Saturday Surprise — Bubble Wrap Art!

Bradley Hart is an artist.  All his life, he has been intensely interested in art.  Born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, he was only 11 years old when he first enrolled into Thornton Hall, a private art school where he took classical art training including the replication of Renaissance masters works.  In 2002, Hart received his B.A. from the University of Toronto, Canada, with a double major in Visual Art and Semiotic Communication Theory (whatever the heck that is!) and a minor in Cinema Studies.  Soon thereafter, Hart moved to New York where he still lives today.

Bradley is an artist, but his canvas is unique … bubble wrap!  Yep, you heard right … bubble wrap.  He injects paint into bubble wrap, using each blob as a pixel to create his large-scale photorealistic images.  Says Hart …

“I load thousands of syringes with paint in preparation to begin the injection. I’ve done portraits of the likes of Marilyn Monroe, Kurt Cobain Michael Jackson, David Bowie, John Lennon.”

Invented in 1957, bubble wrap was originally intended to be marketed as textured wallpaper. What turned out to be an epic failure from the decorator point of view turned out to be a boon to the shipping industry—and to Bradley Hart.

“Researching the history of bubble wrap and realizing that it was meant to be wallpaper brought me around to this great idea. What is a painting—short of the cultural significance and historical value it may obtain over time? It’s ostensibly a wall covering.”

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But there’s a flip side to Hart’s paintings … literally!  He injects paint into bubble wrap, using each blob as a pixel to create his large-scale photorealistic images.  After the injection the drops are removed from the backside of the plastic to reveal an imprint of the work, becoming yet another piece of art through the impressions from the injected paint.

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Says Hart …

“The injections are a metaphor for the ways we punctuate our lives with Google searches, selfies and Facebook posts. The antithetical idea of protection vs. fragility of the substance itself is also endemic to the work. On a personal level, the process of injecting ironically references the need to inject myself with disease-modifying medication for my own MS over the past decade.”

Watch him tell a bit about his work

When he started out, Hart was only able to inject a few cells at a time before having to step back to review his progress. He’s since invented a computer algorithm that gives him a working bird’s eye view. While it makes the process faster, it’s still time-consuming.

Now, I’m not saying these paintings are something I necessarily want hanging on my living room walls, but they are definitely unique, as is the artist’s method.  Bradley Hart has infinitely more patience than I have, taking days to fill all those syringes, then injecting the paint into the bubble wrap, one bubble at a time!  Talk about tedious!  Still, I thought you might enjoy seeing Mr. Hart’s work and technique!  Now, go forth and have a wonderful weekend, my friends!