♫ Bring It On Home To Me ♫ (Redux)

It’s been a while since I played some Sam Cooke, hasn’t it?  Like a few others in my repertoire, Cooke is always good for a nice, mellow sound.  I have played this one only once, almost exactly three years ago on September 4th, 2019.

This song, written by Cooke, was released on May 8, 1962  as the ‘B-side’ to Having a Party.  The song was initially offered to fellow singer Dee Clark, who turned it down.  It is one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.

Bring it on Home has been recorded by numerous artists in a variety of styles.  Lou Rawls, who sang the background call-and-response on Cooke’s version, recorded his own in 1970.  The Animals made it a UK hit 1965, Eddie Floyd’s version went to US #17 in 1968, and Mickey Gilley had a #1 Country Hit with the song in 1976.  It has also been featured in a number of television series and movies … none of which I have ever seen … go figure.

I will offer up two versions tonight … my preference, always, is the Sam Cooke version, but I am also playing The Animals version for a couple of reasons.  One, a number of you hail from the UK where this one was the more well-received, and two, I know that our friend rawgod is a fan of Eric Burdon and the Animals.

Bring It On Home to Me
Sam Cooke

If you ever change your mind
About leaving, leaving me behind
Oh, oh, bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

I know I laughed when you left
But now I know I only hurt myself
Oh, oh, bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

I’ll give you jewelry and money too
That ain’t all, that ain’t all I’ll do for you
Oh, if bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

You know I’ll always be your slave
‘Till I’m buried, buried in my grave
Oh, honey bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

One more thing
I tried to treat you right
But you stayed out, stayed out at night
But I forgive you, bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

Songwriters: Sam Cooke
Bring It On Home to Me lyrics © Abkco Music, Inc

♫ The House Of The Rising Sun ♫ (Redux)

I know I’ve been reduxing a lot lately, but I’ve just not had the energy at the end of the day to delve into new material.  Please bear with me … I promise to do better soon!   I’ve only played this one once, about a year-and-a-half ago, so I’m hoping you won’t mind listening again today!


According to Wikipedia …

Like many classic folk ballads, ‘The House of the Rising Sun’ is of uncertain authorship. Musicologists say that it is based on the tradition of broadside ballads, and thematically it has some resemblance to the 16th-century ballad “The Unfortunate Rake”, yet there is no evidence suggesting that there is any direct relation.  According to Alan Lomax, “Rising Sun” was the name of a bawdy house in two traditional English songs, and it was also a name for English pubs.[5] He further suggested that the melody might be related to a 17th-century folk song, “Lord Barnard and Little Musgrave”, also known as “Matty Groves”, but a survey by Bertrand Bronson showed no clear relationship between the two songs. Lomax proposed that the location of the house was then relocated from England to New Orleans by White Southern performers. However, folklorist Vance Randolph proposed an alternative French origin, the “rising sun” referring to the decorative use of the sunburst insignia dating to the time of Louis XIV, which was brought to North America by French immigrants.

“House of Rising Sun” was said to have been known by miners in 1905.[6] The oldest published version of the lyrics is that printed by Robert Winslow Gordon in 1925, in a column “Old Songs That Men Have Sung” in Adventure magazine. The lyrics of that version begin:

There is a house in New Orleans, it’s called the Rising Sun
It’s been the ruin of many poor girl
Great God, and I for one.

The oldest known recording of the song, under the title “Rising Sun Blues”, is by Appalachian artists Clarence “Tom” Ashley and Gwen Foster, who recorded it on September 6, 1933 on the Vocalion label (02576). Ashley said he had learned it from his grandfather, Enoch Ashley. Roy Acuff, an “early-day friend and apprentice” of Ashley’s, learned it from him and recorded it as “Rising Sun” on November 3, 1938. Several older blues recordings of songs with similar titles are unrelated, for example, “Rising Sun Blues” by Ivy Smith (1927) and “The Risin’ Sun” by Texas Alexander (1928). There is a common perception that prior to The Animals the song was about and from the perspective of a woman. This is incorrect, as the narrative of the lyrics has been continually whipped back and forth from a female to a male cautionary tale. The earliest known printed version from Gordon’s column is about a woman’s warning. The earliest known recording of the song by Ashley is about a rounder, a male character. The lyrics of that version begin:

There is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
Where many poor boys to destruction has gone
And me, oh God, are one.

This song has been recorded by Woody Guthrie, Glenn Yarbrough, Joan Baez, and Bob Dylan, to name a few, but the most famous version remains that of The Animals.  According to The Animals’ drummer John Steel …

“We Played Liverpool on May 17, 1964 and then drove to London where Mickie had booked a studio for ITV’s Ready Steady Go! Because of the reaction we were getting to ‘Rising Sun,’ we asked to record it and he said, ‘Okay we’ll do it at the same session.’ We set up for balance, played a few bars for the engineer – it was mono with no overdubs – and we only did one take. We listened to it and Mickie said, ‘That’s it, it’s a single.’ The engineer said it was too long, but instead of chopping out a bit, Mickie had the courage to say, ‘We’re in a microgroove world now, we will release it.’ A few weeks later it was #1 all over the world. When we knocked The Beatles off the top in America, they sent us a telegram which read, ‘Congratulations from The Beatles (a group)’.”

House Of The Rising Sun
The Animals

There is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy
Dear God, I know I was one

My mother was a tailor
She sewed my new blue jeans
And my father was a gamblin’ man
Way down in New Orleans

And the only thing a gambler needs
Is a suitcase in the trunk
And the only time he’s satisfied
Is when he’s on a drunk

Oh mother, tell your children
Not to do what I have done
Don’t spend your life in sin and misery
In the House of the Rising Sun

I got one foot on the platform
And another on the train
And I’m goin’ back to New Orleans
To wear that ball and chain

There is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy
Dear God, I know I was one
Dear God, I know I was the one

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Alan Price
House Of The Rising Sun lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

♫ The House Of The Rising Sun ♫

I can’t believe that I haven’t played this one already, but according to my trusty archives, I have not.  I never knew there was so much history, so much background to this song, for I thought the Animals were the first to record it and that was that.  Oh no … not by a longshot!

According to Wikipedia …

Like many classic folk ballads, ‘The House of the Rising Sun’ is of uncertain authorship. Musicologists say that it is based on the tradition of broadside ballads, and thematically it has some resemblance to the 16th-century ballad “The Unfortunate Rake”, yet there is no evidence suggesting that there is any direct relation.  According to Alan Lomax, “Rising Sun” was the name of a bawdy house in two traditional English songs, and it was also a name for English pubs.[5] He further suggested that the melody might be related to a 17th-century folk song, “Lord Barnard and Little Musgrave”, also known as “Matty Groves”, but a survey by Bertrand Bronson showed no clear relationship between the two songs. Lomax proposed that the location of the house was then relocated from England to New Orleans by White Southern performers. However, folklorist Vance Randolph proposed an alternative French origin, the “rising sun” referring to the decorative use of the sunburst insignia dating to the time of Louis XIV, which was brought to North America by French immigrants.

“House of Rising Sun” was said to have been known by miners in 1905.[6] The oldest published version of the lyrics is that printed by Robert Winslow Gordon in 1925, in a column “Old Songs That Men Have Sung” in Adventure magazine.[9] The lyrics of that version begin:

There is a house in New Orleans, it’s called the Rising Sun
It’s been the ruin of many poor girl
Great God, and I for one.

The oldest known recording of the song, under the title “Rising Sun Blues”, is by Appalachian artists Clarence “Tom” Ashley and Gwen Foster, who recorded it on September 6, 1933 on the Vocalion label (02576). Ashley said he had learned it from his grandfather, Enoch Ashley. Roy Acuff, an “early-day friend and apprentice” of Ashley’s, learned it from him and recorded it as “Rising Sun” on November 3, 1938. Several older blues recordings of songs with similar titles are unrelated, for example, “Rising Sun Blues” by Ivy Smith (1927) and “The Risin’ Sun” by Texas Alexander (1928). There is a common perception that prior to The Animals the song was about and from the perspective of a woman. This is incorrect, as the narrative of the lyrics has been continually whipped back and forth from a female to a male cautionary tale. The earliest known printed version from Gordon’s column is about a woman’s warning. The earliest known recording of the song by Ashley is about a rounder, a male character. The lyrics of that version begin:

There is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
Where many poor boys to destruction has gone
And me, oh God, are one.

This song has been recorded by Woody Guthrie, Glenn Yarbrough, Joan Baez, and Bob Dylan, to name a few, but the most famous version remains that of The Animals.  According to The Animals’ drummer John Steel …

“We Played Liverpool on May 17, 1964 and then drove to London where Mickie had booked a studio for ITV’s Ready Steady Go! Because of the reaction we were getting to ‘Rising Sun,’ we asked to record it and he said, ‘Okay we’ll do it at the same session.’ We set up for balance, played a few bars for the engineer – it was mono with no overdubs – and we only did one take. We listened to it and Mickie said, ‘That’s it, it’s a single.’ The engineer said it was too long, but instead of chopping out a bit, Mickie had the courage to say, ‘We’re in a microgroove world now, we will release it.’ A few weeks later it was #1 all over the world. When we knocked The Beatles off the top in America, they sent us a telegram which read, ‘Congratulations from The Beatles (a group)’.”

House Of The Rising Sun
The Animals

There is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy
Dear God, I know I was one

My mother was a tailor
She sewed my new blue jeans
And my father was a gamblin’ man
Way down in New Orleans

And the only thing a gambler needs
Is a suitcase in the trunk
And the only time he’s satisfied
Is when he’s on a drunk

Oh mother, tell your children
Not to do what I have done
Don’t spend your life in sin and misery
In the House of the Rising Sun

I got one foot on the platform
And another on the train
And I’m goin’ back to New Orleans
To wear that ball and chain

There is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy
Dear God, I know I was one
Dear God, I know I was the one

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Alan Price
House Of The Rising Sun lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

♫ Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood ♫ (Redux)

Another redux tonight, I’m afraid, but it has been quite a while since I played it — July 2018 — so I was hoping I could get by with it tonight, for I am Tired with a capital ‘T’.


Who doesn’t remember Eric Burdon and The Animals?  My favourite is actually House of the Rising Sun, but for the last two days, this one has been stuck in my head, and I’m hoping that by sharing it, it will leave my head and jump into yours!  Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood was initially written for jazz singer and pianist, Nina Simone.  The Animals recorded the song in 1964.  The Animals lead singer, Eric Burdon, would later say of the song, “It was never considered pop material, but it somehow got passed on to us and we fell in love with it immediately.”

In case you’re interested, this is Eric Burdon today …eric-burdon

Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood

The Animals

Baby, do you understand me now?

Sometimes I feel a little mad

But don’t you know that no one alive can always be an angel

When things go wrong I feel real bad.

I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Baby, sometimes I’m so carefree

With a joy that’s hard to hide

And sometimes it seems that, all I have to do is worry

And then you’re bound to see my other side

I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

If I seem edgy, I want you to know,

That I never mean to take it out on you

Life has its problems, and I get my share,

And that’s one thing I never mean to do

Cause I love you,

Oh,

Oh, oh, oh, baby – don’t you know I’m human

I have thoughts like any other one

Sometimes I find myself, Lord, regretting

Some foolish thing, some little simple thing I’ve done

I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Yes, I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Yes, I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Yes, I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Songwriters: Bennie Benjamin / Gloria Caldwell / Sol Marcus

Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood lyrics © Warner Chappell Music France

♫ We Gotta Get Out Of This Place ♫

A few days ago, our friend rawgod mentioned that he was in the mood for some of the Animals earlier music, and I kept getting sidetracked, so I hadn’t as yet played one for him.  Of course, the first to come to mind was their iconic House of the Rising Sun, but I had already played that one.  Then I thought of Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood, which perfectly suits rawgod, but alas, I had already played that one, too!  Both are worthy of a redux, but I wanted to do something new, so my next favourite is this one, We Gotta Get Outta This Place.

This was written by the husband and wife songwriting team of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil.  Mann and Weil wrote and recorded the song as a demo, with Mann singing and playing piano. It was intended for The Righteous Brothers, for whom they had written the number one hit You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ but then Mann gained a recording contract for himself, and his label Red Bird Records wanted him to release it instead. Meanwhile, record executive Allen Klein had heard it and gave the demo to Mickie Most, the Animals’ producer. Most already had a call out to Brill Building songwriters for material for the group’s next recording session and the Animals recorded it before Mann could.

The arrangement featured a distinctive bass lead by group member Chas Chandler. This was the first single not to be recorded by the original line-up, following as it did the departure of keyboard player Alan Price and his replacement by Dave Rowberry. It featured one of singer Eric Burdon’s typically raw, fierce vocals. Rolling Stone described the overall effect as a “harsh white-blues treatment from The Animals. As Burdon put it, ‘Whatever suited our attitude, we just bent to our own shape.'”

The song reached #2 on the UK pop singles chart on August 14, 1965 (held out of the top slot by the Beatles’ Help!). The following month, it reached #13 on the U.S. pop singles chart, its highest placement there. In Canada, the song also reached #2, on September 20, 1965.

At the time, the song was understandably very popular with United States Armed Forces members stationed in South Vietnam during the Vietnam War.

We Gotta Get out of This Place
The Animals

In this dirty old part of the city
Where the sun refused to shine
People tell me there ain’t no use in tryin’

Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know

Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
Oh yes I know it

(Yeah!) He’s been workin’ so hard
(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every night and day
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)

We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
’cause girl, there’s a better life for me and you

Now my girl you’re so young and pretty
And one thing I know is true, yeah
You’ll be dead before your time is due, I know it

Watch my daddy in bed a-dyin’
Watched his hair been turnin’ grey, yeah
He’s been workin’ and slavin’ his life away
I know he’s been workin’ so hard

(Yeah!) I’ve been workin’ too, baby
(Yeah!) Every day baby
(Yeah!) Whoa!
(Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!)

We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Somewhere baby, somehow I know it

We gotta get out of this place
If it’s the last thing we ever do
We gotta get out of this place
Girl, there’s a better life for me and you
Believe me baby
I know it baby
You know it too

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Barry Mann / Cynthia Weil
We Gotta Get out of This Place lyrics © EMI Music Publishing

♫ Bring It On Home To Me ♫

It’s been a while since I played some Sam Cooke, hasn’t it?  Well, tonight I am in the mood for something Sam-Cooke-ish, so …

This song, written by Cooke, was released on May 8, 1962  as the ‘B-side’ to Having a Party.  The song was initially offered to fellow singer Dee Clark, who turned it down.  It is one of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.

Bring it on Home has been recorded by numerous artists in a variety of styles.  Lou Rawls, who sang the background call-and-response on Cooke’s version, recorded his own in 1970.  The Animals made it a UK hit 1965, Eddie Floyd’s version went to US #17 in 1968, and Mickey Gilley had a #1 Country Hit with the song in 1976.  It has also been featured in a number of television series and movies … none of which I have ever seen … go figure.

I will offer up two versions tonight … my preference, always, is the Sam Cooke version, but I am also playing The Animals version for a couple of reasons.  One, a number of you hail from the UK where this one was the more well-received, and two, I know that our friend rawgod is a fan of Eric Burdon and the Animals.

Bring It On Home to Me
Sam Cooke

If you ever change your mind
About leaving, leaving me behind
Oh, oh, bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

I know I laughed when you left
But now I know I only hurt myself
Oh, oh, bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

I’ll give you jewelry and money too
That ain’t all, that ain’t all I’ll do for you
Oh, if bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

You know I’ll always be your slave
‘Till I’m buried, buried in my grave
Oh, honey bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

One more thing
I tried to treat you right
But you stayed out, stayed out at night
But I forgive you, bring it to me
Bring your sweet loving
Bring it on home to me
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)
Yeah (yeah), yeah (yeah)

Songwriters: Sam Cooke
Bring It On Home to Me lyrics © Abkco Music, Inc

♫ Serenade To A Sweet Lady ♫

I must admit to having let the ball drop on this one.  Back in November, rawgod noted that I hadn’t played any instrumentals and asked if I would consider this song, Serenade to a Sweet Lady, for a quiet Sunday.  I listened to it for the first time, liked it, and told him that yes, I would like to play it.  And then, I promptly forgot.  My oversight is doubly embarrassing, since he asked me to consider it his dedication to me!  And still I forgot.  I am old and losing my memory.  Anyway, moving on …

This song by Eric Burdon & The Animals was never released as a single, but only on their album Every One of Us, released in 1968.

Every One of Us was the second of three albums released by the band in the United States in that year (the album was not released in the United Kingdom). The single from the album was White Houses, which charted in the United States and Canada. The album was described by reviewer Bruce Eder of Allmusic as “a good psychedelic blues album, filled with excellent musicianship.”

Thank you, rawgod, for both the suggestion and the dedication.  😊

♫ The House Of The Rising Sun ♫

Tonight, you get just the music and the lyrics.  The history will have to come later …

The House of the Rising Sun
The Animals

My mother, she was a tailor
Sewed these new bluejeans
My father was a gamblin’ man
Way down in New Orleans

My mother, she would look at me
She said, son, you’ve got a long road ahead
Son, some may roll and make you crazy
But don’t forget these words I said

And don’t forget what your name is
And know what the game is

From the North coast to the South coast
From country to country
Mind to mind
Generation to generation

From time to time
And to sniff across your mind

To go downtown
And to hang around
The House of The Rising Sun

Mother was a tailor
Sewed these new blue-jeans
Father was a gamblin’ man, yea yea
Way down, way down, in New Orleans

And the only thing a gambling man needs
Is some cash, ooh lord, and a trunk
And the only time he’s satisfied, ya ya
Is when he’s on some form of drug

Ya-aah, board and bought, oh no
To where, I do belong
I’m wandering back
To earn my pays, in The House
They call, the Rising Sun

Mother tell your baby children, yea yea
Don’t do the things that I’ve done
Spend your life in sin and misery
In The House, they call, the Rising Sun

Ohh
House, of The Rising, Sun

Songwriters: Uncertain
The House of the Rising Sun lyrics © Carlin America Inc

♫ Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood ♫

Who doesn’t remember Eric Burdon and The Animals?  My favourite is actually House of the Rising Sun, but for the last two days, this one has been stuck in my head, and I’m hoping that by sharing it, it will leave my head and jump into yours!  Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood was initially written for jazz singer and pianist, Nina Simone.  The Animals recorded the song in 1964.  The Animals lead singer, Eric Burdon, would later say of the song, “It was never considered pop material, but it somehow got passed on to us and we fell in love with it immediately.”

In case you’re interested, this is Eric Burdon today …eric-burdon

Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood

The Animals

Baby, do you understand me now?

Sometimes I feel a little mad

But don’t you know that no one alive can always be an angel

When things go wrong I feel real bad.

I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Baby, sometimes I’m so carefree

With a joy that’s hard to hide

And sometimes it seems that, all I have to do is worry

And then you’re bound to see my other side

I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

If I seem edgy, I want you to know,

That I never mean to take it out on you

Life has its problems, and I get my share,

And that’s one thing I never mean to do

Cause I love you,

Oh,

Oh, oh, oh, baby – don’t you know I’m human

I have thoughts like any other one

Sometimes I find myself, Lord, regretting

Some foolish thing, some little simple thing I’ve done

I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Yes, I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Yes, I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Yes, I’m just a soul whose intentions are good

Songwriters: Bennie Benjamin / Gloria Caldwell / Sol Marcus

Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood lyrics © Warner Chappell Music France