble large, hairy ants. Found in Chile, they are known for their extremely painful stings, hence the common name cow killer or cow ant. Black and white specimens are sometimes known as panda ants due to their hair coloration resembling that of the Chinese giant panda. (Image credits: Chris Lukhaup)

Hummingbird Hawk-Moth

hawk-moth-1

hawk-moth-2

As this hawk-moth feeds on flowers and makes a similar humming sound, it looks a lot like a hummingbird. What’s interesting is that it is surprisingly good at learning colors. (Image credits: Jerzy Strzelecki | unknown)

Glaucus Atlanticus (aka Blue Dragon)

blue-dragon-1.jpg

blue-dragon-2

blue-dragon-3.jpg

Also known as the blue dragon, this creature is a is a species of blue sea slug. You could find it in warm waters of the oceans, as it floats on the surface because of a gas-filled sac in its stomach. (Image credits: unknown | unknown | paulhypnos)

Venezuelan Poodle Moth

poodle-moth-1

poodle-moth-2

Discovered in Venezuela in 2009, this new species of alien-looking moth is still poorly explored. Waiting for more info about them! (Image credits: Arthur Anker | imgur)

The Blue Parrotfish

parrotfish-1

parrotfish-2

This bright blue fish can be found in the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, and spends 80% of its time searching for food. (Image credits: imgur | depalmadise)

Okapi

Okapi-1.jpg

Okapi-2

This mammal is native to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Central Africa. Despite the zebra-like stripes, it is actually more closely related to giraffes. (Image credits: marylandzoo.org | baynews9.com)

Sea Pig

sea pig-1

sea pig-2

sea pig-3

Scotoplanes live on deep ocean bottoms, specifically on the abyssal plain in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean, typically at depths of over 1000 meters. They are deposit feeders, and obtain food by extracting organic particles from deep-sea mud. (Image credits: imgur | thedailygreen.com | realcoldfish)

Aye-aye

Aye-aye-1.jpg

Aye-aye-2.jpg

Due to its bizarre appearance and unusual feeding habits, the aye-aye is considered by many to be the strangest primate in the world. It is the world’s largest nocturnal primate. Unusual physical characteristics include incisors that are continually growing (unique among primates), extremely large ears, and a middle finger which is skeletal in appearance, and is used by the animal as a primary sensory organ.

Aren’t they all just adorable?  Which was your favourite?  I am torn between the Okapi and the Aye-aye.  I had fun finding these guys … there are many, many more, so we shall do this again sometime soon.

Stay tuned for next week’s Saturday Surprise!

Saturday Surprise — Comedy Wildlife!

Every September for the past three years, I have posted some of the winning photos from the annual Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards (links to prior years at bottom of post).  The contest is open through June 20th, and winners are announced in September, but this year I have some preview entries that have already been received, and I thought they might make a good way to start the weekend with a smile!

“Quarantine Life” By Kevin Biskaborn

“Isolated inside with your family eager to get out and explore the world? These eastern raccoon kits are too. Just when you think there’s no more room in the tree hollow, mother raccoon appears and displays just how compact the space is. The babies clambered all over their mom and each another, struggling to take a look at the exact same time. This photo was taken in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. After exploring a particular area with numerous tree hallows, I identified it as a hot spot for raccoon families. Since raccoons will move from den to den, often not spending more than one night at a time in a particular den, locating an area with numerous options is key to locating the animals. I stumbled across this family and immediately worked on leveling the camera with the hole to prevent an upward angle. When the camera and tripod were ready, the baby raccoons were extremely curious (and cooperative), sticking their heads out for a closer look!”

“Monday Morning Mood” By Andrew Mayes

“I took this shot while photographing a group of Pied starlings perched in a tree at the Rietvlei Nature Reserve in South Africa. It perfectly sums up my mood on most Monday mornings :)”

“Bald Eagle Gets A Surprise” By Arthur Trevino

“When this Bald Eagle missed on its attempt to grab this prairie dog, the prairie dog jumped towards the eagle and startled it long enough to escape to a nearby burrow. A real David vs Goliath story!”

“ROFL” By Giovanni Querzani

“A young lion in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, who apparently is laughing at my photography skills.”

“Yay – It’s Friday!” By Lucy Beveridge

“A young springbok, all ears and spindly legs, caught in midair while pronking as the sun started to rise over the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park. There’s not much information on why the Springbok pronk but some theories suggest it is a way of showing fitness and strength to ward off predators and attract mates. It has also been said that this small, dainty and largely unappreciated antelope also pronks out of excitement, jumping for joy!”

“Yoga Bittern” By KT Wong

“A Yellow Bittern was trying very hard to get into a comfortable hunting position. I got this shot when it was between 2 stalks of lotus flower.”

“Happy” By Tom Svensson

“These penguins was surfing on the waves on to land and looked so happy each time”

“Sweet-Lips Are For Kissing” By Philipp Stahr

“This picture was taken at Curaçao, Dutch Caribbean. Usually box fishes are difficult to take pictures of, since they do not have a problem of a diver coming close, but if you show interest, they always turn the back and not the face to you. That’s why I tried to swim 0.5m above the fish and showing no interest at all to him. The same time I had my camera not in front of me, but below at my chest pointing to the bottom. When the right moment had come, I turned the camera 90 degrees to the front and just point and shoot, hoping to have the fish in focus. Never expected to have its beautiful lips that close!”

“Houston We’ve Had A Problem” By Txema Garcia Laseca

“This fish is astonished when has been trapped for a fisher bird.”

“Missed” By Lea Scaddan

“Two Western Grey Kangaroos were fighting and one missed kicking him in the stomach.” (I really thought it looked like they were dancing!)

“Cranky Hippo” By Rohin Bakshi

“The baby hippo wanted his mother’s attention, but it seems he wasn’t getting any…”

I’ll be back in September with more, once the final tally is in!  Meanwhile, if you’re interested in entering the contest yourself, it is open to both amateur and professional photographers, so visit their website to find out more!

Prior years’ posts Comedy Wildlife posts:

2018

2019

2020

Have a happy weekend, my friends!