♫ Lodi ♫

I was considering a redux of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Fortunate Son, but decided I’d look just a little bit and see if there was one of their songs that I like but haven’t played here yet.  Sure enough … I came up with Lodi.  I was very surprised to find that this only charted at #52 in the U.S. and not at all in Canada or the UK, for I thought it was one of their better songs.  But then, I’m not known for my good taste  😉

This song is a reflection on John Fogerty’s days with The Golliwogs, an early version of Creedence Clearwater Revival. They had to struggle for success, playing wherever they could with dilapidated equipment and an often indifferent audience. He did not want a return to the Bad Old Days.  Lodi is a city in California located in the central valley, about 30 miles south of Sacramento and 75 or 100 miles east of San Francisco/Oakland. Fogerty and his earlier band often performed in “nowhere towns” like Lodi.

Of the song, Fogerty once said …

“On ‘Lodi’, I saw a much older person than I was, ’cause it is sort of a tragic telling. A guy is stuck in a place where people really don’t appreciate him. Since I was at the beginning of a good career, I was hoping that that wouldn’t happen to me.”

Lodi
Creedence Clearwater Revival

Just about a year ago
I set out on the road
Seekin’ my fame and fortune
Lookin’ for a pot of gold
Thing got bad things got worse
I guess you will know the tune
Oh Lord, stuck in Lodi again

I rode in on the Greyhound
I’ll be walkin’ out if I go
I was just passin’ through
Must be seven seven months or more
Ran out of time and money
Looks like they took my friends
Oh Lord, I’m stuck in Lodi again

The man from the magazine
Said I was on my way
Somewhere I lost connections
Ran out of songs to play
I came into town, a one night stand
Looks like my plans fell through
Oh Lord, stuck in Lodi again

If I only had a dollar
For ev’ry song I’ve sung
And ev’ry time I had to play
While people sat there drunk
You know, I’d catch the next train
Back to where I live
Oh Lord, I’m stuck in Lodi again
Oh Lord, I’m stuck in Lodi again

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: John Cameron Fogerty
Lodi lyrics © Concord Music Publishing LLC

♫ Lodi ♫

I was working on a new music post … a song mentioned by two different friends tonight in comments … but exhaustion has overtaken me and I just cannot finish it tonight, so stay tuned tomorrow.  Meanwhile, I dug this one out of my archives from 2018, dusted it off a bit, and … good as new!  This was one I played shortly after I started doing these music posts, as you will see … 


I started posting music a couple of weeks ago as a way to get rid of some extreme angst at that moment.  I figured I would do it for a day or two, a week at the most.  But I am having so much fun with this that I’m not ready to give it up yet!  You guys have made this so much fun with your comments and shared memories, that I now look forward to finding just the right song every night right before going to bed.  So, for now I keep doing it, and I hope you’ll all forgive me for the occasional bad choice.

Written by John Fogerty and performed by Credence Clearwater Revival, Lodi was released in April 1969 as the flip side of Bad Moon Rising.  Lodi is a small agricultural town in California’s Central Valley about 70 miles from Fogerty’s hometown of Berkeley.  A bunch of people (Tesla, Emmylou Harris, Amy Ray, Shawn Colvin, Tom Jones, Buck Owens, Jeffrey Foucault, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Ronnie Hawkins, Smokie, Dan Penn, Al Wilson, The Blue Aeroplanes, Tim Armstrong, FIDLAR, Freddie King, the Italian band Stormy Six, Bo Diddley, and Eric Church) have recorded this, but my favourite will always remain CCR.  And by the way … The Flying Burrito Brothers???  Seriously???

Lodi
Creedence Clearwater Revival
Just about a year ago
I set out on the road
Seekin’ my fame and fortune
Lookin’ for a pot of gold
Thing got bad things got worse
I guess you will know the tune
Oh Lord, stuck in Lodi again
I rode in on the Greyhound
I’ll be walkin’ out if I go
I was just passin’ through
Must be seven seven months or more
Ran out of time and money
Looks like they took my friends
Oh Lord, I’m stuck in Lodi again
The man from the magazine
Said I was on my way
Somewhere I lost connections
Ran out of songs to play
I came into town, a one night stand
Looks like my plans fell through
Oh Lord, stuck in Lodi again
If I only had a dollar
For ev’ry song I’ve sung
And ev’ry time I had to play
While people sat there drunk
You know, I’d catch the next train
Back to where I live
Oh Lord, I’m stuck in Lodi again
Oh Lord, I’m stuck in Lodi again
Songwriters: John Cameron Fogerty
Lodi lyrics © Concord Music Group, Inc

♫ Bad Moon Rising ♫ (Redux)

Okay, okay … yes, I know I just played this one last November, a few short months ago.  But see, here’s the thing … when I played CCR’s “Proud Mary” two days ago, our friend Clive commented that his favourite CCR song was “Bad Moon Rising”, and suddenly the song was being played in stereo in my head.  I didn’t recall that I had only played it a few months ago, and I made a plan to play it … and … well, you know how it is when a song is stuck in your head … and you had a plan … and Clive said, “Go on, you know you want to.”  So … without apology, here it is again!


John Fogerty explained that the lyrics were inspired by a movie called The Devil And Daniel Webster, in which a hurricane wipes out most of a town. This is where he got the idea for the words “I feel the hurricane blowin’, I hope you’re quite prepared to die.” Overall, he said the song is about the “apocalypse that was going to be visited upon us.”  That is a theme that, I think, is just about as relevant today as it was in 1969 when this song was released by Creedence Clearwater Revival, aka CCR.

The song reached its US chart peak of #2 (one of five CCR songs to place that this position – they never got to #1) on July 28, 1969, eight days after the Apollo 11 moon landing. The song has nothing to do with space travel, but the title was somewhat apropos, especially after the mission succeeded.

Now, you all know that I am the world’s worst at getting song lyrics all wrong, so I took some pleasure in reading that the line, “There’s a bad moon on the rise” has often been mistaken for “There’s a bathroom on the right”!

And now, I give you Creedence Clearwater Revival …

Bad Moon Rising
Creedence Clearwater Revival

I see a bad moon a-rising
I see trouble on the way
I see earthquakes and lightnin’
I see bad times today

Don’t go ’round tonight
It’s bound to take your life
There’s a bad moon on the rise

I hear hurricanes a-blowing
I know the end is coming soon
I fear rivers over flowing
I hear the voice of rage and ruin

Don’t go ’round tonight
It’s bound to take your life
There’s a bad moon on the rise

I hope you got your things together
I hope you are quit prepared to die
Look’s like we’re in for nasty weather
One eye is taken for an eye

Oh don’t go ’round tonight
It’s bound to take your life
There’s a bad moon on the rise
There’s a bad moon on the rise

Songwriters: John C. Fogerty
Bad Moon Rising lyrics © The Bicycle Music Company

♫ Proud Mary ♫

Another redux … my apologies, but … there is only so much of me, and I seem to have depleted the bank already this week.  Exhaustion wins out, and you get … Proud Mary!  This one just came rolling into my head earlier this evening, and despite my dour mood, I found myself stomping my feet and belting out “Proud Mary keep on burnin’ …”, much to the chagrin of both my human and feline family members.  You know you’re in trouble when Tiger Lily saunters into the kitchen, glares for a moment, and then hisses viciously!  Anyway … Proud Mary …


I had a different song picked out for tonight.  My mind, apparently, had other ideas, for as I was folding laundry, writing my ‘Good People’ post and cleaning my messy kitchen, “Big wheel keep on turnin’, Proud Mary keep on burnin'” just kept playing over and over in my head.  When I sat down to find the song I intended to post tonight, Proud Mary somehow ended up on my screen.  Sigh.  No point arguing with a mind as stubborn as mine.

Written by CCR’s John Fogerty, the song was conceived the day he got his discharge papers from the US Army.  According to Fogerty …

“The Army and Creedence overlapped, so I was ‘that hippie with a record on the radio.’ I’d been trying to get out of the Army, and on the steps of my apartment house sat a diploma-sized letter from the government. It sat there for a couple of days, right next to my door. One day, I saw the envelope and bent down to look at it, noticing it said ‘John Fogerty.’ I went into the house, opened the thing up, and saw that it was my honorable discharge from the Army. I was finally out! This was 1968 and people were still dying. I was so happy, I ran out into my little patch of lawn and turned cartwheels. Then I went into my house, picked up my guitar and started strumming. ‘Left a good job in the city’ and then several good lines came out of me immediately. I had the chord changes, the minor chord where it says, ‘Big wheel keep on turnin’/Proud Mary keep on burnin” (or ‘boinin’,’ using my funky pronunciation I got from Howling’ Wolf). By the time I hit ‘Rolling, rolling, rolling on the river,’ I knew I had written my best song. It vibrated inside me. When we rehearsed it, I felt like Cole Porter.”

The song hit #2 in the US, reached #8 in the UK, and #1 in Austria. This was the first of five singles by Creedence that went to #2 on the US chart; they have the most #2 songs without ever having a #1.

Proud Mary
Creedence Clearwater Revival

Left a good job in the city
Workin’ for the man ev’ry night and day
And I never lost one minute of sleepin’
Worryin’ ’bout the way things might have been

Big wheel keep on turnin’
Proud Mary keep on burnin’
Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river

Cleaned a lot of plates in Memphis
Pumped a lot of pane down in New Orleans
But I never saw the good side of the city
‘Til I hitched a ride on a river boat queen

Big wheel keep on turnin’
Proud Mary keep on burnin’
Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river
Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river

If you come down to the river
Bet you gonna find some people who live
You don’t have to worry ’cause you have [if you got] no money
People on the river are happy to give

Big wheel keep on turnin’
Proud Mary keep on burnin’
Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river
Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river

Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river
Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river
Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river

Songwriters: John C. Fogerty
Proud Mary lyrics © The Bicycle Music Company

♫ Lookin’ Out My Back Door ♫

It’s colder than heck most everyplace, so I thought tonight would be a good time to play something to get your toes tapping, stir the adrenaline, and warm you up a bit.

Released in July 1970, this one by Creedence Clearwater Revival (CCR), hit #2 in the U.S., but only went to #20 in the UK.  Still, #20 isn’t all that bad, all things considered.

This song was partly written for John Fogerty’s son Josh, who at the time was three years old. According to Fogerty …

“I knew he would love it if he heard me on the radio singing – doot doot doo, lookin’ out my back door.”

And the part about a parade passing was inspired, according to John, by a Dr. Seuss book that he read as a kid titled To Think I Saw It On Mulberry Street.  But, apparently conspiracy theorists even delve into music to spin their tall tales, for many people thought this was about drugs when it was really an innocent song inspired by a child. According to the drug theory, the “Flying Spoon” was a cocaine spoon, and the crazy animal images were an acid trip.

Lookin’ Out My Back Door
Creedence Clearwater Revival

Just got home from Illinois, lock the front door, oh boy!
Got to sit down, take a rest on the porch
Imagination sets in, pretty soon I’m singin’
Doo, doo, doo, lookin’ out my back door

There’s a giant doin’ cartwheels, a statue wearin’ high heels
Look at all the happy creatures dancin’ on the lawn
Dinosaur Victrola, listenin’ to Buck Owens
Doo, doo, doo, lookin’ out my back door

Tambourines and elephants are playin’ in the band
Won’t you take a ride on the flyin’ spoon? Dood-n-doo-doo
Wonderous apparition provided by magician
Doo, doo, doo, lookin’ out my back door

Tambourines and elephants are playin’ in the band
Won’t you take a ride on the flyin’ spoon? Dood-n-doo-doo
Bother me tomorrow, today I’ll buy no sorrows
Doo, doo, doo, lookin’ out my back door

Forward troubles Illinois, lock the front door, oh boy!
Look at all the happy creatures dancin’ on the lawn
Bother me tomorrow, today I’ll buy no sorrows
Doo, doo, doo, lookin’ out my back door

Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: J. C. Fogerty
Lookin’ Out My Back Door lyrics © Jondora Music

♫ Bad Moon Rising ♫ (Redux)

As I was catching up on comments late tonight, I noted that blogging friend Mary Plumbago had mentioned a couple of song titles that our current situation brought to her mind, and one of those was this one, Bad Moon Rising, by Creedence Clearwater Revival.  As I sit here, well past the time that most normal people are sawing logs and dreaming of mermaids under the sea, I am pondering … pondering the future of this nation.  When I re-read this post that I first played in 2018, and I read the words of John Fogerty saying that the song is about “the apocalypse that was going to be visited upon us”, I cannot help but relate it to our current situation — a volatile election, an incumbent with the mentality of a 4-year-old child, a global standing teetering on the brink of being annihilated, and a world seemingly gone mad.  Tonight, my friends, I feel a bad moon rising …


John Fogerty explained that the lyrics were inspired by a movie called The Devil And Daniel Webster, in which a hurricane wipes out most of a town. This is where he got the idea for the words “I feel the hurricane blowin’, I hope you’re quite prepared to die.” Overall, he said the song is about the “apocalypse that was going to be visited upon us.”  That is a theme that, I think, is just about as relevant today as it was in 1969 when this song was released by Creedence Clearwater Revival, aka CCR.

The song reached its US chart peak of #2 (one of five CCR songs to place that this position – they never got to #1) on July 28, 1969, eight days after the Apollo 11 moon landing. The song has nothing to do with space travel, but the title was somewhat apropos, especially after the mission succeeded.

Now, you all know that I am the world’s worst at getting song lyrics all wrong, so I took some pleasure in reading that the line, “There’s a bad moon on the rise” has often been mistaken for “There’s a bathroom on the right”!

And now, I give you Creedence Clearwater Revival …

Bad Moon Rising
Creedence Clearwater Revival

I see a bad moon a-rising
I see trouble on the way
I see earthquakes and lightnin’
I see bad times today

Don’t go ’round tonight
It’s bound to take your life
There’s a bad moon on the rise

I hear hurricanes a-blowing
I know the end is coming soon
I fear rivers over flowing
I hear the voice of rage and ruin

Don’t go ’round tonight
It’s bound to take your life
There’s a bad moon on the rise

I hope you got your things together
I hope you are quit prepared to die
Look’s like we’re in for nasty weather
One eye is taken for an eye

Oh don’t go ’round tonight
It’s bound to take your life
There’s a bad moon on the rise
There’s a bad moon on the rise

Songwriters: John C. Fogerty
Bad Moon Rising lyrics © The Bicycle Music Company

♫ Who’ll Stop The Rain ♫

I started to play a song by Gladys Knight tonight, but found I had already played it.  Then, I started to play one by Roberta Flack … already played it.  So, I just cruised around the dial, seeking something that I hadn’t already played and that I like, and finally, at 3:30 a.m., hit on this one by Creedence Clearwater Revival (CCR).

Group leader John Fogerty wrote this song. Released in 1970, the song is often interpreted as a protest of the Vietnam War (like Fortunate Son), but when he performed it at the Arizona state fair in 2012, Fogerty told the crowd that he had been at Woodstock, watching the rain come down. He watched the festival goers dance in the rain, muddy, naked, cold, huddling together, and it just kept raining. So when he got back home after that weekend, he sat down and wrote Who’ll Stop the Rain, making it not a Vietnam protest at all, but a recounting of his Woodstock experience.

The line, “I went down Virginia, seekin’ shelter from the storm” gave Bob Dylan the idea for the title of his 1975 song Shelter From The Storm.

The song was a concert staple for Bruce Springsteen during 1980-81’s River Tour, as well as on the summer 2003 leg of the Rising Tour. Springsteen and the E Street Band opened with Who’ll Stop the Rain whenever it was raining.  When Creedence Clearwater Revival was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993, Springsteen performed the song with John Fogerty.

Who’ll Stop the Rain
Creedence Clearwater Revival

Long as I remember the rain been coming down.
Clouds of myst’ry pouring confusion on the ground.
Good men through the ages, trying to find the sun;
And I wonder, still I wonder, who’ll stop the rain.

I went down Virginia, seeking shelter from the storm.
Caught up in the fable, I watched the tower grow.
Five year plans and new deals, wrapped in golden chains.
And I wonder, still I wonder who’ll stop the rain.

Heard the singers playing, how we cheered for more.
The crowd had rushed together, trying to keep warm.
Still the rain kept pouring, falling on my ears.
And I wonder, still I wonder who’ll stop the rain.

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: John C. Fogerty
Who’ll Stop the Rain lyrics © The Bicycle Music Company

♫ Have You Ever Seen The Rain? ♫

This song was written by John Fogerty and released as a single in 1971 from the album Pendulum (1970) by roots rock group Creedence Clearwater Revival.  The song charted highest in Canada, reaching #1 on the RPM 100 national singles chart in March 1971. In the U.S., in the same year it peaked at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. In the UK, it reached #36. It was the group’s eighth gold-selling single.

Some have speculated that the song’s lyrics are referencing the Vietnam War, with the “rain” being a metaphor for bombs falling from the sky. In his review for Allmusic website, Mark Deming suggests that the song is about the idealism of the 1960s and about how it faded in the wake of events such as the Altamont Free Concert and the Kent State shootings, and that Fogerty is saying that the same issues of the 1960s still existed in the 1970s but that people were no longer fighting for them. However, Fogerty himself has said in interviews and prior to playing the song in concert that it is about rising tension within CCR and the imminent departure of his brother Tom from the band.  Tom Fogerty left the group in early 1971, after this album was released. He released three solo albums before dying of tuberculosis in 1990. A fourth album, completed in 1988, was released posthumously.

In an interview, Fogerty stated that the song was written about the fact that they were on the top of the charts, and had surpassed all of their wildest expectations of fame and fortune. They were rich and famous, but somehow all of the members of the band at the time were depressed and unhappy; thus the line “Have you ever seen the rain, coming down on a sunny day?”. The band split in October the following year after the release of the album Mardi Gras.

Have You Ever Seen the Rain
Creedence Clearwater Revival

Someone told me long ago
There’s a calm before the storm
I know, it’s been comin’ for some time

When it’s over, so they say
It will rain a sunny day
I know, shinin’ down like water

I wanna know, have you ever seen the rain?
I wanna know, have you ever seen the rain
Comin’ down on a sunny day?

Yesterday and days before
Sun is cold and rain is hard
I know, been that way for all my time

And forever, on it goes
Through the circle, fast and slow
I know, it can’t stop, I wonder

I wanna know, have you ever seen the rain?
I wanna know, have you ever seen the rain
Comin’ down on a sunny day?

Yeah

I wanna know, have you ever seen the rain?
I wanna know, have you ever seen the rain
Comin’ down on a sunny day?

Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: John C. Fogerty
Have You Ever Seen the Rain lyrics © Jondora Music

♫ Down On The Corner ♫

I have no idea why I’m playing this particular song tonight.  It hasn’t been going through my head, as is sometimes the case, and it hasn’t been mentioned by anyone that I can recall.  But, when I sat down to think about a song, there it was!  It’s got a nice beat to it, so … why not?

This song by Creedence Clearwater Revival in 1969 tells the story of a fictional jug band, Willy and the Poor Boys, who were street musicians “playing for nickels, can’t be beat.” The name of the jug band was also the name of CCR’s fourth straight million-selling album.

John Fogerty did all the singing on this. He recorded a bunch of vocal tracks that were overdubbed to create the effect that he was harmonizing with himself.

You all know how terrible I am with lyrics, for 90% of the time I mis-hear them?  Well, imagine my delight when I read that one line in this song is often mis-heard by most people!  The line is “Willy goes into a dance and doubles on kazoo”, and people often hear that last part as “Devil’s on the loose”.  A journalist named Phil Elwood made that mistake and published it in a newspaper article. John Fogerty got a big kick out of this, and as a nod to Elwood, put this line into the CCR song Run Through the Jungle

They told me, “Don’t go walking slow
‘Cause Devil’s on the loose”

The song has been covered by a few thousand artists … okay, perhaps I exaggerate just a tad … including Bo Diddley, Jerry Reed, The Osmond Brothers, Harry Belafonte, and others.  It has also been featured in Walgreens commercials since 2012, with the tagline “At the Corner of Happy and Healthy”.

Down on the Corner
Creedence Clearwater Revival

Early in the evenin’ just about supper time
Over by the courthouse they’re starting to unwind
Four kids on the corner trying to bring you up
Willy picks a tune out and he blows it on the harp

Down on the corner
Out in the street
Willy and the Poor Boys are playin’
Bring a nickel, tap your feet

Rooster hits the washboard and people just got to smile
Blinky thumps the gut bass and solos for a while
Poor Boy twangs the rhythm out on his kalamazoo
And Willy goes into a dance and doubles on kazoo

Down on the corner
Out in the street
Willy and the Poor Boys are playin’
Bring a nickel, tap your feet

Down on the corner
Out in the street
Willy and the Poor Boys are playin’
Bring a nickel, tap your feet

You don’t need a penny just to hang around
But if you’ve got a nickel, won’t you lay your money down?
Over on the corner there’s a happy noise
People come from all around to watch the magic boy

Down on the corner
Out in the street
Willy and the Poor Boys are playin’
Bring a nickel, tap your feet

Down on the corner
Out in the street
Willy and the Poor Boys are playin’
Bring a nickel, tap your feet

Down on the corner
Out in the street
Willy and the Poor Boys are playin’
Bring a nickel, tap your feet

Down on the corner
Out in the street
Willy and the Poor Boys are playin’
Bring a nickel, tap your feet

Songwriters: John Cameron Fogerty
Down on the Corner lyrics © The Bicycle Music Company

♫ Fortunate Son ♫

Moods.  The music I choose on any given night depends largely on my mood at the moment, although sometimes I do play a song because I have been asked, or because I think it will bring you guys pleasure.  I cannot describe my mood tonight … I have been teetering on the edge of the rabbit hole for a bit, am tired of the pain being inflicted on the nation I’ve spent 67 years in, and wondering what is to become of, not only this nation, but the world in general.  Besides that, it has been friggin’ cold … this was the screenshot from my phone this morning … note the temperature in the upper left corner …Screenshot_20190130-083454_Samsung Experience Home.jpg

So, don’t ask why I picked this song today … just something to do with my mood and the Polar Vortex.

The song was released in 1969, at the height of the war in Vietnam and the stateside protests against our role in it.  It soon became an anti-war movement anthem; an expressive symbol of the counterculture’s opposition to U.S. military involvement in the Vietnam War and solidarity with the soldiers fighting it.

The song itself is not explicit in its criticism of that war in particular, rather, it “speaks more to the unfairness of class than war itself,” according to its creator, John Fogerty.

“The thoughts behind this song – it was a lot of anger. So it was the Vietnam War going on… Now I was drafted and they’re making me fight, and no one has actually defined why. So this was all boiling inside of me and I sat down on the edge of my bed and out came “It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no senator’s son!” You know, it took about 20 minutes to write the song.

Fortunate Son wasn’t really inspired by any one event. Julie Nixon was dating David Eisenhower. You’d hear about the son of this senator or that congressman who was given a deferment from the military or a choice position in the military. They seemed privileged and whether they liked it or not, these people were symbolic in the sense that they weren’t being touched by what their parents were doing. They weren’t being affected like the rest of us.”

This song has been featured in so many movies it makes your head spin, such as Forrest Gump, Black Hawk Down, and The Manchurian Candidate, to name a few.

Fortunate Son
Creedence Clearwater Revival

Some folks are born made to wave the flag
Ooh, they’re red, white and blue
And when the band plays “Hail to the chief”
Ooh, they point the cannon at you, Lord
It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no senator’s son, son
It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate one, no

Some folks are born silver spoon in hand
Lord, don’t they help themselves, oh
But when the taxman comes to the door
Lord, the house looks like a rummage sale, yes

It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no millionaire’s son, no
It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate one, no

Some folks inherit star spangled eyes
Ooh, they send you down to war, Lord
And when you ask them, “How much should we give?”
Ooh, they only answer “More! More! More!” yoh

It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no military son, son
It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate one, one

It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate one, no no no
It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate son, no no no

Songwriters: John C Fogerty
Fortunate Son lyrics © The Bicycle Music Company